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    #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex H. View Post
    Honestly? Sinking $2k into a mic isn't going to compensate for lack of knowledge. Start with the DVD I linked above.
    Purchased. Mind giving me tips until it arrives? I have two questions.

    1) How and when to use furnipads.

    2) In production, what's the best way to record the sound of another person's voice at the other end of a phone call? I can't find an example to show you. But the first thing that comes to mind is to have one person speaking into a phone speaker, and recording the audio with a mic placed closely to the phone of the other person.


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    #12
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    29 seconds in. I'd like to record a phone call with that sound quality.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wkqo_Rd3_Q


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    #13
    Sound Ninja Noiz2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zander Burstein View Post
    ...Just saw the last episode of Game of Thrones and there was a scene where one character (Margery Tyrell) was walking with another character (Little Finger) outside through a camp full of activity. Would the MKH416 be used in this situation? The dialogue was flawless, and even though I know the other actors were probably miming the talking, the dialogue was so crisp and clean even with an extensive amount of activity going on around them.
    You need to remember post when you look at finished films. All of that sound or nearly all of it was added after the shoot. They may well have laved the actors. If it is clear that a boom could not have gotten close they probably did. Or they may have used lavs booms and plant mics.

    But all activity on a budgeted production is made as quiet as possible. And it's a lot more possible than most people think. Shoes are padded, props are made so that they will not clink etc. Then really good dialog editing gets rid of everything else. They may pull words or syllables from other takes to "fix" problems. If you hear a typical dialog track after the dialog editors have finished you would think the thing was recorded on a sound stage.

    It starts with great production but that gets heavily polished by a small army of professionals in post.
    Cheers
    SK


    Scott Koue
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    Bugín out of Babylon



    ďIt ainít ignorance that causes all the troubles in this world, itís the things that people know that ainít soĒ

    Edwin Howard Armstrong
    creator of modern radio


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    #14
    Sound Ninja Noiz2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zander Burstein View Post

    2) In production, what's the best way to record the sound of another person's voice at the other end of a phone call? I can't find an example to show you. But the first thing that comes to mind is to have one person speaking into a phone speaker, and recording the audio with a mic placed closely to the phone of the other person.
    Record both as cleanly as you can and deal with it in post.

    The reason is you can tune it to sound "right" where if you recorded it built in there is no undoing it later.

    In post you may play it through a phone if you want. That is a tried and true technique. You can also use things like "speaker phone" from Audio Ease.
    Cheers
    SK


    Scott Koue
    Web Page
    Noiz on Noise
    Bugín out of Babylon



    ďIt ainít ignorance that causes all the troubles in this world, itís the things that people know that ainít soĒ

    Edwin Howard Armstrong
    creator of modern radio


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    #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noiz2 View Post
    Record both as cleanly as you can and deal with it in post.

    The reason is you can tune it to sound "right" where if you recorded it built in there is no undoing it later.

    In post you may play it through a phone if you want. That is a tried and true technique. You can also use things like "speaker phone" from Audio Ease.
    Alright. I thought that there might be a trick to use in production, but if you say post, I'll just give it to them clean.


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    #16
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    After watching that video that Alex linked above, I have a better understanding of the differences of shotguns and hypercardioid mic's, but it did not help me in choosing a more recently popular hypercardioid. (It's an older video) I'd love to hear people's experiences with different microphones and what you guys recommend. Specifically hypers.


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