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    #11
    Member 2062ad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Harris View Post
    We were about 90% foley and ADR as well.
    What is ADR?


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    #12
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    Automatic Dialogue Replacement - basically re-recording over the location dialogue in a controlled environment, typically a sound booth.


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    #13
    Member 2062ad's Avatar
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    thanks


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    #14
    Senior Member Gohanto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4100xpb View Post
    Automatic Dialogue Replacement - basically re-recording over the location dialogue in a controlled environment, typically a sound booth.
    Just a quick note, ADR is notoriously hard for actors (to match performance and sync), sound editors (to match sync), and sound mixers (to make it sound natural). Especially since most of the fest films don't even have sound editors or sound mixers, it's ALWAYS important to do everything you can to get the best location sound you can. And even on Hollywood films with the best actors and sound crew, ADR is still rarely perfect.
    I invented the "remove echo" audio filter. And only people that boom their actors closely get to use it.

    Alex Donkle - Sound Designer -


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    #15
    Senior Member Darkline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Harris View Post
    We were about 90% foley and ADR as well.
    Cool I never noticed, but that's a good thing right? Foley is meant to be invisible, otherwise you've done it wrong :-)


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    #16
    Joystick Member Richard J. Johnson's Avatar
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    I did no Foley on this fim. But I did a ton with Gathering Souls. I find it to be very fun. My kids like helping when they can.

    Canon 7D+Teddybear T-Finder+Tamron & Canon Glass+lighting+a bunch of other stuff+2 Beautiful Babies.

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    #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by gohanto View Post
    just a quick note, adr is notoriously hard for actors (to match performance and sync), sound editors (to match sync), and sound mixers (to make it sound natural). Especially since most of the fest films don't even have sound editors or sound mixers, it's always important to do everything you can to get the best location sound you can. And even on hollywood films with the best actors and sound crew, adr is still rarely perfect.
    +1


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    #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gohanto View Post
    Just a quick note, ADR is notoriously hard for actors (to match performance and sync), sound editors (to match sync), and sound mixers (to make it sound natural). Especially since most of the fest films don't even have sound editors or sound mixers, it's ALWAYS important to do everything you can to get the best location sound you can. And even on Hollywood films with the best actors and sound crew, ADR is still rarely perfect.
    Well maybe at this level of film making, when no one has the tools or the means to do it right. But Hollywood movies generally ADR almost every single line in the movie. I'd say the ADR techs have it down to an art and it's rarely imperfect.

    Just the other day, I was hanging out on the ADR stage at Green Hornet, watching Seth Rogen and Christophe Waltz do their lines. They were doing scenes that I thought sounded great in the cut with the live audio, but they were still re-recording the lines. The techs make it really easy for them to be able to reread their lines to picture too. Though, it's not like the actors don't have any experience in doing it. It's standard practice on studio films.

    But yes, in the indy/amateur world of film making where you don't have a sick ADR stage with ProTools/Avid playback in a sound booth for the actor, it's best to get the cleanest audio you can on set.


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    #19
    Eats with 2 Fists kurtmo's Avatar
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    Abducted was ~50% ADR and lots of foley.


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    #20
    Senior Member Gohanto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Manning View Post
    Well maybe at this level of film making, when no one has the tools or the means to do it right. But Hollywood movies generally ADR almost every single line in the movie. I'd say the ADR techs have it down to an art and it's rarely imperfect.

    Just the other day, I was hanging out on the ADR stage at Green Hornet, watching Seth Rogen and Christophe Waltz do their lines. They were doing scenes that I thought sounded great in the cut with the live audio, but they were still re-recording the lines. The techs make it really easy for them to be able to reread their lines to picture too. Though, it's not like the actors don't have any experience in doing it. It's standard practice on studio films.

    But yes, in the indy/amateur world of film making where you don't have a sick ADR stage with ProTools/Avid playback in a sound booth for the actor, it's best to get the cleanest audio you can on set.
    Yes, Hollywood does loop a lot of lines mostly because they can and always want the backup while mixing. But in most movies 80-90% of the dialog used in the final mix is production audio, even if they did loop the line.
    I invented the "remove echo" audio filter. And only people that boom their actors closely get to use it.

    Alex Donkle - Sound Designer -


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