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    Does it matter if my first spec screenplay is high budget????
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    I am writing my first feature spec screenplay. From it i am hoping to find an agent with it. And then of course i would love to sell it.

    Hopefully if i am not totally deluded about my abilities something good could come from this. However it is what i would imagine to be a big budget film. It's a sci-fi action film, would absolutely include big set's, visual/cgi effects, etc.

    Lets just say, for the sake of this, that it is a good story, a nice read, etc. As a spec, and ofcourse, being an unknown writer, is it ok to have a big budget action sci-fi film or not?

    Anyone able to give me some advice about how the business works.

    I could go off and write a film with only three characters, set in one location, etc that would be very low budget (I imagine) but i have no real ideas for that right now. And i am already of tol a good start with writing this bigger budget one.


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    #2
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    Is this the first screenplay you're written or your first spec?
    "Your script was completely awful and was a chore to sit through. All of the characters were bland and uninspired. You have the concept down, but the execution needed alot of work. I would tear my eyes out if I ever saw this in theatres." - My friend after reading my script


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    #3
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    Well i'm not asking for advice how to write.

    Just the question i asked, thats all i need right now.


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    Senior Member Ted Spencer's Avatar
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    Please forgive me for putting it this way, but selling your first effort at writing a screenplay will be like winning the lottery, so I don't think it's going to make much difference what it contains where budget is concerned. I believe you will look back some day at that first script, like 99.9% of all writers do, and marvel at how little you knew about the craft when you wrote it. I've only written about six finished screenplays so far, plus about another dozen or so fairly well developed ideas/outlines for others, and with each one I appreciate more and more fully what I haven't learned to do well enough yet. It's a very humbling, two steps forward - one step back kind of process (the 'steps back' being the repeated newfound realizations of what I didn't know I didn't know).

    So I say unless you have plans in place to make the film within a given budget, go ahead and write whatever you like. If you succeed in selling it, whatever it is, you will be a very rare and fortunate person. If not, you will have advanced your learning of the craft, had an enjoyable time (no script I've ever written was as much fun as the first one - mainly because I had no idea how good it wasn't), and have something to show for your aspirations. many so-called 'writers' never finish a screenplay. Just doing so is actually quite an accomplishment.

    Hope this helps, and is not too discouraging...
    "Behind the shelter in the middle of a roundabout
    A pretty nurse is selling poppies from a tray
    And though she feels as if she's in a play
    She is anyway"

    From "Penny Lane" by Lennon/McCartney


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    Wow big surprise i didn't get an answer to my question again, as on most screenwriting boards.

    Firstly let me just say i am appreciative of the advice you have given me. I really am.

    But i am sick to death of people on this forum, and other screenwriting forums, who may be writers, but seem to have a complete inability to READ.

    Instead they answer a question that they 'wished' somebody had asked them. Instead of the 'actual' question that was asked.

    I never said this is the first time i have written a script.

    I re-inforced this when the first guy asked me that, and i said, quite CLEARLY, that i didn't, at this present time, want any information about 'how to write'.

    I asked about an unknown writer (which is what i am) and advice about the types of spec scripts, etc.




    I once asked on a directors board about the specific differences between two directors viewfinders on the market. They answered everything but that.

    "Hey kid, you need one of them."
    "Forget that, focus on storytelling"
    "Just look through the camera"
    "make a square with your fingers"

    Do you see my point?


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    #6
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    if your going action/sci-fi, don't consider budget.
    it's a good idea to have a backup plan, as in making another script made for a different market.
    either an entirely new story, or an altered version of the same story(or a different part of the story),
    like making a trilogy were one of the movies is not action oriented or only has one action sequence.


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    Moderator David Jimerson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhereDreamsAreBorn View Post
    Wow big surprise i didn't get an answer to my question again, as on most screenwriting boards.

    Firstly let me just say i am appreciative of the advice you have given me. I really am.

    But i am sick to death of people on this forum, and other screenwriting forums, who may be writers, but seem to have a complete inability to READ.

    Instead they answer a question that they 'wished' somebody had asked them. Instead of the 'actual' question that was asked.

    I never said this is the first time i have written a script.

    I re-inforced this when the first guy asked me that, and i said, quite CLEARLY, that i didn't, at this present time, want any information about 'how to write'.

    I asked about an unknown writer (which is what i am) and advice about the types of spec scripts, etc.




    I once asked on a directors board about the specific differences between two directors viewfinders on the market. They answered everything but that.

    "Hey kid, you need one of them."
    "Forget that, focus on storytelling"
    "Just look through the camera"
    "make a square with your fingers"

    Do you see my point?
    Actually, you did get an answer to your question, and also someone asking you to clarify what you're doing so that maybe they could help. Instead of reading and understanding for your own part, you chose hysterics both times.

    If people are willing to help, and they are, you have to meet them halfway and accept their help, even if that means it doesn't take exactly the form you're looking for.

    So, really, dude, calm down some and just go with it. Unpack the responses you get, and you'll find helpful intent and information. Also, give the question mark key a break.
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    #8
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    Answer to question "Big budget spec okay? If its good it doesn't matter.

    "Anyone give me any advice on how the business works?"
    What exactly are you asking? How to get an agent? How to get work?
    I can only tell you what worked for me.
    I had a stage play (tiny production) I'd written produced when I was 23, during rehearsals I was hired to work on a screenplay based on a unpublished novel. That was my first real screenwriting work. Other work fell in to place after that.

    I think Ted and RockmanX3 are trying to answer your questions.


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    #9
    Senior Member Ted Spencer's Avatar
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    You said it was your first feature script. There is a world of difference between writing a feature and any other form of script writing (shorts, docs, plays, etc.) so in most ways, in spite of your bitter complaints to the contrary, this *is* your first script. And you *will* have approximately a lottery-like chance of selling it as a spec. So the odds are 999,999 to 1 that *won't matter* what it'll cost to produce. That is your answer. You might as well be asking us what size yacht you should buy when the Powerball ticket you just bought comes up a winner. Seriously.

    When you ask an obviously naive question, don't be too surprised when you get treated accordingly...
    "Behind the shelter in the middle of a roundabout
    A pretty nurse is selling poppies from a tray
    And though she feels as if she's in a play
    She is anyway"

    From "Penny Lane" by Lennon/McCartney


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    #10
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    I think the answer to your first question is it doesn't matter what you write. At least not until you try to do something with it. What type of spec script you write will effect how and where you can market and use that script. But that is true of any type of creative work.

    Here is some (weak) data on selling spec scripts.

    http://www.deadline.com/2009/12/unof...ket-scorecard/

    I suspect if your end goal is to write large budget screenplays, it would be best to write spec scripts of that type. But don't expect your spec script to serve any other purpose than marketing your skills as a writer. Selling a spec script is not a high probability event.


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