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    real life examplex of audio recording?
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    Where can I find video examples of audio recording in movies?
    I've always asked myself how they can record audio in some odd situations. Example: wide shot with camera very distant from the subject. The actor is in a bath suit so no clothes to hide the lavalier near the actor mouth so how do they record audio in an open space where a boom mic is impossible to use and the sound (not only the dialogue) is not added in post?

    Thank you
    Last edited by -Sandro-; 01-02-2012 at 04:08 PM.


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    Sound Ninja Noiz2's Avatar
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    First your assumption that sound was not added in post is probably wrong. Any commercial film after the first few years of "talkies" has had sound added in post.

    So the answer is probably A) ADR, B) a plant mic, C) boom with a matt shot for the BG.
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    You could always use one of these


    For Sale: Sound Devices 552 Mixer/Recorder - http://www.dvxuser.com/V6/showthread...post1986383562


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    Quote Originally Posted by Noiz2 View Post
    First your assumption that sound was not added in post is probably wrong. Any commercial film after the first few years of "talkies" has had sound added in post.

    So the answer is probably A) ADR, B) a plant mic, C) boom with a matt shot for the BG.
    I think B could be the answer


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    D) Dialog editing.


    For Sale: Sound Devices 552 Mixer/Recorder - http://www.dvxuser.com/V6/showthread...post1986383562


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    Plant mics can work, sometimes. The problem is unless you can get the plant mic close enough to the talent to get a decent signal to bg ratio, then you're still dealing with too much room sound in the dialog. Plant mics work best in sound dampened environments such as sound stages or tv studios. Even living rooms or bedrooms with lots of soft goods around can help. For the scene you described (bathtub, bathroom, wide shot where sound blankets would have to far back from the sound source), I'd bet on one of two approaches: Get the dialog during a close up, even if in the final cut they use the long shot, or ADR. In these shots, I often ask the AD if I can get wild lines with the boom right after a camera take. This sometimes saves the day.

    Quote Originally Posted by -Sandro- View Post
    I think B could be the answer


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    Sorry! Typo, I meant he was wearing a bathing suit not suite!
    What's the most used way to record audio? It seems to me that lavalier mics can basically cover every* situation ? Why bother using boom mics ?


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    There are three inherent problems with lavs:

    1. Typically, the actor is moving and therefore requires a wireless pack. Even the best wireless rigs are prone to the occasional drop-out or RF hit.

    2. Placing lavs on talent in such a way as to be hidden and at the same time not experience clothing rustle takes practice and experience. Typically on set I'm allowed somewhere around 2-3 minutes for each actor to wire them, set level, dress cable, and clear up any clothing noise problems. As a location sound mixer, I may or may not be allowed to participate in wardrobe discussion, and are often faced with silk and sythetics which sound like sandpaper without application of moleskin and strategically placed toupe tape.

    3. Most importantly, lavs have a close-up sound which does not sound as natural as a properly positioned boom.

    I personally prefer the sound of a boom used correctly. However, more and more I'm working with directors who are choosing not to shoot close-ups at all for some dialog scenes, and I'm slowly having to embrace the idea of lav only shots. As a result, I am sometimes running as many as 7 channels of wireless lav and because no matter what you do, you may still get RF hits and clothing rustle, each lav has to be tracked to a separate recording channel.


    Quote Originally Posted by -Sandro- View Post
    Sorry! Typo, I meant he was wearing a bathing suit not suite!
    What's the most used way to record audio? It seems to me that lavalier mics can basically cover every* situation ? Why bother using boom mics ?


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    #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Sandro- View Post
    Where can I find video examples of audio recording in movies?
    I've always asked myself how they can record audio in some odd situations. Example: wide shot with camera very distant from the subject. The actor is in a bath suit so no clothes to hide the lavalier near the actor mouth so how do they record audio in an open space where a boom mic is impossible to use and the sound (not only the dialogue) is not added in post?
    They can always put the lav. mic. in the hair. Can't see it, close enough to mouth. As long as the actor has one side of the body that doesn't face the camera, you can tape the body pack to them (for wireless), or you can tape the cables down their body to the floor (for wired). Not the most elegant solution maybe. But it's been done.


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    #10
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    I've talked with sounc mixers that did nude scenes where a sennheiser SK5012 (which was the smallest transmitter at the time) was taped to the back of the actor's neck and the lav was hidden in the hair. They were shooting wide and tight at the same time, so a boom didn't work so well. Every scene is going to be different and can call for a different approach, so it's best to be armed with all the tools you can have to get the best sound possible.
    David Fisk
    Sales Manager
    K-Tek/M. Klemme Technology Corp.
    dave@ktekbooms.com


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