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    #11
    Canon DSLR Moderator M. Gilden's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Davis View Post
    - no rocker zoom and no ability to do a zooming shot. Still lenses cannot physically perform this shot. Cine zoom lenses can mount to canon DSLRs but it can be expensive (link)
    True there is no rocker zoom button, I suppose I could mention that. However the T3i does support a zoom of sorts by changing which pixels are being recorded on the sensor. I originally thought the so called "crop mode" just lets you change your FOV abruptly, but apparently it can be adjusted smoothly during a shot being recorded, essentially doing what one would expect a zoom to do on a camcorder (Check this out, from 02.50 onwards: http://vimeo.com/20420054)
    Also, I've used the zoom barrel of my Tamron during a shot to establish the size of a room after starting zoomed in- Even used the barrel of my Nikon E series 75-150mm to make a sudden jump in zoom to simulate the mockumentary style for a spoof video (we were going for the style they shoot "Modern Family" with).
    I don't really feel like zooms are impossible or even really missing, however I'm admittedly not a fan of zooming in the first place.

    I also noticed you stated your preference for shooting with vintage lenses and for shooting primes over zooms. I would like to make some points that go against the grain here but I feel they are very valid and were born from my own experience over the last 2 years of shooting with video DSLR's.

    The main disadvantage of shooting with vintage lenses happens on highly paid corporate gigs. Many clients are not as knowledgable about image as you and brands reassure them. Especially when they are paying you big money, modern EOS will prevent possible weird looks and questions that a grandfather lens will attract. Matteboxes are a big help too. A cheap cavision mattebox can help hide and dress up a vintage lens.
    Your point is valid, and you are welcome to voice it here!

    However, I personally disagree with name-brand lenses being of any help- I've found that taking out the DSLR in general already warrants the looks and measurable decline in client confidence. In fact, many of my clients told me they recognized the camera, having their own 7D or T2i for photographing their kids, completely unaware that this can be used for professional video. When I first started shooting with DSLR, I always brought a full sized cam DVX or HVX as a backup just to show I *DO* own and shoot with that gear as well.

    The irony is, actually, that having vintage glass has been a merit to my credibility on a shoot, not the opposite. This is mostly because they don't look the standard kinds of lenses these folks tend to see on modern SLR cameras.

    About 2 weeks ago I was recording an establishing shot of a building for a corporate video, and wanted to get some deep DOF between the foliage and the building. So, I chose my Nikon 75-150mm and set up outside. One of the folks that hired me came over and admired the lens (it has a very long barrel, and very distinct looking), and said something along the lines of "wow- that must be a special lens for video or something (while he watches me pull focus on the large wheel). Guess that's why my <insert HD capable DSLR here> doesn't take good video like yours". If I were out there with the Kit Lens or some popular recognizable Canon lens associated with stills, I think it would have hurt my credibility instead of the opposite (Hey, I've got that camera at home! Hey, and that lens!).

    The main advantage of shooting with zooms over primes is speed and safety, especially in narrative and commercial work. Speed because you are not moving your whole tripod when the client asks you to adjust the frame to include or exclude things. Safety because when you are exhausted at the end of a 14 hour shoot and you are still changing lenses its easier to get a rear element scratched or find someone has bumped the table that is holding your primes. The less lens changes you can engineer the safer your gear is going to be.
    There is a LOT of truth to that, granted.

    Again, the t3i lets you get around this (and will be a standard feature on all Canons that come afterwards most likely, since that appears to be how canon rolls out features).
    But in general, primes are often preferred because they are available in faster and sharper varieties. If you have a few spare moments to set up and frame your shot, they can yield fantastic looking imagery. But in live event type situation (sports, wedding, etc), getting the framing and FOV that you want is often more important. It really depends on what you are shooting- but for narratives and commercial work, it would appear that many prefer primes (myself included). Its a personal taste I suppose.

    Just last week, I did a short interview with someone in their home for a network TV talk show (will be airing on CBS), shot it on a 50mm F/1.4 Nikkor. And yes- I *DID* have to move it around a lot to frame the shot that I needed. But, I also had to adjust and move the lights, reflectors, etc... Everyone accepted that as normal, its just what you have to do to get a great looking image.
    Most of the folks I work with who are regulars in the production world seem to take this as a given as well- apparently most folks that shoot with film use prime lenses traditionally as well.

