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    Using UPS for external work
    #1
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    I have a spare Belkin F6C-120 UPS around and I was wondering would it be enough to provide power for some light field work, for example powering the wireless mic receiver or a laptop? How many minutes can I expect?


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    #2
    Senior Member
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    Mar 2011
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    Not sure how much your laptop and/or wireless mic will be consuming. But these are pretty low power consumers. So you'd probably get a minimum of a couple of hours run time.
    If you have the devices already, why not just test it out and find out your run times. Because, thats the only way your gonna have an "accurate" idea.
    The idea will work, and you could use it in the field.

    The Belkin is rated at 1200 VA and 670 W. Im sure someone can do the math if you can post the "watts" of each your devices. (as i forget the equations for estimating run time)
    Belkin Universal UPS (F6C120-UNV) (F6C120-UNV) UPS System Details and Product Specifications - Epinions.com


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    #3
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    The wireless mic receiver runs on 12V (160 mA)...so, that makes it draw 1.92W , I guess? What would be the running time, how can I calculate it?


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    #4
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    Feb 2005
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    Washington, the state.
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    The power required to run my 17" MBPro from an inverter can vary a lot depending on the charge state of the battery. The Apple MagSafe power supply is rated at 80 watts, and seems to use all of that when the battery is depleted. If the battery is full, it doesn't take much at all. Having said this, the charge amperage is high when first plugged in, and ramps down through the charging cycle.

    ohms law says Power (watts) = Volts x Amps. When you are running through an inverter, you lose some power in the exchange, call it 10% for arguments sake, so add that on the the amps after you calculate.

    80W = 12V x 6.6A (call it 7amps after the 10% is added) 7 amps continuous from a 12v battery source is quite a bit unless you have full sized deep cycle batteries A typical auto sized deep cycle battery (group 27) has about 100 amps of reserve. But to make the battery last, you should think about 50% duty cycle or about 50 amps of useful reserve and then recharge. I use my laptop when I RV, and charging a dead laptop from an inverter is a real battery killer. If my laptop is dead, a decent guess would be 15-20 amps to fully recharge. Don't know how big your ups is, but most of them are designed to give you an orderly shut down when the power goes out, so check your capacity.

    The moral of this story is; if you know you want to use your laptop on an inverter, start with a full charge, and use you laptop battery as a reserve when your ups is depleted.

    Grant


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    #5
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    Well, the UPS seemed like an ok idea but the mere fact it produces a irritatingly loud beep every 10 seconds when it runs on batteries makes me look for alternative ways


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