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    #11
    Senior Member arniepix's Avatar
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    I don't mind pointing out that when you see a movie projected from a DCP, every screening looks just as good as the 1st time it was shown in that theater. There's no buildup of dirt or scratches. When you see a film print, every screening causes wear on the print, and after a few dozen screenings, you can see a lot of dirt & scratches.

    This is going to effect a lot of smaller theaters that haven't yet changed over to digital. It will either force them to buy new projectors (& screens if they want to show 3D) or it will drive some of them out of business when they can't get prints of the next big event film.

    BTW, I was at a panel discussion at my favorite art house this morning (http://www.filmforum.org/) where the programmers were asked about digital vs. film. They all agreed that it's not a question of digital vs. film, it's about what the best copy of each particular film is. Some films are only available to them digitally, or they may have a choice between a bad print and a good DCP, or a bad DCP and a good print. They want choose the best copy of a film that they can get, regardless of the format.
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    #12
    Senior Member Grug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arniepix View Post
    I don't mind pointing out that when you see a movie projected from a DCP, every screening looks just as good as the 1st time it was shown in that theater. There's no buildup of dirt or scratches. When you see a film print, every screening causes wear on the print, and after a few dozen screenings, you can see a lot of dirt & scratches.

    This is going to effect a lot of smaller theaters that haven't yet changed over to digital. It will either force them to buy new projectors (& screens if they want to show 3D) or it will drive some of them out of business when they can't get prints of the next big event film.

    BTW, I was at a panel discussion at my favorite art house this morning (http://www.filmforum.org/) where the programmers were asked about digital vs. film. They all agreed that it's not a question of digital vs. film, it's about what the best copy of each particular film is. Some films are only available to them digitally, or they may have a choice between a bad print and a good DCP, or a bad DCP and a good print. They want choose the best copy of a film that they can get, regardless of the format.
    It is quite an interesting point. Most of the 'arthouse' cinemas down here (the one's that build most of their screenings around showing older, much loved, films) are only able to acquire most of their films on Blu-ray these days. Which means that digital projection is essential for showing these older films.


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