Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. Collapse Details
    Tamron 17-50 vc vs. non VC . Big difference?
    #1
    Senior Member jambredz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    kingston, Jamaica
    Posts
    3,978
    Default
    I know the non VC version is pretty sharper than the VC version, but does this matter for video??


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #2
    Default
    i'd like some input on this too... is vc needed or have we decided for video we don't want that now?


    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #3
    Senior Member jambredz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    kingston, Jamaica
    Posts
    3,978
    Default
    Well my issue wasn't the VC cus that's always good. I have the VC version because this was my first lens and didn't shoot with hdslr's before. Most had advised VC. However after shooting for some time with my manual primes (50mm and 28), my 50 manual prime being more telephoto as a its full frame so cropped in the 7d essentially giving 80mm field of view as opposed to 50 on the tamron, iv found I don't need VC under about 100mm. Some people need it though, not me.

    The issue is that the non VC version is much sharper. So I was thinking about trying to sell this lens and pick up the non VC version...but being that its video I was wondering if one can see the sharpness difference since video doesn't resolve as much as stills.


    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #4
    Default
    I don't know the answer to your question but I do think maybe your question should be: Am I satisfied with the Tamron 17-50VC?

    Not sure if thinking of your 50mm prime "being more telephoto" is helpful. You may wish to compare 50mm on the Tamron to it.

    Are you satisfied with the results of shooting with the Tamron without VC? Based on what Barry has said about the kit lenses and their use in video, I'd hazard the guess that only stills would show a difference in sharpness between the VC and non-VC versions. And hey, you may find yourself in a situation that calls for VC.

    Or you can come take a vacation in Israel and we'll trade lenses for a week or so.




    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    14
    Default
    The answer to your question about higher sharpness for non VC version making a difference in video relative to VC version of the Tamron 17-50mm is; there is no discernable difference. I owned the non vc version and upgraded to the VC version. The extreme corners are a little softer with VC version, but only when viewing still images at 100 % in lightroom. For video, the VC version works very well. In fact I am very happy with it for 18mega pixel stills also.
    Rick


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #6
    Senior Member jambredz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    kingston, Jamaica
    Posts
    3,978
    Default
    Hey thanks guys. I'll stick to my VC version


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #7
    Default
    I have the non vc.

    Greatfor stills but...

    For video, stabilized lenses are worth its weight in gold.

    I'll be happy to trade a little sharpness for a steady image.

    For that reason I didn't get rid of my stabilzed kit zoom lens.

    My tripod broke during a wedding shoot... grabbed the kit lense instead of my 50mm zeiss... and am I glad. Video came out great.

    While my Zeiss might be a little sharper, the micro jitters from my hands would have cancelled out that advantage. Be happy with vc.


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    #8
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by berylium View Post
    For video, stabilized lenses are worth its weight in gold.

    I'll be happy to trade a little sharpness for a steady image.
    +1 to that.

    Cause we're not always on sticks, and even if we are it might be gusty, etc. etc. Jitter and jello can ruin a shot just as nicely as being out of focus.
    Steve Dent - 3D Animator / Editor / Lens Enthusiast
    www.espacesteve.com


    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
    #9
    Default
    really it worth?
    i thought VC version is worst for panning and scrolling on video. Some peoplay says to turn it off for video in order to get more smooth motion.


    My only dubt is about photo. Really it works on this short focal distance in some situation.
    Somebody makes any test with VC on and off in critical situation? (low light, night.. etc)


    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
    #10
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by jambredz View Post
    I know the non VC version is pretty sharper than the VC version, but does this matter for video??
    I went for the sharper non VC. Between the weight of the lens and the 60D it's twice as smooth as the lighter 550D and 18-55 with IS. You should figure out a way to keep your camera steady without VC or IS.
    The principle of mass one key factor. Try adding a small amount of weight to the camera as an experiment to see what the effect is. Added weight will automatically smooth out your camera movements. It's the law of physics working for you.

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/mass.html

    Also try adding something with length to the camera like a tabletop tripod or monopod as a handle which will restrict micro movements by increasing the size to leverage ratio. Simple principles like this will help you understand why the camera shakes in the first place and how to correct it.
    When I have nothing else I use the camera hanging on the neck strap and push it with a little pressure away from me at low, medium, or high angles. This strap has 2 connections to the body, right and left which restrict horizontal movements allowing you to hold your horizon level. This is the first principle of a steadycam, keeping a level horizon. That strap stabilizer is always on the camera ready to work with nothing else. Don't laugh until you've worked it for a while, it's a good technique for the DSLR form factor.
    Lens stabilization does work in some situations, but will not necessarily be a great shot or camera move.
    Tai-chi masters would have very smooth camera moves. Don't fight with your camera, move with it.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by ROCKMORE; 01-05-2011 at 03:33 PM.
    Michael Rockmore


    Reply With Quote
     

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •