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Kevin Lee
05-15-2006, 12:49 PM
I tried so hard to get a crew together and film this short. Tried to keep them motivated as well. We worked pretty hard on everything, but to no avail. We cannot finish in time. So many disagreements between us all. There is a bit of relief, but a lot of depression to go with it. :(

I learned so much about what it takes to create a short film. Plus I made a nice skater dolly/jib arm that I am proud of, and everyone was impressed with. Made some takes that looked really sweet. So with that, all is not lost.

I am trying to figure out where I would fit in for our next project, cuz the DP I used has a sony fx1 and wants to use that from now on. Doesn't seem to like the DVX. My freind that wrote the screen play is very artistic and took over directing. Which Kind of leaves me with my thumb up my a** . Even though I came up with alot of the ideas for props and effects.

So umm yeah, I am a bit upset right now. I would still like to finish this project in a couple of months. I hope y'all would watch it then, and give me some pointers.

Brandon Rice
05-15-2006, 12:53 PM
Bummer dude... keep at it... you'll make something awesome! The process is so hard, yet so rewarding :)

Beat Takeshi
05-15-2006, 12:56 PM
Sorry to hear that. Too many cooks in the kitchen it sounds like. You have to stay focused and not take too many ideas or else you move no where.
Was this your first?

Kholi
05-15-2006, 12:58 PM
I told Briceman the same thing a while back--

I just had no idea how hard it is to make a good short. Let a lone a good feature.

There's a lot of hard work that goes into it.

Good luck on finishing. I'm in the SAME boat as you. Trying to contact everyone so that I can get it done next weekend, as I am so ready to get past this short and onto another.

Kevin Lee
05-15-2006, 01:28 PM
Thanks guys, yes Aram, its my first.

Beat Takeshi
05-15-2006, 01:47 PM
Rough start but keep on keeping on. It only gets better. I learned to make sure you have a back up plan before you need one.

snodart
05-15-2006, 02:03 PM
Kdawg. You said it. You are walking away with knowledge. This is my first true production as well. Wow, what work. I've come close to having to back out as well, so don't feel too bad.

Charli
05-15-2006, 02:41 PM
Movies is all about collaboration. The screenwriter writes the script; that script
is then rewritten by ten other screenwriters; then once a director is attached,
he/she will make changes; and if the actor has any clout, they'll add their two
cents. Collaboration.

If however, you are Executive Producer, you just have to toss your weight.
Take what you can, learn what you can, but don't be afraid to put your foot down.

Charli

Beat Takeshi
05-15-2006, 03:21 PM
On bigger films that is true. Small ones seem to suffer from too many ideas most of the time. What happens is that if you let too many people give too much input, you wind up having disagreements if someones idea gets shot down and then feelings get hurt and that should never happen. It should be fun on set most of the time and never any yelling or treating anyone like they dont mean anything to the production. That kills the moral every single time and who the hell wants to work like that. When it gets to the point where its fustrating then its time to step back and take a break to rethink the plan so it goes smoothly from then on and not try to force it so it sucks the rest of the time.

soffcore
05-15-2006, 04:09 PM
Because we are, essentially, amateur filmakers with little to no money to pay people, I find the best way to go about collaborating is to work with people you know and trust, and with roles already defined. If you're writing with someone, get on the same page before the director comes on board. Then get on the same page with him before casting actors. It is a tough process, but you can't go at it alone. You need like-minded people to go at it with you.

Daniel Skubal
05-17-2006, 08:47 AM
Because we are, essentially, amateur filmakers with little to no money to pay people, I find the best way to go about collaborating is to work with people you know and trust, and with roles already defined. If you're writing with someone, get on the same page before the director comes on board. Then get on the same page with him before casting actors. It is a tough process, but you can't go at it alone. You need like-minded people to go at it with you.

well said. You summed it up nicely.

I always try to do way more than I should, but the trick to all of this is getting everyone to show up. After that, it's easy peasy.

Beat Takeshi
05-17-2006, 08:54 AM
Yeah, thats how its been going. I have been building a small crew that I like and have fun with on projects that require them and will always ask them first to come on. I always feed my crew with a nice dinner or lunch out at a restaurant and let them order anything they want and I always try to have a cast and crew party.

soffcore
05-17-2006, 10:34 AM
Food is a great motivator. I think we spent more money on kraft services than just about anything else. And of course, a kick-ass wrap party doesn't hurt either!

Mike McNeese
05-17-2006, 12:13 PM
Food is a great motivator. I think we spent more money on kraft services than just about anything else. And of course, a kick-ass wrap party doesn't hurt either!

Much agreed. 70% of my budget was food. Gotta keep these people happy. Not just for this project, but for future ones as well.

And I can't say enough for finding people that are devoted to the project. Not only does it help in acquiring cast and crew, but locations, gear, etc. This is my first serious short film project, and I've learned a ton...most valuable lesson=production planning.

Beat Takeshi
05-18-2006, 02:17 PM
Two weeks ago I was stressing because I was broke to the yolk and couldnt really feed the actors and get through the next 2 weeks without any money. It turns out that they are on a health binge and only ate nuts and berries so they didnt want dinner. I was like Hurraay! But I did offer a million times to make sure. If we place high enough it would be cool to get everyone out to the screening in LA. That would be a nice gift.