Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 28 of 28
  1. Collapse Details
    #21
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by paulears View Post
    Being semi- pedantic and making up a new legal status, we should consider if it's actually stealing, which I suspect it isn't but it would be taking without the owners consent, which is what teenage car joyriders get charged with in the UK. No intent to permanently deprive, so not theft, just taking without consent, a less serious crime.
    erm, it definitely wouldn't be taking without the owners consent. ;)
    The building or landscape continues to be there even if you take a photo.
    There is not even any intent to temporarily deprive anyone!

    The use of the word "stealing" just gets thrown around a lot, perhaps because it sounds more exciting or something.

    Freya


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #22
    Senior Member jamedia.uk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Birmingham UK
    Posts
    575
    Default
    @Freya

    So if I copy your next fill and sell it to lots of people before you do (thus killing your sales) that is not a crime either? theft does to have to be the direct physical removal of something. Just like when people copy and use photographers pictures it is a crime.


    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #23
    Senior Member craigbowman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta Canada
    Posts
    1,880
    Default
    To date, I've never had any problems getting signed releases for anything.


    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #24
    Chapelgrove Films
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    4,416
    Default
    Consider not only the building. The signage may consist of copyrighted material or registered logos. There may be people going into and out of the business.

    My question is -- How hard is it to just go ask the owner of the business for permission?

    Most folks would be happy to sign a release to get their business shown in a movie, assuming the scene wouldn't reflect negatively on the business.
    David W. Richardson
    Writer/Producer/Director/Editor
    Chapel Grove Films
    Celtic Cross Films
    Bliss Video Productions
    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1400903/?ref_=tt_ov_dr


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    4,978
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by craigbowman View Post
    To date, I've never had any problems getting signed releases for anything.
    Perhaps So. Cal is different. I think all California counties have some sort of 'film permit' requirement, and in some cases even when shooting indoors on private property... the only time that becomes an issue is if the production crew upsets the neighbors and they call the cops... but absent that... most indoor shooting would go unnoticed...

    On the other hand shooting on public streets sidewalks, may precipitate a police interaction, wherein one potentially may be asked for a permit, and cite if not in order. Further, in some cases, not only myself but from others report to me, 'asking' often gets a 'how much are you going to pay' response, even when the shooting is on public property.

    Asking to stand on private property, even more 'money' may be asked.

    I shot on the property of a famous hotel in town recently, and the person who's project it is, had to get permits, worm their way into the hearts and minds of the 'publicity' staff of the hotel, and still pay $600 for a day insurance rider... part of the 'in consideration' was a the use of the material shot as promotions for the hotel... which for 'my' budget level of film is fine, but often for other businesses, they want more money than 'free' promo material.

    There are of course people who wrangle deals... I'm not one of them...


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #26
    Default
    I'm thinking of any and all locations -- from private residences to hotels, car parks, filming from inside a car in a car park, theme parks, shopping malls, trains, national parks, roads.
    whoooaahhhh there, buddy. This covers alot of ground.

    First thing is to go online and look up the legalities of shooting in public places in your area. Someting like a public park or whatever. Perhaps youll need to get a permit, but find out what the terms are! If you want to be a filmmaker in your area its your job to know this stuff.

    Then, ideally, you inch your way towards shooting in places where you can get releases for easily.

    Being a low-budget producer (and this is the role youre playing here) is a skill set made up of sub-skills, so start building your location skills bit by bit.

    Example:

    -I shoot in nyc. I know that it is legal to shoot on NYC streets as long as I don't obstruct anyone. I also know that I should keep businesses and anything copyrighted out of the shot. The short Im doing now is shot under the BQE.

    - I am also aware that I can apply for a permit to shoot in NYC parks pretty easily and cheaply. So thats on my list of possible locations for when I get an idea for a scene I want to do in a park.

    -My brother owns a house, I'll be shooting a short there.


    Am I saying you can never cheat a location? I think they do it in hollywood movies all the time. But what Im saying here is to start to build up your own personal list of procedures for places to shoot. Take out your work journal (you dont have a filmmaking work journal?) and start a list of "places I can shoot legally and/or easily" or "locations" or whatever, and keep notes on each ("poor mans process- can do in garage"). And then, if your working micro-budget (which Im guessing you are) you write your movie to the locations you have or that you know you can easily deal with. Keep in mind for EL Mariachi RR basically had permission to use the entire town.

    But your movies already shot, right?

    Well, same thing. On a case by case basis, youll have places you need a permit, places where noone would be able to prosecute (can someone tell that your "forest" is a local park? Probably not. And As someone mentioned- noone expects you to get permits for buildings whizzing past in a car shot! ). Distributors will ask for releases, so I hear. Im not at that stage yet. But Im starting to build up my knowledge and keeping the habit of covering my ass so when the time comes I wont ...er...get bit in the ass...or something.


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #27
    Chapelgrove Films
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    4,416
    Default
    I'm a professional. I don't take my cast and crew anywhere that I don't have explicit permission to be.

    If I were trespassing with my cast and crew and we got run off from the location, that would be a direct reflection of my professionalism, or lack thereof. When I shoot, my cast and crew have the confidence of knowing they have every right to be at that location. There is no need to rush things or attempt to hide what we're doing.

    Consider this -- what if someone on your cast or crew gets hurt or killed at the location? Who is going to be responsible legally and financially? YOU, that's who. Even if you have insurance, it's not going to cover you if you're in a location where you have no permission to be. One accident can destroy you financially for life, and may even put you in jail. Consider what happened to Sarah Jones (killed) and seven others (injured), not to mention the director, first assistant director, and two producers, who were charged with involuntary manslaughter. Randall Miller (the director) was sentenced to 2 years in prison, fined $20,000, and banned from being a director or assistant director for 10 years. One producer and the first assistant director got 10 years probation each.

    I protect my cast and crew, and their safety and security is my #1 concern. I'm not protecting them if I take them trespassing on a site.
    David W. Richardson
    Writer/Producer/Director/Editor
    Chapel Grove Films
    Celtic Cross Films
    Bliss Video Productions
    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1400903/?ref_=tt_ov_dr


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    #28
    Chapelgrove Films
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    4,416
    Default
    Consider also the rights of the property owner.

    Would you be okay with a group of people you don't know coming into your house while you're away, completely without your knowledge or permission? They have a little party, but clean up after themselves so when you get home you have no idea they were even there -- until the video they shot of their partying goes viral on YouTube. How would you feel about your own privacy being invaded?

    Anyone who owns a business, a home, or a piece of property has the absolute right to decide whether or not they want you shooting there.
    David W. Richardson
    Writer/Producer/Director/Editor
    Chapel Grove Films
    Celtic Cross Films
    Bliss Video Productions
    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1400903/?ref_=tt_ov_dr


    Reply With Quote
     

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •