Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 34 of 34
  1. Collapse Details
    #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    2,404
    Default
    Loaded 11 Lite on my workstation. I4770K, 16GB ram, Asrock Extreme 4 TB4 Thunderbolt MB, MSI GTX760 2GB GPU. Runs fine, plays 2k Cinema DNG raw sequences real time or very near real time off of a single 7200rpm dedicated media drive, no raid. Cinema DNG 1080p plays real time no issues. Just learning it myself, but the new DNG raw tools are great, on par with what one gets in ACR.
    Sample practice frame grade from my Digital Bolex:

    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    1,241
    Default
    Just used an X-Rite ColorChecker with Resolve 11. Wow.

    Being able to have Resolve essentially get you almost "there" will leave you gob smacked. Has to be tried to really appreciate how good it is. This is not your run of the mill auto colour tool by any stretch.

    While I will use both my trusty DSC chart and the X-RIte ColorChecker (essentially a Macbeth chart for those that have been around a while), it should be known, the X-Rite chart is a fraction of the cost of a DSC Chrome du Monde chart. The X-Rite one gives you the "get in the ball park" grade and the higher end DSC chart (not the one Blackmagic recommends but a DSC Red Chart or a Chrome du Monde style chart) will give you information about tonal spread and colour chips that correspond in a useful way to a vectorscope so you can make inteliligent color shifts when doing your initial grade.

    Never thought I would have much use for a Macbeth style chart anymore once I got a DSC chart. I was wrong.
    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #33
    Senior Member starcentral's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    6,702
    Default
    Hi Andrew, I too am happy that I can use auto match in the future within color grading software itself. I used the feature in FCP X before and wow what a time saver under specific situations.

    I'm going to have to give 11 another go.
    Dennis Hingsberg
    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    2,404
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Stone View Post
    Just used an X-Rite ColorChecker with Resolve 11. Wow.

    Being able to have Resolve essentially get you almost "there" will leave you gob smacked. Has to be tried to really appreciate how good it is. This is not your run of the mill auto colour tool by any stretch.

    While I will use both my trusty DSC chart and the X-RIte ColorChecker (essentially a Macbeth chart for those that have been around a while), it should be known, the X-Rite chart is a fraction of the cost of a DSC Chrome du Monde chart. The X-Rite one gives you the "get in the ball park" grade and the higher end DSC chart (not the one Blackmagic recommends but a DSC Red Chart or a Chrome du Monde style chart) will give you information about tonal spread and colour chips that correspond in a useful way to a vectorscope so you can make inteliligent color shifts when doing your initial grade.

    Never thought I would have much use for a Macbeth style chart anymore once I got a DSC chart. I was wrong.
    One thing you need to watch for using the X-rite chart, possibly the DSC chart too. It is not so good for trying to correct to lighting sources with significant color casts, spikes or gaps in their spectrum. It is best for profiling to color temperature of lights that pretty much conform to a standard black body radiator curve spectrum. The X-rite is calibrated for CIE XYZ space and is most useful for base profiling Bayer raw cameras to daylight and tungsten sources. The DSC chart is calibrated for REC709 space and will produce vector targets that fall correctly on a scope.
    The classic color checker includes reference 8-bit RGB and L*A*B value tables for each patch. In XYZ space there are many possible L*A*B vector values that can produce the same color. Only the reference set of values produces correct vector alignments so that color changes in the grade track properly. This is where spikes or unusual color casts to the lights can throw off the calibration and make it hard to grade.
    Reply With Quote
     

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •