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Gordon JL
03-14-2006, 10:03 PM
Should there be other requirements for entering a dvxfestival besides just having 1 post? What if a "pro" who has had a lot of experience decides to enter the contest; doesn't this give a disadvantage to the newbies? Think about it. For someone like me; who owns a DVX, a basic tripod, and a lighting kit I got from a hardware shop, to go up against someone who has connections, access to major equipment like a recording studio, dollies, professional lighting, cranes, decent actors, etc., and a lot of experience to boot, wouldn't really be fair. There are many things to consider, like the person's experience in the industry, the connections he or she has, access to equipment, or maybe even how much money that person is willing to spend. Now, someone like Spielberg probably wouldn't want to enter the contest, but still; there probably should be a bar set or some limitation made.

Maybe setting a cost limit on the film (budget per entry) would work; like say $150, which would discourage those who are especially wealthy and experienced from entering, but the "pros" would still find ways to spend their money better than the amateurs -- this may only hurt the people who are new to this. Another requirement which could be implemented is to restrict those who have played an important role in a "big" budget movie. But I really don't know. I'm just throwing ideas out there.

Kholi
03-14-2006, 10:36 PM
There were people that are considered "professionals" that entered the previous contests and still did not win.

No need to be afraid of being outdone. Just put your best foot forward, the product you create is your award regardless if you place or not in the contest.

Jared Meyer
03-14-2006, 11:25 PM
doesn't this give a disadvantage to the newbies?

Is there something wrong with this? Of course someone with less experience is at a "disadvantage" compared to someone with more experience. That's pretty self-evident.

That's the nature of a contest.

profnoxin
03-14-2006, 11:34 PM
Yeah, I would use this as a call to all newbies to pull your sh*t together, make connections with professionals, talk to people and learn. Hell, I'm a working D.P. and I didn't win a damn thing in Sci-Fest. It's all about what the audience likes, and who puts their heart into their project. Contect has no direct correlation with experience. Technique on the other hand... this is where talking to pros is going to help you out. There's nothing in the rules that says that just because you own the dvx and the lighting kit, that's where you need to stop. Set your bar higher, don't try to handicap others. It's the only way to grow and learn.

My two cents, for what it's worth.

Alex DePew
03-15-2006, 10:54 AM
I'm in your situation. I am brand new, just have the camera, tripod and a shotgun mic. But I'm still gonna put out a great film.

Tools do not a filmmaker make. Mmmm, yes.

http://grudge-match.com/Images/yoda.jpg

A filmmaker is good because of his talent and dedication. Experience and skill will always win out over toys and a big budget in my book. I am learning the ropes now and learning how important collaboration is. If you lack the tools, find others who have them. I'm just learning how great the indie film community can be. People love to work with someone with passion and vision. But before that, make sure you have a good script and know what you want.

Don't feel limited by your equipment. Filmmaking is about resourcefulness, adaptation and love of the craft.

Final Design Studios
03-15-2006, 12:06 PM
Dude, its a contest, its a competition. It's design to make the newbie a pro.

Mino
03-15-2006, 12:29 PM
Although I didn't get a chance to enter Sci-Fi fest I remember watching Similio and realizing that my odds of beating this film were slim to none based on my experience level. I am entering hero fest with the knowledge that a film or two of this caiber will also be in the running....I'm COUNTING on it! This fact doesn't bother me but instead sharpens my resolve to be at the top of my game throughout all phases of production in the making of my short. I for one am happy that people with more experienec and equiptment than I will be involved. It not only raises the bar, but will serve to bring out the best I can be with what I have In skill ang gear. If I should happen to win or place, I know it will make it that much sweeter to have had stiff competition...My .02

Norm Sanders
03-15-2006, 02:34 PM
Mino's got a very good point, that those with less experience, beating out those who are considered industry pros, or work for a living in the industry, should feel that much better about the end result.

Two other things ...