    So, yes, I hear your concern, the point is that video cameras will always be more convenient for things like that if they are important to you.

    Quote Originally Posted by J Davis View Post
    To be accurate you might want to reword this to says The Panasonic GH1 was the first to offer 24p, then six months later came the 7D then later still the 5D magic lantern then 5D firmware update allowed 24p. The 7D was however the first to offer the combo of 24p with HDMI out.

    Also for note the t1i shoots video at 1080p 20 fps and 720p at 30 fps. This is a very useful, inexpensive and currently the only way to get undercranking on a DSLR. For example if you shoot a fight scene at 20fps and recorform to 24 then all your actors will be moving quicker. A t1i is dirt cheap on craigslist as no one wants to shoot video on them for lack of 24p.
    Interesting about the GH1- that may be true, although this section is about Canon so I didn't compare them (I personally think the GH2 is pretty cool and worth a mention as well, but beyond the scope of this section). It is curious that the Canons took off as the standard in HD video if the GH1 had those modes first (and its not just because of HDMI out, since the 5D also is far more ubiquitous than the GH1/2).
    Either way, I do mention that there are options like the Panasonic series in the thread comparing models, as well as mentioning the T1i already there. I did actually use the T1i once to compliment an interview (was shot in B&W at 20fps and hand-held for an interesting close up side angle; it gave a rather edgy in-your-face look). Still, not recommended much for video any more than the 1D (which also an excellent camera, but not popular for HDV).
    Last edited by M. Gilden; 06-03-2011 at 12:56 PM.

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    #12
    Senior Member Zxander34's Avatar
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    Gilden-what type of adapter do you use for your nikon lenses?
    Gh2, Canon FD set from 24-85mm and 14mm panasonic.


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    #13
    Canon DSLR Moderator M. Gilden's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zxander34 View Post
    Gilden-what type of adapter do you use for your nikon lenses?
    I have a couple of them- first one I bought was a Bower, kind of pricey at $40+ but back then I wasn't sure if I would like the look of vintage glass, so I wanted to buy from a local shop where I could return it.
    I never wanted to return it. Its an excellent adapter and very well built. Easily goes on and off the lens.

    After that, I bought a cheap Fotodiox adapter for my other lenses since it got glowing reviews from other users. I gotta be honest, I'm not nearly as impressed with that one. I actually had a really difficult time getting it on the lens at first (had to almost force it to the point I thought I was breaking something), and then had difficulty removing it. But, to be fair it was about 1/3rd the price of the Bower.

    Bottom line: I like the smoothness of the Bower enough that I'm keeping it. If I borrow someone's lens, its real easy to quickly snap off the current lens and on the borrowed one and vice versa. But, if I were buying more right now I'd go Fotodiox, because at the end of the day, its a simple mechanical adapter that I generally just leave attached to the lens. Once on, it works and there's really no reason to fuss with it or buy an expensive one. Also I could buy 3 of them for the same price!

    I'm going to add this to the first page.

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    #14
    Senior Member Zxander34's Avatar
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    Thanks! I can't wait to get into the vintage lens game.
    Gh2, Canon FD set from 24-85mm and 14mm panasonic.


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    #15
    Senior Member jambredz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zxander34 View Post
    Thanks! I can't wait to get into the vintage lens game.
    you will become an addict. be warned


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    #16
    Senior Member Zxander34's Avatar
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    Plus, I find that Nikon glass is the most versatile and has the longest life span comparatively.

    An investment worthwhile.
    Gh2, Canon FD set from 24-85mm and 14mm panasonic.


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    #17
    Senior Member Zxander34's Avatar
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    What about the Sigma 17-50mm F2.8 in regards to video?

    Gh2, Canon FD set from 24-85mm and 14mm panasonic.


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    #18
    Canon DSLR Moderator M. Gilden's Avatar
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    I don't have one so I can't comment, but check the lens section.

    Making movies, and the internet a happier place.
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