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    #31
    Member bleach551's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by latyshev View Post
    A bit of a beginners guide TBH.
    More or less, Would you happen to have an advanced guide that You could post?


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    #32
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    The d7000 pretty much is the same as any other video Dslr. You use it as how you would use any other Dslr to make videos.... There are only a few exceptions that make the d7000 different. Let's all post experiences and tips/tricks to make a guide.

    #1. Aperture can not be controlled in livemode with "G" glass. You have to exit live mode, set aperture. Then go back into live mode. Not a deal breaker but it is cumbersome. That or use glass with an aperture ring.

    #2. Nikon d7000 does not have any camera profiles/settings for video. It uses the same profiles as stills. So if you plan on doing post color grading, you should use neutral color profile with sharpening and contrast turned all the way down.

    #3. In live mode, there is no metering bar. You have to judge by looking at the output on the screen. That or exit live mode, adjust exposure in viewfinder and return back to live mode. There is also no live view histogram. If this is vital, you'd have to take a picture and review the picture to check histogram.

    Everyone feel free to add to this list. That's all I can think of that's for the d7000. Any other tidbits of info is just general Dslr video info.
    Last edited by Soymilk; 06-08-2011 at 09:40 PM.


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    #33
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    Soymilk,

    Thanks for posting this info. When this thread was started I originally sent a P.M. to original poster of the Ebook "Nikon D7000: From snapshot to Great shots" because I thought that it would be a Copyright infringement to do so directly on this board. This was an Ebook I purchased when I was thinking of replacing my Canon 7D with the Nikon D7000. However, I decided to keep my 7D and wait for the replacement for the D300s(D400, D350..etc) to be released later this year. I think somewhere along the way I was seen as having more knowledge of the D7000 than I actually do, I HAVE NO EXPERIENCE AT ALL WITH THE D7000. Your post will go a long way in helping all of the new owners of the D7000.

    What I did learn in my limited research on the D7000 is that it achieves its highest Dynamic Range, Believed to better than any other mid level DSLR's, at it lowest ISO setting but I believe this is true of all DSLR's. The lower the ISO the greater the Dynamic range, the higher the ISO the lower the Dynamic Range

    http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/eng...rs/Nikon/D7000 "Click on Dynamic Range Tab"

    the ISO also seems to affect "Tonal Range" and "Color Sensitivity" as well
    Last edited by bleach551; 06-08-2011 at 08:14 PM.


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    #34
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    Although it has awesome dynamic range, you have to deal with so much compromises to use it as a viable video camera. I think nikon has made it clear this is a still camera with gimped video. They are really behind the curve with video compared to panasonic/canon.

    As with the 5dmk ii, I'm hoping for a new firmware that gives the same functionality for video as canon cameras.

    As for dynamic range, I would imagine it depends on the base iso as well. D7000 has a base iso of 100. Some cameras have their base iso at 200. Anything lower than the base iso will also result in lower dynamic range.

    Bleach, is there any particular reason why youre wanting to switch to nikon?

    P.s. There seems to be a guide for how to shoot videos on the d7000 a few posts down. Duh'oh.
    Last edited by Soymilk; 06-08-2011 at 09:44 PM.


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    #35
    Member bleach551's Avatar
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    I realize that. I decided it must be okay to post it directly on the board. I thought the moderators would have taken down by now so, hey, it must be okay then. the reason I want to switch to nikon is that I have been using all Nikon manual focus lenses ( 28mm f2.8 ais, 50mm f1.8 ais, 85mm f2 ais, 105mm f2.5 ais and 135mm f2.8 ais ) on my Canon 7D with Fotodiox Nikon to Eos adapters. I also got a chance to use a friend's D300s to shoot a few photos and I loved shooting with it and the color and resolution of the photos much better than what I was getting out of my 7D with the Nikon lens attached. I liked the slightly wider F.O.V. and shallower DOF of my lenses with the Nikon d300s and preferred the 1.53X crop factor of the D300s over the 1.6x Crop factor of the 7D. Also I absolutely hate the Moire and Aliasing the 7D exhibits in deep focus shoots and hoped that the replacement for the d300s would have better video capabilities, due to the speculation that Nikon would replace the sensor with either a newly developed Sony originating sensor or a New Nikon In-house manufactured sensor.

