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    #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randall_Oelerich View Post
    I do not think I should mention the consultant, but I contacted a professional script consultant about her fees. She wrote back that yes she does consulting-- and what she does is have the writer write a one page summary of the story, then send that with a $1000 check to her. She replies with some feedback on the one page story summary. Is it just me or does that seem a bit over priced for what one gets? I was expecting quite a bit more for the money. Granted this consultant is a book author, but I have seen prices for Michael Hauge and John Rainey and they seem to offer so much more for the money.
    randall
    Depends who it is, what thier credentials are and past success, it's like the advertising business, your buying people, some are really good and some are thiefs.


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    #12
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    I ment her personal screen writing success, something that can be seen on IMDB for her own writing.


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    #13
    Senior Member 10s's Avatar
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    The one page synopsis thing simply stinks IMO but there are legit people out there that are helpful and worth the bucks.

    One thing to remember: Some of these script doctors consult on Hollywood properties and those screenplays are blueprints for 80 million dollar +/- features, so the script better be more than good because there's a lot riding on it. It might be cheap insurance so one can figure out to either abandon or spruce up a potential project if you're just not sure about it. But then again, nobody knows nothing in Hollywood. You live & die according to how well you do at the box. Getting the story right is one piece of the puzzle.

    For many of us the cost is simply crazy, for an 80 million dollar feature it's peanuts.


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    #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Paige View Post
    Of course, that's not foolproof, either. There are many people who are working screenwriters who have never been produced. There are successful screenwriters who write on projects that never get produced. There are successful screenwriters who wrote on films you'd have heard of but who didn't get credit.
    My point was if you have some titles it's not hard to do a little research to find these answers out. If there is any decent success with the person it's not hard to varify it in this industry, everyone knows everyone (atleast on the level I'm talking about and if she is on that level no prob). And no, your name dosen't have to be on IMDB I just used that as a place to start somewhere for a little background research, you'll be able to tell in two seconds if they were turds and never produced and if they were produced how bad they were etc.. I have declined all my IMDB credits (or asked to be credited under a name from a 70's T.V series ) and will continue to at this stage but if I gave you some projects I have worked on they could easlily be varified.

    Back to what I ment, do your homework, you'll get to the facts about the persons success or lack of pretty quick.


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    #15
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    Wow! You know how I said in some other thread that I didn't read people's stuff for money? I take that back. Send me $999 and the synopsis and I'll write at least 1 page of feedback... from some tropical beach while sipping umbrella drinks.

    - bill


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    #16
    Senior Member Zephyrnoid's Avatar
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    I may be a bit out of my element here but if you'll bear with me, I'd like to overlay my consulting expertise with my artistic experience. $1000 is peanuts for any subject matter expert to give a quick 15 minute response on a well crafted summary. In truth, if you can't craft a watertight summary in 500 words or so, that expert's feed back will save you more than $1000 in time wasted searching for feedback.
    I do not charge $1000 for 15 minutes of my time BUT I have made as much as that in 15 minutes of laser-beam focused analysis. I mean, I can write a one page assessment of a one page summary that IS worth $1000 and some of my clients do gladly pay it. Then again, it all depends on the potential value of the project and the domain. Is it likely to be a hit movie or just a so-so concept? If so, then $1000 is peanuts. And only a reputed expert can make that determination. Not friends and family.
    Agents, Script Consultants indeed all high end consultants make their 'nut' exclusively on track record. And man is handicapping talent a high profit business in America. Right?


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    #17
    Senior Member pmark23's Avatar
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    I'm also not a believer in script consultants. I've read several dozen scripts for friends/acquaintances and from script-sharing boards, and one thing I found is that it's incredibly easy to read someone else's script and give a good and honest critique.

    The problem that writers have is that it's very hard to critique your own work. But as soon as someone give a bit of advice ("I didn't understand the character's motivation here.") it clicks and you immediately see the problem.

    It doesn't take a "script doctor" to give very good pointers on your script, just someone knowledgeable about screenplay writing and who has a good grounding in dramatic structure -- which should be just about anyone who's serious about writing (and not just screenplays).

