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    What's the difference between an Executive & Associate Producer?
    #1
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    tell me if i'm correct on this: if you know a sales guy (that knows nothing about filmmaking) that is pretty tight with a wealthy person and then introduces you to this wealthy person to make a film...in terms of credits, would the sales guy be the associate producer and the wealthy person be the executive producer when discussing producer credits?

    how is the associate producer paid his finders fee? i've read it's normally 3-5% of the funding he secures, but would it be up front as soon as the production money is locked in place or would it be paid out of profits?

    i've been reading a lot of information on producing and there seems to be a thin line between the associate producer and an executive producer on an independent film.


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    Chapelgrove Films
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    You have it right. The sales guy is the associate producer, the rich guy is the executive producer.

    As for how he is paid, it depends on what the two of you agree to. Either you pay him up-front when the money is secured, or you have a deferred-pay arrangement. Personally, I'd pay him up-front, regardless of how I'm paying anyone else. A good associate producer -- someone who is adept at finding the money people for you -- is worth his weight in gold.


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    Mr. Hollywood Blaine's Avatar
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_producer

    Definitions

    Producer: the individual who has the greatest involvement and oversight among a film's various producers. In smaller companies or independent projects, may be the equivalent of the executive producer.

    Executive producer: In major productions, usually a representative or CEO of the film studio - although the title may be given as an honorarium to a major investor - often oversees the financial, administrative and creative aspects of production, though not technical aspects. In smaller companies or independent projects, may be synonymous with creator/writer.

    Co-producer: A producer who reports to the Executive Producer and provides money to finance a project. In large productions, the co-producer is more involved in the day-to-day production. In independent projects, the title can connote an involvement in the inception of the production.

    Associate producer: Usually acts as a representative of the Producer, who may share financial, creative, or administrative responsibilities, delegated from that producer. Often, a title for an experienced film professional acting as a consultant or a title granted as a courtesy to one who makes a major financial or creative contribution to the production.

    Assistant producer: Usually works under the direction of the Associate Producer.
    Production director: A representative of the film company assigned to the set and
    given the authority to act on behalf of the senior production-team members.

    Line Producer: Oversees a film's budget and day-to-day activities

    Production supervisor : Usually performs managerial duties on one aspect of the production.

    Production manager: Manages the studio.

    Post production supervisor: Usually performs the post team in movies.

    Production designer: Usually oversees the on screen visual aspects of a location or set - including stage dressing, props, color palette, and set design.

    Administrative Producer: Reports to the Board of Directors. Freelancers are employed by the Administrative Producer for specific tasks such as press and publicity activities, design, production management, etc.


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    thanks blaine

    Quote Originally Posted by chapelgrovefilms View Post
    You have it right. The sales guy is the associate producer, the rich guy is the executive producer.

    As for how he is paid, it depends on what the two of you agree to. Either you pay him up-front when the money is secured, or you have a deferred-pay arrangement. Personally, I'd pay him up-front, regardless of how I'm paying anyone else. A good associate producer -- someone who is adept at finding the money people for you -- is worth his weight in gold.
    yea i was thinking that's what made the most sense (paying him up front) since there wouldn't be a film without having his contacts. cool, i just didn't know if there was a typical way of doing things.


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    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    A lot of this varies from medium to medium. In low budget TV and DVD bonus world, the executive producer is the person who signs my checks and the associate producer is the one on the phone booking talent for interviews, dealing with the studio, handling logistics of my travel and shoots. They are the "stay in the office and be the communications conduit" but of course this varies, depending on the medium.

    Dan
    Yeah, just like you, I bought a Canon C100.


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    Along these lines I am wondering about two titles in my documentary that I am "Producing" It is about POW and MIA Veterans.

    I am the guy who is shooting the footage, funding the works, directing the editing, the concept, doing the interviews, directing the makeup, setting up the sound...So rather than title myself DICTATOR in the film, how should I list myself?

    Now my son is doing the actual at the computer editing with me. He is involved in some concept, assisting on location shoots, and will entirely score the film. What is the best way to list him? We have a dedicated website to the film but I don't know if it is proper to put that out here on the rules of the forum. BTW, #1 son is also a web designer and did the website as well.


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    You sound like the producer/director where your son would be am associate producer /editor?

    Michael


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    #8
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    Thanks Michael. that makes total sense. Appreciate it.


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    I've even seen where the Executive Producer was simply the guy who ponied up the cash for the movie but had no say-so or anything else to do with the movie. One of the "Associate Producers" simply was the Producer's girl friend. "Associate Producer" credit can be handed out to just about anybody!!!


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    Interestingly, when you copyright a movie, the U.S. Copyright Office doesn't want to see the Executive Producer listed as a holder of the copyright. They only accept creative positions as the copyright holder. I mention this because I once had to change our Executive Producer's title on the copyright paperwork to Co-Producer for them to accept it.


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