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    #61
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    Highly recommended; probably the best lighting DVDs I've seen. Well structured and information dense (more so than the sound DVD). The chapters on different types of lighting equipment I found especially valuable. The way Macgregor used smoke was also very interesting. Probably the best explanation of three- or four-point lighting. From a practical point of view, this lighting course is a lot more useful than watching DVDs like Cinematographer Style or Visions of Light or No Subtitles Necessary or Light Keeps Me Company.

    The price is well worth it -- compare it to what you might pay for a weekend course on lighting.

    Three thoughts:

    -- Don't know if I agree with the idea that you must buy professional, because you then cry once when taking your wallet out, rather than crying every time you take out your non-professional light. I've functioned with cheap eBay lights for years -- there's hundreds of resources online about how to do lighting on a budget, and there's always something other than lighting screaming for you to spend money on it.

    -- Lighting more complex scenes/doing more complex lighting/going more into depth about cinematography -- I'd be very interested to see Barry and David teaching this.

    -- Would have loved to have learnt more about the thought process that goes into lighting different scenes -- everything from reading the script, discussing with director, to budgeting for lighting, challenges on set, etc. Obviously, the lighting breakdowns included do provide a heap of information, but I was hungry for more! If you subscribe to American Cinematographer, you get some of this stuff, but reading is a lot different from watching a DVD and actually seeing what happens when lights get switched on and off, and the trial and error that might go into properly lighting something. If Barry and David ever make another cinematography DVD, perhaps they could case study this sort of process -- maybe integrated (since in practice it always is integrated) with other cinematography considerations, like camera choice, camera movement, lens choice -- maybe even on to the grading.

    Warning: after you've seen these DVDs, you won't be able to read the words "David Jimmerson" without thinking of beards and MythBusters, even if the picture is trying to mislead you into thinking of Portal.

    Edit: A few pages back, David provides a link to reviews of the DVD. These reviews are worth reading, if you're in doubt about buying, or are wondering what you're going to get. They're pretty much all on the money, from my point of view.
    Last edited by Paper_bag; 02-21-2012 at 03:19 PM.


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    #62
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    Thanks for the great review!

    Just some quick response:

    -- Don't know if I agree with the idea that you must buy professional, because you then cry once when taking your wallet out, rather than crying every time you take out your non-professional light. I've functioned with cheap eBay lights for years -- there's hundreds of resources online about how to do lighting on a budget, and there's always something other than lighting screaming for you to spend money on it.
    The point we tried to get across was that the professional gear is designed for that sort of work, and you don't have to wrestle with it to get it to do what you need -- it already has the tools and the correct quality of light, with none of the compromise and jury-rigging you have to make when you adapt different kinds of lights to use on a set. Ultimately, you can get other kinds of lights to work, but it's a whole lot less of a hassle just to use gear which is designed to be used that way.


    -- Would have loved to have learnt more about the thought process that goes into lighting different scenes -- everything from reading the script, discussing with director, to budgeting for lighting, challenges on set, etc. If you subscribe to American Cinematographer, you get some of this information, but reading is a lot different from watching a DVD and actually seeing what happens when lights get switched on and off, and the trial and error that might go into properly lighting something. If Barry and David ever make another cinematography DVD, perhaps they could case study this sort of process -- maybe integrated (since in practice it always is integrated) with other cinematography considerations, like camera choice, camera movement, lens choice -- maybe even on to the grading.
    We did try to provide some of that with Jack and Macgregor when we broke down the short films. We could have done hours and hours on it, but we only had so much space. There's always a possibility of a follow-up.


    Warning: after you've seen these DVDs, you won't be able to read the words "David Jimmerson" without thinking of beards and MythBusters.
    That mustache fell to pieces shortly after and was given a burial with honors.

    (Though a bit of it survived to give me a Howie Mandel soul patch for . . . oh, let's not get ahead of ourselves here.)
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    #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by krizard View Post
    Does this course teach the basics, like 101, stuff like light types, the difference between them etc, or intermediate to advanced?
    The course is designed to very accessible to beginners, valuable for intermediates, and useful to pros as refreshers or quick reference.
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    #64
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    Having purchased this combo, I can attest that it was great. The portion on management of exposures especially the part about using the waveform monitor was incredible. That alone was worth the price of the set. It saved me a lot of trial and error.


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    Physical DVD clearance sale!
    #66
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    We're clearing out the final physical DVD stock of Lighting for Film and Television!

    Get the actual 3-DVD set for the blowout price of $69.95! (Does not include digital download.)

    The supply is limited
    , and Lighting for Film and Television will not be available on physical DVD again!



    (Reg. $109.95)
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    #67
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    I bought mine on Amazon yesterday. Can't wait until I can check it out.


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    #68
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    Thanks! Hope you enjoy. Let us know what you think!
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    #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Jimerson View Post
    Thanks! Hope you enjoy. Let us know what you think!
    I just finished it last night & it was a GREAT set! When it started with a Buffy spoof I knew right away this was going to be a great set for me. Whoever came up with that idea is awesome. lol. The two shorts were very cool & looked great. BTW, what camera was used for each of them (I heard a mention of a 35mm adapter I believe)? Some of the stuff I knew, but some I didn't and I definitely learned some important helpful things throughout. Sadly though, it really made me want some HMI lights even more...and they are pricey, but they are definitely great.

    Y'all did a great job with this set, so major kudos. Money well spent. Hope to check out the sound dvd next.


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    #70
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    Thanks for the review! The guy who came up with the Buffy sketch was the badly-then-well-lit-monster.
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