I personally LOVE having some of the extreme talent that's on here entering the fest, as it raises the bar & pushes me all that much harder.

Secondly, there will get to a point that the major pros, probably wouldn't want to enter, as let's face it ... the larger majority of people that enter this fest are either just starting out, or still trying to learn how to maximize their camera (I'm in this category) ... so it'd be like a college grad wanting to enter a contest with a bunch of junior high kids. Where's the challenge for them? There wouldn't be much of one, and that alone will usually keep the big wigs out ... they want a challenge, just like most of us do.

For you REAL talented folks out there, don't take the above as an insult, as if I just classified you with junior high kids ... but a large majority of people entering, I'm assuming, are new or still have a long way to go (in one aspect or another).

Kevin Lee
03-15-2006, 02:43 PM
Agreed here as well, I know this being my first shot at this, my film is going so suck ass. (BTW I dont even have a lighting kit) But It does give me a place to start. It will be work, but it will be fun at the same time.

Grant
03-15-2006, 02:55 PM
lighting smiting, we dont need no stinkin lighting...... now a camera on the other hand would be great!!!!!!!!

Aaron Marshall
03-15-2006, 04:48 PM
I'd rather have some wicked good pro directors in the fest than a bunch of kiddies with cameras. I agree with jaustere and toilet_bob. It's the spirit of competition. If you lowered everything around you to suit your needs the world would be a crappy place. Bring yourself up to a higher level. It won't happen overnight. If you have some great people around that you can learn from; I think that would be better than being surrounded by a bunch of novices patting each other on the back.

Norm Sanders
03-15-2006, 04:58 PM
lighting smiting, we dont need no stinkin lighting...... now a camera on the other hand would be great!!!!!!!!

Oooooh, lighting is SO important. In fact, each aspect of the film is SO important (i.e. camera, lighting, sound, talent, story, editing, etc.).

But, you don't need expensive lighting gear ... get creative with DIY stuff from Home Depot.

I was able to pull off a pretty impressive newscast in my first short, DEATH MARCH, with just $30 worth of lights from Home Depot, and about $10 in blue fabric from Wal-Mart ... in fact, that newscast was probably the highest production value for my short. :)

Grant
03-15-2006, 10:28 PM
Envision,
guess my scarcasm did not come through the message board..... i was obviously joking :)

Norm Sanders
03-15-2006, 10:39 PM
Oops. Just call me Mr. Literal.:nads:

Brandon Rice
03-15-2006, 10:42 PM
That should be your custom name... Mr Literal :)

Norm Sanders
03-15-2006, 10:46 PM
Thanks, Astro-Boy, but I like Script Wrangler better ... I didn't even ask for that ... just what the J-Man assigned me.

Brandon Rice
03-15-2006, 10:53 PM
Word! I still like my original name too... many things... it can be MANY THINGS :)

Geoff_R
03-15-2006, 11:29 PM
I think the more restrictions that are placed on a film contest, the more it will dampen the creativity of those entering. As is now, all you need to do is shoot with a DVX or HVX and restrain your story to a certain time limit. This allows tons of creativity and results in a variety of work. If we impose budget restraints, camera constraints (jibs, dollies, steadies), sound gear constraints, all we're doing is limiting our creativity.

I loved that in both the zombie and sci-fi fest, there were films all over the map in terms of professionalism. There were clearly some beginners and clearly some professionals. It raises the bar for the entire competition and as these contests continue, the average film will improve overall. In general, the sci-fi entires seemed better than the zombie entries. I think the Hero entries will see a similar rise in quality.

It also gives beginners and non-professionals a chance to really see what can be done with these cameras. These cameras can do great things when in the hands of an experienced / creative user.

