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    Auditions without lines?
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    Senior Member Azmyth's Avatar
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    How do you normally audition actors for characters that don't have lines? I have one that has no lines, but does some very emotionally intense scenes. How do you audition actors for that?
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    Junior Member Braedon's Avatar
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    Tears, Facial expressions, and more tears.

    EDIT: Sorry, I thought you were talking about how to audition for that role, haha.

    Try to get them immersed in the story, It has to feel real to them or they won't be able to act it out perfectly.
    Last edited by Braedon; 01-12-2012 at 04:01 PM.


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    Senior Member Ted Spencer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azmyth View Post
    How do you normally audition actors for characters that don't have lines? I have one that has no lines, but does some very emotionally intense scenes. How do you audition actors for that?
    Have them play the scene in question, or part of it, in the audition. Actors have to do non-dialog scenes all the time, frequently including very emotional ones. If they're reasonably well trained/experienced, they'll be fine with it. Fear not.

    If you need to direct them in the audition though (which is likely), remember *not* to say things like "be more emotional" or whatever (aka "result-oriented" directing). Instead, simply try to help them fully understand and feel the ramifications of the 'story moment' they're in in the scene, and then let them find their emotional 'life' in it by whatever means they use (actors have widely divergent processes for this). If their performance is insufficiently (or excessively) emotional it basically just means that they don't understand the intended 'weight' of the moment. Helping them to do so usually solves the problem. As long as they've got enough ability... : )
    Last edited by Ted Spencer; 01-12-2012 at 10:48 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Spencer View Post
    If you need to direct them in the audition though (which is likely), remember *not* to say things like "be more emotional" or whatever (aka "result-oriented" directing).
    Not that this is BAD advice, but...
    in my experience, it often leads to more problems than it solves. I've found, generally, that actors aren't stupid... they're professionally trained for this kind of thing, and every single time they've been far better able to come up with what i'm looking for themselves with my direction, even if it's result-oriented, than if i try and figure out secret actor-speak code. If SOMEONE has to take result-oriented speak and translate it to emotional feeling... I'd rather it be the person who's giving the emotions. I've never had an actor "shut down" because I told them I needed them to look more pissed off. They generally know what that means.
    (sorry for the side-note... and as always, YMMV, I just feel like a lot of actors get a bad rap when these discussions start)


    Quote Originally Posted by Azmyth View Post
    How do you normally audition actors for characters that don't have lines? I have one that has no lines, but does some very emotionally intense scenes. How do you audition actors for that?
    If it were me and not speaking was causing a problem with the audition (different story if you can just do the scene and they can audition it without speaking), I would probably pick a scene similar to what I want, with dialogue, and have them audition that. That way, not only do you get to see how they do, you also give them a solid idea of what you're looking for.
    Or if you're just looking for how they take direction... they all have a monologue prepared! I've never found a reason to have an actor give me their monologue, but this might be a good chance to have them take something they've prepared and change it as per your direction.


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    I'm casting a part for the narrative portion of a music video, any ideas on what I should have the perspective actor do in the audition?


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    Senior Member paulears's Avatar
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    At auditions, especially theatrical auditions for certain subjects, the director will give them a scenario, tell them the character's background and let them at it. They will be happy saying MORE emotion, MORE anger, LESS movement, MORE face - as said, actors if they've been trained will understand what the director wants. Some, who don't subscribe to the Brechtian, method style approach don't actually want to know the entire story, and just inject what seems right to them? Seems to work. Director asks, they do.


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