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    Are folks using UV filters?
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    Are you guys using UV filters on your lenses as a "protective measure"? Coming from a video background, I'm a bit new to the photography side of things. A friend told me that I should get one since it protects your lens, but I'm not very happy with the results of the 62mm ProMaster UV filter I purchased.

    Do most of you just run with straight glass? It seems from looking online that there are definitely two schools of thought. Before I got the filter I'd just keep the lens cap in my other hand and put it back on as soon as I was done recording a shot.


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    Senior Member Martti Ekstrand's Avatar
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    I use Kenko Pro1 Digital Protector which is a clear glass that do basically nothing but physical protection of the front element which otherwise would be full of my thumbprints.


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    Senior Member Ben_B's Avatar
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    Have a clear element on the front of one of my lenses that came with it...really like having that. Not using anything for kit and other lens...but they're doing ok...I carry a cleaning cloth with me and am usually somewhat compulsive with it.


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    I have a Hoya Super HMC UV(0) filter on all of my lenses. I see no ill effects. Actually I didn't notice any change to the image.



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    UV are a cheap way to protect your lens. But when filming you easily get reflections from the UV and in many situations it's best to remove the UV and shoot without.


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    Senior Member j's Avatar
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    I never use clear or UV filters, I just take caution not to scratch or smudge a lens.

    If you look at a film shoot, they *never* put superfluous glass in front of the lens. The only time is if they expect trouble: car shots, rain, mud, etc. And their lenses often cost more than a full Red setup.

    The mindset to put on a protective filter comes from the video production side of things where it is recommended to do so mostly because of the skill level of most consumers.

    You can do so if it makes you feel more secure, or just take caution.

    My .02


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    That's what I was thinking. I never had any problems with earlier video cameras, so I guess I shouldn't be worrying too much. I guess I also don't see the point of a protective filter if you have to take it off before shooting- wouldn't a lens cap do the same thing?

    I might look into some of the higher end Hoyas if you guys have had good luck and no ill effects.


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    Senior Member Martti Ekstrand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by j View Post
    If you look at a film shoot, they *never* put superfluous glass in front of the lens.
    Yes but if you look at a cinema lens it's very differently constructed, often has a bit of tube on the front end so the glass isn't directly within reach, has a lens cap that really stay on until intentionally removed, comes in very sturdy padded boxes, sits behind a matte box and generally have one person with the very specific job description of taking care of it like a newborn baby. It's a very different situation than ones most people here are using their GH1s.

    The mindset to put on a protective filter comes from the video production side of things where it is recommended to do so mostly because of the skill level of most consumers.
    Actually pro still photographers, especially out in the field have been using UV filters as a protective measure for half a century which I believe predates video production by a long run.


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    Senior Member j's Avatar
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    > job description of taking care of it like a newborn baby.
    > It's a very different situation than ones most people here are using their GH1s.

    Exactly. We do not disagree.

    :-)


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    Quote Originally Posted by onesock View Post
    I might look into some of the higher end Hoyas if you guys have had good luck and no ill effects.
    Hoya is fine, it is only the really low quality UV filters that will result in quality loss or reflections. Hoya is however not high end, but more the middle ground. High end filters made by B+W and Heliopan are among the best.

    Quote Originally Posted by Martti Ekstrand View Post
    Actually pro still photographers, especially out in the field have been using UV filters as a protective measure for half a century which I believe predates video production by a long run.
    Do remember that half a century ago, UV filters were more important as they also had the benefit of cutting away quite some haze and filter out UV light, which is less of a problem with digital.


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