I remember a few years ago when the DVX first came out, I was broke at the time and kept telling all my friends, "If I had this camera...I could wake up tomorrow and make a movie, it's that good." I remember saying the same thing about the Apple G5s. It took me a long ass time, lots of work at crappy jobs, but I've finally got the G5 and an HVX to boot. Theoretically, I have the necessary tools to create a film... Whether or not I end up making a 'good' film depends on my skills and creativity... but from the stuff I've seen from the previous competitions, I at least know it can be done. It's evident from some of the work that can be seen on this site.

The professional looking films that blow me away are the ones that inspire me and remind me that although I may not be working with the same sound or lighting gear... that final image is coming through the lens of the same camera I've got in my hands.

Gordon JL
03-16-2006, 05:51 PM
The nature of this particular contest is to celebrate the aspiring artists; the amateurs; this isn't Sundance where everyone is allowed to join; personally, I feel experience level DOES matter -- an unfair level of experience within an industry. Also, those "pros" have access to more professional equipment -- which, no matter what people keep saying, DOES affect the film (with better equipment, it is "easier" to win the Best Cinematography award, for example; there are other awards besides "most original" or "best script"). Another thing in allowing no limits, is that the experienced could simply enter each time; and even when they are making money from their work in the industry, they, in a way, take from those with nothing, those who are "just starting out". This contest, in its nature, is for amateurs. Personally, I feel there needs to be a division somewhere; between personal and professional experience.

To help put things into perspective; let's all pretend Martin Scorcese (and a bunch of other top-notch filmmakers) all of a sudden decide to join the contest -- now, although we would all be extremely honored for them to even consider entering this festival; and no one would really complain (I know I wouldn't) if they did, I'm willing to bet that eventually, if they entered each year, and probably won most of the prizes, you would all consider changeing the rules. This extreme example shows that yes; experience DOES matter -- the question is, where the hell do you draw the line?

spidey
03-16-2006, 06:19 PM
i think anyone with a good idea should give their best not everyone is lucky enough to make something ith certain resources. im lucky enough but even i struggle to make this happen. if it helps the person to figure out how to improve then i know it is good.

As long as you don't make udder shit then you're good in my book but try to improve from the last thing you shot.

Gordon JL
03-16-2006, 06:36 PM
i think anyone with a good idea should give their best not everyone is lucky enough to make something ith certain resources. im lucky enough but even i struggle to make this happen. if it helps the person to figure out how to improve then i know it is good.

As long as you don't make udder poo poo then you're good in my book but try to improve from the last thing you shot.

This is a good take; that you shouldn't care even if you lost -- learn from it. It's a nice attitude to have. But I'd rather have lost in a lightweight to lightweight match versus a lightweight to heavyweight match.


Secondly, there will get to a point that the major pros, probably wouldn't want to enter, as let's face it ... the larger majority of people that enter this fest are either just starting out, or still trying to learn how to maximize their camera (I'm in this category) ... so it'd be like a college grad wanting to enter a contest with a bunch of junior high kids. Where's the challenge for them? There wouldn't be much of one, and that alone will usually keep the big wigs out ... they want a challenge, just like most of us do.

Well, there are prizes to be won... And a lot of rat bastards out there also like winning just for the sake of winning; even if it is against the "junior high". But I guess the "noobies" don't really care, as they're in it "for the learning experience" -- they simply feel gracious and inspired, right?


I think the more restrictions that are placed on a film contest, the more it will dampen the creativity of those entering. As is now, all you need to do is shoot with a DVX or HVX and restrain your story to a certain time limit. This allows tons of creativity and results in a variety of work. If we impose budget restraints, camera constraints (jibs, dollies, steadies), sound gear constraints, all we're doing is limiting our creativity.

Well, it depends on how you set the limitations. You could even argue that limitations give inspiration for more ideas; just like how each DVXFestival has a genre; it's easier to come up with ideas. But it does depend on the limitations. I'm really not sure how to set the limits or requirements, but hey; at least I'm bringing them out into the open for a discussion.

