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    #11
    Senior Member Cryogenic Filmworks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Farnsworth View Post
    But according to the law firm I quoted above, you cannot bring a law suit against this other party until your script has been registered with the copyright office. And if you register with the copyright office AFTER the infringement has taken place, you are not entitled to recover attorney fees or statutory damages.
    You can sue for anything (and in this day and age lots of people sue for all kinds of crap). If you are registered with the WGA, they will (from the information I have read off their site) will assist you with the lawsuit. You cannot collect money damages however (for the most part). If you are registered with the copyright office, you are eligible for money damages. WGA protects you and you can sue, but copyright office allows you to collect money on that lawsuit. (that's the way I understand it at least).
    When you have to shoot, shoot, don't talk. (Tuco-The Good, the Bad and the Ugly)

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    #12
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    Interesting. So if not cash, what can you sue for? To block the film's release? Most shorts never see any kind of official release. I guess you could prevent it being shown at festivals and so forth, but is the legal and financial hassle worth it?

    Or maybe screen credit? Again, is the hassle of the law suit worth it?

    I'm still not seeing how WGA registering a short script benefits me. Copyright, yes. WGA, not yet.


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    #13
    Senior Member strangways's Avatar
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    As I understand it, for union films, the WGA often helps determine who gets credited (and how) for writing the film.

    For example, if writers collaborate, or one works to revise the work of another, they get their names listed with either "&" or "and" to denote this difference. I just can't remember which is which.

    Also, to be credited for a revision, the WGA will look at it, compare it to the previous version, and determine how much was altered. We're not talking typos here, but actual story changes.

    So, in those situations, WGA registration is useful. For an independent film? Maybe not so much.

    Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong on any of the above.


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    #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by strangways View Post
    As I understand it, for union films, the WGA often helps determine who gets credited (and how) for writing the film.
    I believe those rules apply only to films being written under a WGA contract, which is a completely separate thing from films *registered* with the WGA.


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    #15
    Senior Member Tim Joy's Avatar
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    I've been thinking about this whole copyright/ registration thing and I don't see much of a point, at least at the level I'm working at, which may be the same level a lot of people are at here.

    If someone steals MY script and makes a little short film out of it, to me, that's GREAT. It means they thought it was good enough to shoot with, and I would want to see how they made it. I'm sure they'd do it all wrong, but wouldn't it be interesting to see?

    If I still want to shoot it after that, then I will. Who cares? I'll have a different movie, and probably better than the "theives' " because I'll get to see the weak parts of the script and can fix it.

    Now if the evil stealers copyrighted "MY" script and barred me from using it, now that.... that would be... like.. very uncool, and I might have to pay them a visit with my tire iron and my friend named Bubba.


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    #16
    Senior Member Mike Manning's Avatar
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    WGA registration is worthless without having copyrighted your script. The first thing a judge will ask in court is "Who owns the US Code - Title 17 Copyrights to said document." If you do not own the copyright, you LOSE! If you feel the need to register it with WGA, it can't hurt... especially if they'll send someone to testify. But you can't solely rely on it.


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    #17
    Senior Member alex whitmer's Avatar
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    The 'politically correct' term used by idea thieves is 'mining'. When they see a script they like, or one with nuggets of marketable concepts, they mine it, and leave the slag for the orginal writer/s.

    This way they get the best parts of the concept with out actually copying it or 'stealing' it, and the original script is rendered useless. To sue is difficult at best, and for the little guys, a joke. And theives know it.

    Festivals are rife with these same 'miners', sent out to harvest ideas and get them back to the office asap and lock them up.

    People do this to each other? Absolutely, and remorse has no place in film.

    Registering is no guarantee.

    a


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    #18
    Junior Member tykrusch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Isaac_Brody View Post
    WGA register your scripts. It doesn't cost much and it's a good habit to get into. Especially when sending your scripts into the "ether" of the internet. I eat ether for breakfast.

    Writers Guild of America West
    http://www.wgawregistry.org/webrss/
    Cost: $20

    Writers Guild of America East
    https://www.wgaeast.org/script_reg/
    Cost: $22
    Is this process any different for Canadians?


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    #19
    Member LadyNatasha87's Avatar
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    I am from the UK where should I register my scripts?


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    #20
    Senior Member StormFactory's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by strangways View Post
    For example, if writers collaborate, or one works to revise the work of another, they get their names listed with either "&" or "and" to denote this difference. I just can't remember which is which.
    & = you writer as a team

    and = you are not a team and one of you rewrote the other


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    Strangways & StormFactory

    Means that we wrote the script together.


    DVXUser Post
    written by
    Strangways and StormFactory

    Means that I rewrote you.
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