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    #21
    Still "Senior Member" Gord.T's Avatar
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    Roomy dialog always makes me cringe right off the bat. It's the first thing I notice. I'd be interested in hearing about methods to improve that.
    "Remember To Dip the Right End of the Cigar in your $250.00 dollar glass of Brandy." -Doc Bernard.


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    #22
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    It's important to pay attention already during shooting, and during preproduction.

    Location hunting is VERY imported for sound, and actualy the sounddepartment is the first to be for location check up. Image can be "blocked in frame"...sound is 360 and a few feet and miles..

    During shooting, I would advice rather to do 1 more take which costs 5 minutes, then saying "we will fix in post", because that will take 5 hours sometimes to fix.
    SOUND EDITING - SOUND DESIGN - AND ALSO SOUNDRECORDING

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    #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raptor365 View Post
    Roomy dialog always makes me cringe right off the bat. It's the first thing I notice. I'd be interested in hearing about methods to improve that.

    add some reverb... add some roomnoise,
    SOUND EDITING - SOUND DESIGN - AND ALSO SOUNDRECORDING

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    #24
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    Are there actualy directors in here who first thougt sound was something "normal" ? And then they heard "ow...it isn't that "normal" actualy" ?
    SOUND EDITING - SOUND DESIGN - AND ALSO SOUNDRECORDING

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    #25
    Still "Senior Member" Gord.T's Avatar
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    In reference to my earlier post about too much room tone in dialog...

    Quote Originally Posted by dre83 View Post
    add some reverb... add some roomnoise,
    No. I already hear enough 'room tone' as it is. Adding more effects onto it won't do it. I'm looking for a dry mix off the board.

    Maybe setup sheets of heavy fabric off cam to help absorb some of the bounce. Maybe using radio mikes and thier quality helps also.

    In older days recording orchestras the audio used satellite dish mikes ( not sure of the offical name now or if they are still used) but they could stand 100ft back and still get a clean sound. That may be all obsolete now, bit it's always in the back of my head. I mean, if that's what it takes...

    Additionaly, in a band playing bars live, we used wireless mikes for the lead singer which ran around $3K and even then he had to have a mike in his face. Not sure about the wireless clipon settups. But maybe it's getting expensive.

    I wasn't the sound guy, that was just from observation.

    So, repeating myself I guess "Maybe setup sheets of heavy fabric off cam to help absorb some of the bounce. " may help with lo-to-no budget shoots.

    I played in an auditorium once that had the same problem. They eventually installed fabrics hanging from the ceiling to cut down on bounce. Also in small lo-end recording studios they often line the ceilings with egg crates. Also some absorbing objects are needed in the corners to cut down on bass bouncing around. Little things like that may help, apart from the miking issues themselves.

    -Yikes, lol. I'm not an expert though, I was just asking.
    Last edited by Gord.T; 11-17-2009 at 04:49 PM.
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    #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raptor365 View Post
    In reference to my earlier post about too much room tone in dialog...



    No. I already hear enough 'room tone' as it is. Adding more effects onto it won't do it. I'm looking for a dry mix off the board.

    Maybe setup sheets of heavy fabric off cam to help absorb some of the bounce. Maybe using radio mikes and thier quality helps also.

    In older days recording orchestras the audio used satellite dish mikes ( not sure of the offical name now or if they are still used) but they could stand 100ft back and still get a clean sound. That may be all obsolete now, bit it's always in the back of my head. I mean, if that's what it takes...

    Additionaly, in a band playing bars live, we used wireless mikes for the lead singer which ran around $3K and even then he had to have a mike in his face. Not sure about the wireless clipon settups. But maybe it's getting expensive.

    I wan't the sound guy, that was just from observation.

    So, repeating myself I guess "Maybe setup sheets of heavy fabric off cam to help absorb some of the bounce. " may help with lo-to-no budget shoots.

    I played in an auditorium once that had the same problem. They eventually installed fabics hanging from the ceiling to cut down on bounce. Also in small lo-end recording studios they often line the ceilings with egg crates. Also some absorbing objects are needed in the corners to cut down on bass bouncing around. Little things like that may help, apart from the miking issues themselves.

    -Yikes, lol. I'm not an expert though, I was just asking.
    ah ok, I misunderstood a few things I guess.
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    #27
    Still "Senior Member" Gord.T's Avatar
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    May be my fault then. I just meant the roominess of the characters conversations themselves, not the background ambience that everyone else has been focusing on in this thread (as I've read it).

    Ambience is a concern but is secondary to the initial dialog quality imo. You'de have to admit, without the latter, the ambience doesn't add much weight at that point to the dialog, if it's already crap.

    It's an interesting subject. I know people know how it's done. We hear it everyday on T.V and in all films ofcourse and have come to expect that quality in dialog.

    The more tips the better. I'd be interested in hearing as well.
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    #28
    Senior Member Brad S.'s Avatar
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    Well the first step is to get the mic as close as possible. I think ideally you'd want to get the mic about 2 feet away, but others that do production sound would be better able to answer that. Gohanto, who responded to this thread earlier, gives you the answer in his signature.

    As far as I know, there are no fool proof ways get rid of roomy dialog. There are things you can do to lessen the roominess, such as expanders, EQ, and some multi-band expanders, but they only lessen the problem and too much will get obvious rather quickly.
    Brad Semenoff
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    #29
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    I don't know of any way either to make dialog less roomy. It just can't be done. ADR is the only way to go if it's too roomy. And then you may have to deal with actors with very little experience getting their lines synced right while doing a good performance, and you spend up editing the lines for hours and being dissatisfied...

    Otherwise, I'll say that shotgun mics aren't called shotgun mics for no reason. They have to be POINTED AT the actor

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    #30
    Still "Senior Member" Gord.T's Avatar
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    Shotgun mikes would be something to look at then. And I still say the more you can deaden the sound/set physically before hand the better off you'll be. ADR is the ideal solution audibly but like Herman said it's not practical.
    Mmmm. Shotgun mikes and a dead room may be worth a look then.

    //Get those blankets out.
    Last edited by Gord.T; 11-17-2009 at 06:09 PM.
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