Alex DePew
03-16-2006, 06:58 PM
I'm willing to bet that eventually, if they (Martin Scorcese) entered each year, and probably won most of the prizes, you would all consider changeing the rules.

Poo Poo that. Bring Scorcese on. I'm gonna be taking him on one day. Might as well start now.

Blaine
03-16-2006, 07:02 PM
Well, there are prizes to be won... And a lot of rat bastards out there also like winning just for the sake of winning; even if it is against the "junior high". But I guess the "noobies" don't really care, as they're in it "for the learning experience" -- they simply feel gracious and inspired, right?
Man, that's really condescending. There are all levels of ability within the DVX user community. The fests are done as a way for the members to show off their skills, whatever level they may be at. If you saw the Sci-Fest you saw some incredible shorts along side some shorts that needed some more work. As long as the forum was honest in their review, there was much to be learned and the members will only be that much better for it next time. I didn't hear anyone complaining that things were "rigged" against them. I did see jealousy raise its ugly head once or twice but it was squelched by their peers.

I think if you're in it for the prizes, you're in it for the wrong reason. I'm willing to bet that the prize winners could have purchased the prizes for less than they spent to make their production if that was all it was about.

Everyone wants to put their best foot forward and show what they can do. That's the real competition. Believe me when I tell you that you are going to see marked improvement by some members based on the feedback they received in the last contest. All anyone wants to do here is show and be proud of their work.

WilderWorks
03-16-2006, 07:03 PM
I beat Scorcese in a foot race. Wiped him out. Made him totally question his manhood.

spidey
03-16-2006, 07:04 PM
make a show that you're proud of is important.

WilderWorks
03-16-2006, 07:05 PM
make show that you're poud of is important.

Amen to that! :)

Gordon JL
03-16-2006, 07:07 PM
Poo Poo that. Bring Scorcese on. I'm gonna be taking him on one day. Might as well start now.

LOL. I'd take Scorcese on in a heartbeat. Too bad so many of the prizes reward the technical aspects of filmmaking... And I do like prizes...

spidey
03-16-2006, 07:10 PM
well if we all know scorcese never won first place...... :-D so theres a chances for anyone.

Gordon JL
03-16-2006, 07:16 PM
Man, that's really condescending. There are all levels of ability within the DVX user community. The fests are done as a way for the members to show off their skills, whatever level they may be at. If you saw the Sci-Fest you saw some incredible shorts along side some shorts that needed some more work. As long as the forum was honest in their review, there was much to be learned and the members will only be that much better for it next time. I didn't hear anyone complaining that things were "rigged" against them. I did see jealousy raise its ugly head once or twice but it was squelched by their peers.

I think if you're in it for the prizes, you're in it for the wrong reason. I'm willing to bet that the prize winners could have purchased the prizes for less than they spent to make their production if that was all it was about.

Everyone wants to put their best foot forward and show what they can do. That's the real competition. Believe me when I tell you that you are going to see marked improvement by some members based on the feedback they received in the last contest. All anyone wants to do here is show and be proud of their work.

You do realize this is a contest right? Not some free for all special-olympics?

All jokes aside, I understand where you are coming from. It's important to enter the contest not for the prizes, but because you like telling stories. And I have no doubt that those who entered the contest will be proud of their work. But why not have the competition be fair, so that some contestants wouldn't feel jipped? And the last grand prize was a DVX! I don't know about you, but I wouldn't spend that much making a 5 minute film. The other prizes also seemed pricey; more than what I would spend.

Norm Sanders
03-16-2006, 07:41 PM
Yeah, but that DVX was a USED DVX with goodness only know how many hours were on it. :)

Technically, we only spent $350 hard dollars on our short, PANDORA. But if we were to count production value (not how it looked, but what it would have cost), it would be up in the several thousand range, simply because of the deferred contracts that everyone signed. Even without deferred contract, a flim maker still needs to assume how much a film would have cost had they had to pay for everything (rent or buy), as it'll help them towards budgeting when they really do need to acquire the funds, etc.

