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    Best Storyboarding Software?? Storyboard advice?
    #1
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    Hey All
    Im directing my first legitimate short film next month, that is with a budget and a big crew, etc...
    and I don't know how to draw.
    I'm trying to be as perfectionistic as possible with this baby so i figured some storyboards to go along with my shotlist would be a good thing to give the DP.
    ive seen all kinds of suggestions for storyboard software.
    are there any great free ones that people can recommend???

    thanks


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    I guess it depends on what your locations are and how much access you have or can get to them before you do your planning, but things that have worked for me:

    1. Find an artist, or beg an artistic friend, and work with them on doing up some sketches. You can help the artist, if they don't have any storyboard experience, by picking up a book on storyboarding, which you can share with them. I uses one once that also gave you blank storyboard sheets that you could photocopy and give to your artist.

    2. Use a still camera, with friends as stand-ins. Feed your friends for the help.

    3. Use Google Sketchup. The learning curve for what you'd need to do isn't too steep, although I went into it with some (limited) CAD experience. It's free.

    Also, the first thing a storyboarding book or guide will tell you is that you don't need to know how to draw. You can teach yourself the basics and get away with serviceable panels with the right instructions. But it's all a matter of preference. See what you're most comfortable with. Sketchup is nice because you can sort of navigate around your set, once you re-create it, by moving the "camera."

    I've found that drawing up diagrams for camera movement and light placement, after the storyboards are complete, really help too. You may be planning on doing that already but I just figured I'd mention because it can really keep a production grounded to have several complementary blueprints available once the furor starts.

    Good move getting started early on this, though. That's a good sign for a first production, as obvious a move as it may seem to you. I'm with you on the perfectionist wagon. Probably a crowded wagon.


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    #3
    Artful Dodger Sad Max's Avatar
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    Seconding the Sketchup recommendation. It's free, it's easy to use, and it comes with storyboarding templates.
    .
    The key to success is being too dumb to know when to quit.


    Motion Picture & Television Art Directors' Guild :: IATSE Local 800 :: Academy of Television Arts & Sciences

    ADG Award for Excellence in Production Design, Star Trek: Into Darkness (nominated, 2013)
    ADG Award for Excellence in Production Design, Mockingbird Lane (nominated, 2012)
    ADG Award for Excellence in Production Design, Avatar (2010)



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    #4
    Senior Member j's Avatar
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    sketchup, although I wish there were poseable/more people models.


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    #5
    Senior Member clang's Avatar
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    You can storyboard perfectly well with stick figures, unless you're shooting some wildly complicated multi-million dollar epic. What matters is whether people looking at the boards can tell which character is which and what they're doing.

    If your storyboards are just for the DP, then there's little point spending hundreds of hours doing artistic boards - talk to your DP and find out what kind of detail they actually want to see.


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    #6
    Artful Dodger Sad Max's Avatar
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    If'n you want sketchup goodies, check out Formfonts on line. They have a huge library of downloadable content.
    .
    The key to success is being too dumb to know when to quit.


    Motion Picture & Television Art Directors' Guild :: IATSE Local 800 :: Academy of Television Arts & Sciences

    ADG Award for Excellence in Production Design, Star Trek: Into Darkness (nominated, 2013)
    ADG Award for Excellence in Production Design, Mockingbird Lane (nominated, 2012)
    ADG Award for Excellence in Production Design, Avatar (2010)



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    #7
    Senior Member Austinv's Avatar
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    use your hand and a pencil
    Austin V
    www.youtube.com/boringpeopleent
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    DVX100B, Letus Extreme, Cinevate Rails, iKAN monitor, Redrock Follow Focus, Nikon 50mm 1.4, 24mm 2.8, 85mm 2.0, Bogen 503 head with 3246 sticks, Rode NTG2 Mic, Boom Pole, Century Optics fisheye, Kata CRC-14 Raincover



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    #8
    Artful Dodger Sad Max's Avatar
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    Tools like sketchup render accurate views based upon focal lengths, very useful in working out setups.

    You're not going to do that by hand without recourse to charts, projecting, and extensive practice.
    .
    The key to success is being too dumb to know when to quit.


    Motion Picture & Television Art Directors' Guild :: IATSE Local 800 :: Academy of Television Arts & Sciences

    ADG Award for Excellence in Production Design, Star Trek: Into Darkness (nominated, 2013)
    ADG Award for Excellence in Production Design, Mockingbird Lane (nominated, 2012)
    ADG Award for Excellence in Production Design, Avatar (2010)



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    #9
    Senior Member j's Avatar
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    > You can storyboard perfectly well with stick figures,

    NG. Especially when you use storyboards to "sell" a project to a client.

    > If'n you want sketchup goodies, check out Formfonts on line.

    Nice, thanks for that.

    > use your hand and a pencil

    Not my hand. For me and my crew, OK. For client approval - HA!


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    #10
    Mod v2.0 Noel Evans's Avatar
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    Nothing wrong with a bit of stick figure action :P

    Heres two examples of mine from last MV I shot - paid - this is what the client saw.



    w: Noel Evans TV

    e: noel@noelevans.tv
    p: +61 (0) 408 455 374


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