    I think when a writer becomes more proficient they become better and better at judging their own work and the need for script-doctoring becomes less and less.

    But I can see the appeal for beginning writers -- especially those who don't have a network of fellow screenwriters and especially those who are at a level above them.


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    #18
    Senior Member Nektonic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zephyrnoid View Post
    I do not charge $1000 for 15 minutes of my time BUT I have made as much as that in 15 minutes of laser-beam focused analysis. I mean, I can write a one page assessment of a one page summary that IS worth $1000 and some of my clients do gladly pay it. Then again, it all depends on the potential value of the project and the domain. Is it likely to be a hit movie or just a so-so concept? If so, then $1000 is peanuts. And only a reputed expert can make that determination. Not friends and family.
    Agents, Script Consultants indeed all high end consultants make their 'nut' exclusively on track record. And man is handicapping talent a high profit business in America. Right?
    I would like to say that depending on who is writing the script, a consultant may or may not be a worthwhile or justifiable expense. The established and working screenwriter who makes a couple hundred thousand to near a million on a script sale or assignment, might easily be able to afford the top of the line experts. Or a studio story development executive or an established producer might easily be able to throw tens of thousands at a good story consultant. While some aspiring scribe who makes 30,000 bucks a year and lives in the middle of nowhere whilst having no exploitable connections to the industry might not be able to justify that kind of dough on a screenplay analysis, let alone one for a single page synopsis.

    What about someone like Robert Rodriguez? When he made El Mariachi for 7 grand, he would be blowing a substantial amount of his tiny budget by hiring a thousand dollar a pop story or script consultant.

    I think the reason why we are debating whether or not one thousand dollars is worth it for a one page synopsis analysis is that there are many story and script analysis services that come recommended by those in the know, and at a much more affordable rate. It is everyone's right to charge what they deem fit, but is it smart to charge as much as you can? I do wedding videography. I'd love to charge two to three times what I do now, and I think my work is actually worth a lot more than I do charge. Somewhere you have to just bite the bullet and charge a competitive rate. I don't know enough about the story and script consultation profession to know exactly what an acceptable rate is. I think the real issue is that those who price themselves out of the market end up losing a lot in the end.


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    #19
    Senior Member Eximious's Avatar
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    As has been said already, I don't think this service is catered towards our market. It sounds much less like a script analysis than an idea analysis. After all, one page isn't even a treatment for a feature-length. It's barely enough to convey the concept, the main character attributes, and some of the major dramatic beats / conflicts. So, I'm guessing established writers might use this service before going all-out into a scene outline. After all, if you're a marquee writer, why waste your valuable time on a mediocre concept?

    That said, if this writer were passing this service off as a full script consultation, that'd be unacceptable. Sure, you can tell a lot about a writer in only one condensed page. But that information is usually most telling if the writer is terrible. I'm sure there are plenty of us here who could write a solid 1-page idea pitch. But we're all still struggling to make it big. High concepts are great, but that's not even half the battle of a good story. Where's the electricity between your romantic leads? The suspense when we see the gun under the table? How do the beats play out? Can you write cogently over 120 pages? There's a reason a good feature screenplay takes ~120 pages. If it took more, it'd be an epic. Less, a novella.

    But hell Randall, I'm finished with prep and halfway into Act I of a feature-length myself. I'd be willing to read yours if you'd be willing to read mine when I finish later this summer. I can't promise to know your genre real well, but I can tell you that I try to give some of the fairest feedback in my writing workshops.


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    #20
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    This is a joke right ? How long it could take to read one page and write opinion ,like an hour at max? Ok half to be honest . Whats the regular wage for one hour of job in states ? Double it and give it to her.
    ITs not like good films are always succesfull and are blockbusters anyway, a lot of blockbusters are sh**ty films,but thats the buisness,they were ca$h takers cause they were advertised in tv and papers.Better save the money for some advertising of the film,i couldnt believe when i read that Jurassic Park was made for 90 million$ and advertising of this film took 60 million$ ,


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