And as far as learning a lot from the contests, I don't know about others, but I learn the most simply by going through the process & seeing what works vs. what doesn't ... I tend to not learn too much from people's feedback (there are a few exceptions), simply because by the time I've heard what was lacking, it's something I'd already realized and was planning on addressing in the next project I take on.

So even beyond the forums/feedback of the festival, it's the process of getting the hands dirty, so to speak, and getting comfortable with the nuts & bolts of everything so that you can improve with each one.

And having STELLAR films in the festival, inspires & motivates everyone to try harder, and ask those people the how to's, etc.

Gordon JL
03-16-2006, 07:51 PM
I guess it all depends on how you view these festivals. Personally, I prefer to view them as competition or contests (because of all the prizes at the end); which is why I want it to be fair -- it is a competition for amateurs afterall. I want the underdogs to get a fair shot. You don't pair a beginning beginner tennis player against a seasoned pro.

But a lot fo people are viewing this festival as more of a showcasing of talents; where "fair" doesn't really matter I guess.

Or, it could be both, in which case, I think fairness does matter. If I was to enter such a competition, and lost; I wouldn't take it hard at all. I learned a lot from the experience, and from my peers. But at least I would have known I had a fair chance.

Future user
03-30-2006, 06:28 PM
Gordon,
I know this thread is old, but I've been really busy.
I think you should look at this not as a contest where you are going up against "the pros" but instead as an opportunity to go do the absolute best you can with what you have at hand. I edited some footage with Movie Maker and because of it I got a gig doing thousands of dollars worth of work for an artist and now my work will be seen all over the country. Not because of the technical brilliance but because of what and how I shot.
Do not handicap yourself by thinking you are already defeated, unless you want to lose before you enter. Your only limitation is your mind.
Sure, sweeping crane shots and brilliant sfx are going to look great on screen, but what about the story. Look at the trash Lucas foisted off on us in the last Star Bores film.
Tell us a great story in the best way you can. Tell it from the heart and shoot it the same way. If you don't like the way it looks, go back and shoot it again until you do.
Handicapping a contest only leads to mediocrity. I don't want to win because someone else was hindered.
I want to win because when it was all said and done, my story was the best, my crew the best, my actors the best and my film the best.
(Remember this last line so you can repeat it to all of your friends when this is all over with.)
Think of the Little Engine story.

Vampiresoup
04-03-2006, 05:28 PM
Yeah. I suck and I'm still entering. My budget is the 20 bucks I'll be spending on beer.

SilverWolf
04-03-2006, 06:27 PM
Gordon,
I can't believe the stuff that you've said. Imagine you're the professional and you've entered contest after contest being the amatuer and after losing a lot of them you got good and you became the professional. Now how would you like it if you entered a contest and they said hey Mr. Professional we are going to cripple you by making you work at the level of the amatuers that you tried so hard not to be? Do you think that's fair. In essence the contest is a fight open to everyone. If you can't hack it with the big boys and the little boys don't don your gloves and get in the ring.

I'm going to tell you a story. My martial arts teacher used to be an boxer. When he started out he was 17 training in the gym and they used to put him in with everybody pros and amatuers. Well one day the golden gloves champ comes in and they put him in the ring with him. During the first round while my teacher was back peddling he knocked him out. So the moral of the story is don't underestimate the little guy because he might kick your ass. Sometimes raw skill beats experience so don't be afraid or that will never be you.

Vampiresoup
04-03-2006, 09:17 PM
Yeah! Ninja it up mother f'er! I will have next to NO equipment. I don't care about winning. I just want to make a fun film people will enjoy. There's no such thing as an amature or a pro. There's only 'a crappy filmmaker' and 'a great filmmaker'.

