Thread: Canon Scoopic

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    Canon Scoopic
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    Id like to get a 16mm camera for some shorts that I plan to make, but I would like a camera thats the best for its price....low price

    I was looking into the Canon Scoopic, and the reviews on the DS8 version werent so great, and I cant find reviews for the 16mm version. Is it a good camera?, has anyone had expereince with this camera?

    -Matt-


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    http://www.terrarimthemovie.com was shot entirely on Scoopics...

    Scoopics are pretty decent little cameras, with decent lenses. But it depends on what your needs are. Scoopics are LOUD, so if you want to shoot scenes with dialogue, scoopics can be challenging to pull that off.


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    Given the high costs associated with film aquisition, it's hard for me to recognize the value of a 16mm Scoopic.

    -It doesn't do Super16.
    -It has a fixed lens.
    -It only holds a couple minutes of film
    -Stock / processing / transfer is still costly considering the minimums.

    However, with good film it can be a great little camera. A cinematographer I often worked with while in Texas actually shot small segments of some stuff for another state's lotto ads on a Scoopic. This, of course, was a very small part of the ad. Everything else was Super16 on Arri SR3.

    The Scoopic footage was apparently good enough.


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    Barry,

    Do you have any experience with a scoopic outfitted with a crystal sync motor in it? Is it quiet enough to be able to do CU dialouge shots?


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    I haven't used the crystal scoopic. From what I understand, it's every bit as loud; it's just synchronized.

    I know people that love Scoopics, but frankly I don't get it -- just get a CP16. You'll get interchangeable lenses, 400' mags, and nearly silent operation. A Scoopic is primarily a wild (i.e., non-sync) camera for insert shots.


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    Senior Member Rosestar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry_Green
    I haven't used the crystal scoopic. From what I understand, it's every bit as loud; it's just synchronized.

    I know people that love Scoopics, but frankly I don't get it -- just get a CP16. You'll get interchangeable lenses, 400' mags, and nearly silent operation. A Scoopic is primarily a wild (i.e., non-sync) camera for insert shots.
    Barry is right. I've shot a bit with the Scoopic. Setting one up for crystal sync is no problem, however, they do sound like a coffe grinder and blimping one for CU shots would be a pain in the ass. As an MOS camera, the Canon is sweet, especially where a low profile is needed. The 100' loads are a pain. Also be carefull about light leaks around the film door.

    The CP-16R is one of the best values for independent filmmaking. It has a C-mount, so there are tons of lenses for it (I would look for one with the trusty 12-120 Angenieux, or better yet, the 10-150 which is harder to find and more expensive). The CP-16, without the reflex system is more common, but you will need a reflex zoom. The CPs are quiet, solid cameras.

    One of my favorite 16mm cameras is the Cinema Products (CP) GSMO (called the "gizmo") is a great camera. It takes 400' mags, takes C-mount lenes, is light weight and very quiet. When I shot with one, even with my eye to the eyepiece (and ear right next to the camera), I could not tell the camera was running. I loved it.

    There are a lot of good cameras out there. The Canon Scoopic will make good images, but there are other cameras with more features out there.

    If you are looking to get into filmmaking. I would suggest getting a copy of "Independent Filmmaking" by Lenny Lipton. It is made for the filmmaker and goes through every aspect of it. It is kinda dated, but worth it. It has great descriptions of almost all of the 16mm cameras.
    "A film is never any good unless the camera is the eye of a poet."

    "To me the great hope is... people that normally wouldn't be making movies will make them and suddenly some little fat girl in Ohio will be the new Mozart and will make a beautiful film using her father's camera-corder and the "Professionalism" of movie making will be destroyed forever and it will finally become an art form."


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    here is a short film (or at least part of it, i ran out of space) i shot with a scoopic. (all mos).

    http://astro.temple.edu/~watsona/identity.html

    The camera wasnt bad but i would probably prefer to shot with a bolex over it. I didnt like how the Fstops worked on the camera and the view finder was a bitch to use (mostly becasue i have glasses). However its not a bad little camera.


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    Rosestar, thanks for the insighton the scoopic and the CP. I am acually not a beginner, but i realize why u thought that, since I am interested in 16mm cameras. I acually have read the book you recommended, and I have read many others, I am experienced in the film world of films, as well as the digital. I am more or less looking for an inexpensive 16mm camera for me to toy around with, and make small shorts with for me on my own, as opposed to the larger films I take part in. I was hoping for an honest assesment of this camera, and you guys gave me good information, thanks all

    -Matt-


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    Senior Member Rosestar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dyrseve989
    Rosestar, thanks for the insighton the scoopic and the CP. I am acually not a beginner, but i realize why u thought that, since I am interested in 16mm cameras. I acually have read the book you recommended, and I have read many others, I am experienced in the film world of films, as well as the digital. I am more or less looking for an inexpensive 16mm camera for me to toy around with, and make small shorts with for me on my own, as opposed to the larger films I take part in. I was hoping for an honest assesment of this camera, and you guys gave me good information, thanks all

    -Matt-
    No problem. I like the Bolex over the Scoopic. The Bolex is much more versatile, with interchangable lenses and a choice of motors. I found that the Scoopic is not as wide on the short end as I sometimes like and it is handy to toss a 10mm on the Bolex and shoot the whole room. Plus the Bolex was produced in much more quantity than the Scoopic and is easier to find used. Although, there are quite a few Scoopics on E-bay, cheap.

    Here is a site with new and used Bolex stuff.

    http://www.chamblesscineequip.com/
    "A film is never any good unless the camera is the eye of a poet."

    "To me the great hope is... people that normally wouldn't be making movies will make them and suddenly some little fat girl in Ohio will be the new Mozart and will make a beautiful film using her father's camera-corder and the "Professionalism" of movie making will be destroyed forever and it will finally become an art form."


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    probably the best cheap camera to play around with would be a non-reflex bolex, they can often be found with lenses for about $300, much less than a reflex model. I find they even give a better image for intercutting with modern cameras as the light does not pass through the finder prism. Obviously you can't see through the lens while shooting, but anyone who has ever shot with a reflex bolex knows you can't see when shooting anyway. The paralax finder is just like a point and shoot camera.


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