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    #11
    Still "Senior Member" Gord.T's Avatar
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    2. The client who can't make deadlines:
    This client wants you to set his project at top priority because he’s on a tight schedule and needs to get something produced right away. You agree, assuming that you’ll have all of the information you need to get it done quickly. Unfortunately, your client drops off the face of the earth, ignoring your requests for approvals and other correspondence until your previously agreed upon due date comes around. At this point, you’re both blaming each other as the reason that the project’s not done, and it’s not pretty.
    Yep.
    //edit: Fired him.
    Last edited by Gord.T; 10-10-2009 at 02:42 AM.
    "Remember To Dip the Right End of the Cigar in your $250.00 dollar glass of Brandy." -Doc Bernard.


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    #12
    Senior Member bill totolo's Avatar
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    Definitely worth while to do some spring cleaning once in a while ; )
    Bill Totolo
    L.A.

    www.billtotolo.com


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    #13
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    I feel really bad for my designer because he gets phone calls which start with random stuff like: "Change the banner...you know the banner" ...and I do mean that is the very begining of the phone conversation.
    ______________
    Assurance retraite vie complementaire fr | Vie assurance retraite complementaire fr


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    #14
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    The cheap clients are often more work than the expensive ones. Less pay and more headaches. The problem is that they don't take your job seriously.

    Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.
    - Theodore Roosevelt

    Justin McAleece
    http://www.redonerental.net
    Justin@BLAREMedia.net


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    Yup
    #15
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    We have a client like this, and it's not even video production / editing anymore. It started with that, and we did a big project for them, now I contract out design / Website maintenance / hosting for them, as my company is a media company so I try to offer it all.

    We gave them a great rate on our maintenance contract and the work we've done, but (this was a problem during the video work too) they are very hard to communicate with and just do not express what they want. About 29 days ago now we got an e-mail "Can you fix the management page there is stuff wrong with it," and that was really the extent of the e-mail. We sent back asking specifically what is requested, what text needs changing, and to what, etc. Nothing. Haven't heard back.

    This happened so often that they started yelling at us for not meeting deadlines or offering timely service. So finally we implemented a trouble ticket system, where they have to submit all changes via e-mail that logs them into a system, OTRS, and e-mails my friend and I immediately. From there, we e-mail them back when it's done or when more information is requested. This clearly shows the chain of communication so that when work isn't done because we're waiting on them, we can show them exactly why it wasn't done and that we last communicated to them with NO response. It has been great having the system in place and at least the client cannot reasonably complain any further without us being able to prove that we're waiting on them.

    It's convenient because it does pay to be right -- individual properties communicate with us, but we get in trouble with corporate if stuff isn't done. Corporate doesn't know where the ball was dropped, they just are hearing it wasn't done. So now we can show them and they can get on their own people about communication, rather than getting after us about it.

    With new clients I spell out clearly what the contract entails and what must be done, etc. No more nightmare clients, lol.


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    #16
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    Oh God, my buddy who I often work with on certain projects has client 1,2,3 and 6 all rolled into one. I think he'll be lucky to break even. I told him don't be so desperate for work. Ask for more. Don't take the first low-balled offer.

    Who the hell else is the client going to get to do the project that cheap? His 12 year old nephew with handycam?


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    Babies get it - why not freelancers?
    #17
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    Any parent who tells you the first words out of the mouth of their babes is Mama or Dada is shining you on.

    In 99.9 per cent of all cases, the first word is 'No!'

    It's the single most popular direction they get in the first few months of life so only makes sense that it's the first one - being dog simple to say - that they spit back.

    But for some unfathomable reason, your average freelancer just can't say it when it comes to crazy situations posed by crazy clients who are never going to see reason.

    No! is the freelancer's friend.

    Will you do this for free?

    No!

    Will you donate 27 extra hours to this project for no extra money?

    No!

    Will you kiss my crusty, skanky butt?

    No!

    Sure, somebody will say Yes! to all of the above. Just don't let it be you.

    Cheers,
    George


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    #18
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    I htink the porblem is they only see the "free" part of freelancer.


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    #19
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    this is why rap videos suck


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    #20
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    freelance [ˈfriːˌlɑːns]
    n
    1. (Communication Arts / Journalism & Publishing)
    a. Also called freelancer a self-employed person, esp a writer or artist, who is not employed continuously but hired to do specific assignments
    b. (as modifier) a freelance journalist
    2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person, esp a politician, who supports several causes or parties without total commitment to any one
    3. (Historical Terms) (in medieval Europe) a mercenary soldier or adventurer
    vb
    (Communication Arts / Journalism & Publishing) to work as a freelance on (an assignment, etc.)
    adv
    as a freelance
    [C19 (in sense 3): later applied to politicians, writers, etc.]

    Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 6th Edition 2003. William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd 1979, 1986 HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003

    I donl't see anything about working for next to nothing in that definition.

    From now on I am a Video Mercenary, or perhaps Media Mercenary. I like that better.


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