Page 39 of 85 FirstFirst ... 2935363738394041424349 ... LastLast
Results 381 to 390 of 844
  1. Collapse Details
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    801
    Default
    I tried the zip file thing with DaVinci resolve, the zip file isn't recognized. I then tried dropping a non-zipped version into DR and it just crashed.

    I can't figure out how to use mxfwrap either, lol.


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    Senior Member corycross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    547
    Default
    Could a firmware similar to this come out that would allow the C100 to shoot up to 4k raw? I love the idea of raw, I don't really need it at the moment... But having it would certainly inspire me to go out and film some stuff with it!


    LOVELY!


    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by atarijedi View Post
    I tried the zip file thing with DaVinci resolve, the zip file isn't recognized. I then tried dropping a non-zipped version into DR and it just crashed.

    I can't figure out how to use mxfwrap either, lol.

    well I got close. I put in a similar file structure folder to how most cdng's look and it did load and play in resolve. However, it was very tiny and small and pixelated. Its gotta be something simple.


    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    Senior Member cowpunk52's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA | Santa Fe, NM
    Posts
    1,383
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by corycross View Post
    Could a firmware similar to this come out that would allow the C100 to shoot up to 4k raw? I love the idea of raw, I don't really need it at the moment... But having it would certainly inspire me to go out and film some stuff with it!


    LOVELY!
    You should go out and film some stuff anyway ;)
    Cinematographer | Camera Op | Occasional Director
    Currently Shooting "Expedition Unknown" on Travel Channel
    IATSE Local 600

    Twitter: @BrianCWeed


    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,152
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by bitcrusher View Post
    MODERN filmcameras do not have rolling shutter. At all. This has been debated here in DVXUser completely. So when someone says something:

    "Plus rolling shutter is twice as fast as any DSLR, comparable to film cameras."

    It's just wrong. Correcting that completely would require a new thread as not to pollute this one. Posting an image from a 1920's cam is not really applicable is it?
    Last edited by maarek; 05-17-2013 at 03:39 AM.


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    2,316
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by maarek View Post
    MODERN filmcameras do not have rolling shutter. At all. This has been debated here in DVXUser completely. So when someone says something:

    "Plus rolling shutter is twice as fast as any DSLR, comparable to film cameras."

    It's just wrong. Correcting that completely would require a new thread as not to pollute this one. Posting an image from a 1920's cam is not really applicable is it?
    All motion picture film cameras with rotating mirror shutters have by definition a rolling shutter. Arriflex and Panavision cameras have rolling shutters. The leadiing edge of the shutter wipes across the film plane at the beginning of exposure and the trailing edge wipes across the film plane at the end of exposure. It shows up as vertical distortion on fast pans, but for normal movement following ASC guidelines isn't noticeable. Compared to digital cameras it is insignificant. But it is there and does affect image blur and distortion on fast motion. It is roughly 5ms for 24fps 180 degree shutter.

    Digital cameras with rolling shutter read out the image line by line. The total readout time for DSLR's is typically in the 15-20ms range. This creates not only the vertical image smear that all rolling shutter cameras exhibit film or not, but also creates the line by line ripple artifacts with vibration or shake that we call jello when the movement is faster than the readout time. The effect is very different from film rolling shutter and due to the sensor still being exposed to light while readout occurs. The fastest rolling shutter digital cameras are in the 9ms range, getting close to film.


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    Default
    Also, as an addition to Razz16mm's post, some Panavision film cameras have butterfly shutters which rotate at half the speed of a half-moon shutter, so they exhibit twice the shutter artifacts of a half-moon shutter camera.


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel H View Post
    Any cinemaDNG samples for download anywhere?
    Down here: http://www.ikonoskop.com/downloads/cinemadng/


    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
    Senior Member Samuel H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Madrid, Spain
    Posts
    7,305
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Razz16mm View Post
    All motion picture film cameras with rotating mirror shutters have by definition a rolling shutter. Arriflex and Panavision cameras have rolling shutters. The leadiing edge of the shutter wipes across the film plane at the beginning of exposure and the trailing edge wipes across the film plane at the end of exposure. It shows up as vertical distortion on fast pans, but for normal movement following ASC guidelines isn't noticeable. Compared to digital cameras it is insignificant. But it is there and does affect image blur and distortion on fast motion. It is roughly 5ms for 24fps 180 degree shutter.

    Digital cameras with rolling shutter read out the image line by line. The total readout time for DSLR's is typically in the 15-20ms range. This creates not only the vertical image smear that all rolling shutter cameras exhibit film or not, but also creates the line by line ripple artifacts with vibration or shake that we call jello when the movement is faster than the readout time. The effect is very different from film rolling shutter and due to the sensor still being exposed to light while readout occurs. The fastest rolling shutter digital cameras are in the 9ms range, getting close to film.
    Great write-up. I've got some measurements here: http://www.dvxuser.com/V6/showthread...on-this-issue! A bit slower than what you mention, but not completely out of line

    Quote Originally Posted by cpc View Post
    Thanks!


    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
    Senior Member Efexone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    476
    Default
    I'll jump in here... Replace the D800 with a BMD 4k cam or find a used 5DMkIII ?



    Reply With Quote
     

Page 39 of 85 FirstFirst ... 2935363738394041424349 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •