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    A request for actors
    #1
    Chapelgrove Films
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    I like actors. One of the most fun parts of pre-pro for me is casting. I love getting headshots and resumes, and holding auditions.

    These days, most of the headshots and resumes I get come via email. And that's where I have one small request for actors.

    Please please PLEASE make SURE the headshot you attach to your email is sized small enough that it can be seen in its entirety on a single screen. I can't tell you how many headshots I've received that, when opened, were so HUGE that I found myself looking at part of an eyebrow. Not only does it make for a large email size, but it makes it very difficult and annoying to try and view the headshot.

    So PLEASE be aware of the screen size of your headshots. If you don't know how to adjust their size, find someone who does. Those of us who are producers and directors will be forever grateful.

    .
    David W. Richardson
    Writer/Producer/Director/Editor
    Chapel Grove Films
    Celtic Cross Films
    Bliss Video Productions
    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1400903/?ref_=tt_ov_dr


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    #2
    Bronze Member GageFX's Avatar
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    Very interesting. I prefer larger photos so I can print them out.


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    #3
    Chapelgrove Films
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    I don't have any problem printing out a screen-sized photo. But when I get a photo where the entire screen is filled with the actor's nose or eyeball, that's just TOO big.

    .
    David W. Richardson
    Writer/Producer/Director/Editor
    Chapel Grove Films
    Celtic Cross Films
    Bliss Video Productions
    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1400903/?ref_=tt_ov_dr


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    #4
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    You should try using a different email client. gmail sizes all images properly.


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    #5
    Senior Member Cryogenic Filmworks's Avatar
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    I just save them to a folder on my computer. Then when I browse the folder and click on a photo, it opens in windows picture and fax viewer. This then shows the full picture on screen and I still have the full resolution photo for printing.
    When you have to shoot, shoot, don't talk. (Tuco-The Good, the Bad and the Ugly)

    IMDb Green Eyed Monster // Waiting 2 Die:A Veteran Affair // Bail Out

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    #6
    Bronze Member GageFX's Avatar
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    +1

    Except I use ACDSee to browse.


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    #7
    Junior Member alankley's Avatar
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    In general, I try to teach my family and friends to be aware of photo size and when emailing, to downsize them to make it more convenient for viewing and storing. But in your business David, there are many variables that may not make this good advice. Does the receiver ever plan to print the photo? Then you really want a hi-res photo. What resolution is the monitor where it will be viewed? They can vary quite a bit (1024x768, 1600x1200). Do you have a dual-monitor setup? Is your monitor landscape or portrait (I have 2 monitors one is portrait the other is landscape). Again, the sender does not know.

    As was suggested, it may be best to receive hi-res photos and store them locally on your hard drive. This gives you, the viewer, the flexibility to view them in the size you choose (you simply have to be familiar with the tools installed on your computer or the features of your OS). With software or OS integration commands, you can always resize them down if you wish. If you don't want to spend the time manipulating photos you receive, or figuring out what tool to use to automatically resize the photos for viewing, in your instructions on submitting, specify the size you want for the head shots.


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    #8
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    a
    Last edited by Prodigi Pictures; 05-27-2009 at 06:45 PM.


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    #9
    Chapelgrove Films
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    Generally, I don't print headshots and resumes of every person who submits. I store them on the PC and refer to them as needed.

    I do file a hard copy of the headshots and resumes of people I cast, but usually request these from the actors themselves, and they bring them to the shoot.

    I don't have printer ink, paper or file cabinet space to store hard copies of every headshot/resume I receive. That's why I do it this way.
    David W. Richardson
    Writer/Producer/Director/Editor
    Chapel Grove Films
    Celtic Cross Films
    Bliss Video Productions
    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1400903/?ref_=tt_ov_dr


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    #10
    Actor!!!!!! Tom Marshall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chapelgrovefilms View Post
    Generally, I don't print headshots and resumes of every person who submits. I store them on the PC and refer to them as needed.

    I do file a hard copy of the headshots and resumes of people I cast, but usually request these from the actors themselves, and they bring them to the shoot.

    I don't have printer ink, paper or file cabinet space to store hard copies of every headshot/resume I receive. That's why I do it this way.
    Not to mention the extra expense of ink cartridges (or color toner) and good paper to print the headshots on. It's also much much easier to flip through a digital "photo book" than flip through a stack of headshots.

    If you really want to get fancy, you can set up some sort of database (using Access or whatever) and categorize all the headshots you have according to hair color, eye color, special skills, or whatever.
    Actor / Musician


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