    I also shoot with a Kowa 2x anamorphic lens for Bell and Howell and the 52mm filter thread of the Nikons are a perfect fit for the 52mm threaded anamorphic lens clamp I use to retain and properly align the Kowa with . here is a sample if you are interested:

    Last edited by bleach551; 06-09-2011 at 12:36 AM.


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    #36
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    If you're worried about moire in 7D video, you won't find a solution in the D7000 - it's about the same for moire/aliasing. Like the Canons, the video is downsampled from the sensor by skipping lines, which is basically a rubbish approach but computationally cheap. The only DSLR which currently has less of a moire issue is the Panasonic GH2, which of course will also take your Nikon lenses via an adaptor... but the crop factor is more like 2 (I think a little lower for video? It's 2 for stills). The GH2 is a decent stills camera, but received wisdom is that it's not up there with the 7D or D7000.

    Whichever way you go you'll find a compromise. I love my D7000 for stills, and I enjoy shooting video on it, but there's a long way to go before video is a first-class citizen in this class of camera. Sadly, I don't expect Nikon to get there first.


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    #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanS View Post
    If you're worried about moire in 7D video, you won't find a solution in the D7000 - it's about the same for moire/aliasing.....

    Jonathan,

    Which is the reason I passed on the D7000, It seemed to have just as much moire and aliasing as my 7D.

    I have seen very good things about the GH2. The audio controls of the GH2 are better than my 7D and I believe that there downsampling method of the sensor is much better implemented than that of the 7D, which is why the GH2's images seem to have less moire and aliasing. The GH2 does offer a wide selection of lens options due to its micro 4/3rds flange distance, however, the crop factor was what led me away from it .

    I thought I heard mentioned that the actual crop factor was somewhere around 1.8X to 1.9X , even so , the way I shot makes my 135mm barely useful to me on my 1.6x cropped sensor 7D. I can't imagine using a more cropped sensored camera. I love the perspective ( the way the lens renders the relationship between foreground and background) of the Nikon 135mm lens but I just rarely use it because of its F.O.V. on a 1.6x Cropped camera. Also, It seems to be more expensive to go wider, F.O.V wise, on a GH2 than on the Nikon or Canon cropped sensored cameras.

    Don't forget, Nikon was the company that started the whole DSLR revolution with the D90 and that Canon, Panasonic and Sony were all late responders . I believe that both Nikon and Canon's primary market is the stills Photographer and that the newly developed video segment is still a distance second, however, I don't think it's a segment that they can or will ignore for too long and that they know that they will have to further develop their video segment or be left behind. I also believe that once Canon, Panasonic, Sony...etc enter a market segment They seem to take it over, however I not going to write off Nikon as a potential future DSLR innovator just yet.
    Last edited by bleach551; 06-09-2011 at 10:14 AM.


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    #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by bleach551 View Post
    I have sent you a P.M.
    Could you please send me the information as well?


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    #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by bleach551 View Post
    This might get taken down but here you go.

    "Nikon D7000: from snapshots to great shots"


    http://www.filesonic.com/file/103258...reat_Shots.pdf
    Quote Originally Posted by bleach551 View Post
    use "free account" or "slow download" to download. I can't remember which, since its my account, everything downloads for me automatically so I forgot what you guys might see when you arrive at the filesonic web page.
    posted on 3rd page


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    #40
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    You can reduce the appearance of moire by lowering in-camera sharpness and by applying chroma noise reduction. You'll still have moire leftover, but it won't be as noticeable since it'll be softer and won't be continually changing color.


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