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    Best way to make Colors pop?
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    I'm going to be doing a new project, and what I really want is to make the colors pop. It will be a small music video and I just wanted to get some tips on things I can do to make the colors pop?

    Normally I always shoot with contrast down as well as sharpness then convert to pro res lt & edit in FCP. What I noticed though is when trying to color correct the footage doesn't hold up to well.... Has anybody just shot their look in camera and not do any color correction? Could it be a certain lens I need to use? I know macro lenses are great for detailsm is this something I should look too?

    Or maybe is it lighting, what is the best lighting to really make colors pop using these Canon dslrs?

    Thanks


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    Section Moderator Alex H.'s Avatar
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    1) Set and wardrobe design, and makeup. These should dance together to create, and to enhance, the color scheme that you want in the end. Pale colors won't give you much if you want a saturated look.

    2) Lighting. The only times I've seen big problems with ProRes LT footage (or other HD codecs, for that matter) not holding together so well is in places where lighting was insufficient. Yes, it's a DSLR. Yes, it can use faster lenses to shoot in lower light. No, this is not a replacement for lots of light. Remember that the amount of lighting and grip gear packed in a truck (or two) for a big-budget motion picture can be mind-boggling, but even when the final product looks "low-light", it was shot with tons of light and graded later.

    3) Proper color correction and grading. Correct first, grade later. Assuming your footage was well-lit and properly-exposed, you'll have enough information there to get what you want. Any footage, however, can be pushed too far. Items 1 and 2 above will help make sure that you don't have to push the saturation so far as to destroy your footage in the name of bright colors.

    I'm not a fan of shooting for a look in-camera. There may be some who disagree, but you're pretty much stuck with what you've got when you shoot that way. That goes especially for drastic looks. Shoot for proper lighting and exposure, and then pull what you need out of it later.
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    Senior Member keylight's Avatar
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    Take a bunch of old plastic film canisters and fill them with different paint colors. Add a firecracker to each - poking a hole in the lids for the fuses. Light them, throw them, and a moment later you'll have some real popping colors.

    Oh, wait..... I see what you're asking......

    When I'm certain about the look I'm trying to achieve (which is always a good thing before starting production), then I do as much of it in camera as possible. It'll save time in post and end up looking great.


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    Senior Member Samuel H's Avatar
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    * if you shoot with CineStyle, use higher saturation (e.g. +2); to me, the standard value leads to noise and macroblocking even if you don't push the footage too hard
    * even better: use Flaat_2
    * James0b57 is in the "get your look in camera" camp, if he doesn't come here you can find him in this thread: http://www.dvxuser.com/V6/showthread...the-PSE/page23


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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex H. View Post
    2) Lighting. The only times I've seen big problems with ProRes LT footage (or other HD codecs, for that matter) not holding together so well is in places where lighting was insufficient. Yes, it's a DSLR. Yes, it can use faster lenses to shoot in lower light. No, this is not a replacement for lots of light. Remember that the amount of lighting and grip gear packed in a truck (or two) for a big-budget motion picture can be mind-boggling, but even when the final product looks "low-light", it was shot with tons of light and graded later.
    Excellent advice for all projects.


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    Thanks for the tips, now my question is regarding Macro lenses. I might be looking to rent the latest 100mm Macro Is lens. Any thoughts on the quality you can achieve when focusing on certain items?


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    Senior Member jambredz's Avatar
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    agree with Alex. Also Norman...i shoot all my Music video and Commercial advertisements where I want popping colours, with variation of Cinestyle. Saturation, contrast and sharpness turned up to my liking.


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