Aaron Marshall
04-03-2006, 09:51 PM
Gordon,
I can't believe the stuff that you've said. Imagine you're the professional and you've entered contest after contest being the amatuer and after losing a lot of them you got good and you became the professional. Now how would you like it if you entered a contest and they said hey Mr. Professional we are going to cripple you by making you work at the level of the amatuers that you tried so hard not to be? Do you think that's fair. In essence the contest is a fight open to everyone. If you can't hack it with the big boys and the little boys don't don your gloves and get in the ring.

I'm going to tell you a story. My martial arts teacher used to be an boxer. When he started out he was 17 training in the gym and they used to put him in with everybody pros and amatuers. Well one day the golden gloves champ comes in and they put him in the ring with him. During the first round while my teacher was back peddling he knocked him out. So the moral of the story is don't underestimate the little guy because he might kick your ass. Sometimes raw skill beats experience so don't be afraid or that will never be you.

Right on!

Ben Sliker
04-03-2006, 10:02 PM
yeah ..."a brief case" had a phenomenal opening dolly shot ... and what did they do it with ... some small PVC taped to the ground. I was floored.

Jack Daniel Stanley
04-03-2006, 10:43 PM
"ghetto from the get go" as they put it.

it's homemade but its a very thouroughly thought out and engineered piece of equipment designed by this guy:
http://www.dvcamerarigs.com/

I'm scared poo pooless on this one. I 'm blocked on my sript. I have NO money now ... not even to feed the actors and crew. And I have no idea if I can pull this off in NYC for no money with all stolen locations. Very intimidating.

These things kill me to put up -- both contests. I go days without sleeping to accomplish them, and I've never had a crew that wasn't just extra bodies -- meaning none of them are filmmakers, they were either sound design students or acting students of mine or friends from theatre or real estate or other real jobs or from camera acting classes. In otherwords you can't say "would you please get the wireless mics from the truck and wire this guy up" or "here's what I wan't to happen with the lights" I have had to do all that and they basically help.

that's why I kept it small for Shed and why ODD Squad was hell to get up.

having moved to NYC form New Orleans though there are users here that want to hook up with me to help on this one, so maybe that will be the trade of that will make it possible ... people that know what a 35mm adaptor is and could be asked to please screw it on thread mount style, rather than just greet me with dumb stares. My New Orleans swingshift crews were great in terms of work ethic -- they just didn't know anything and I've only been shooting since july ... and I have no mentor or training other than DVXuser ... ODD Squad --- A POO POOING SHOT LIST WOULD HAVE BEEN NICE -- never again will I be in that boat!

As Spidey said it's a struggle.

Kholi
04-03-2006, 10:47 PM
"ghetto from the get go" as they put it.

it's homemade but its a very thouroughly thought out and engineered piece of equipment designed by this guy:
http://www.dvcamerarigs.com/

I'm scared poo pooless on this one. I 'm blocked on my sript. I have NO money now ... not even to feed the actors and crew. And I have no idea if I can pull this off in NYC for no money with all stolen locations. Very intimidating.

These things kill me to put up -- both contests. I go days without sleeping to accomplish them, and I've never had a crew that wasn't just extra bodies -- meaning none of them are filmmakers, they were either sound design students or acting students of mine or friends from theatre or real estate or other real jobs or from camera acting classes. In otherwords you can't say "would you please get the wireless mics from the truck and wire this guy up" or "here's what I wan't to happen with the lights" I have had to do all that and they basically help.

that's why I kept it small for Shed and why ODD Squad was hell to get up.

having moved to NYC form New Orleans though there are users here that want to hook up with me to help on this one, so maybe that will be the trade of that will make it possible ... people that know what a 35mm adaptor is and could be asked to please screw it on thread mount style, rather than just greet me with dumb stares. My New Orleans swingshift crews were great in terms of work ethic -- they just didn't know anything and I've only been shooting since july ... and I have no mentor or training other than DVXuser ... ODD Squad --- A POO POOING SHOT LIST WOULD HAVE BEEN NICE -- never again will I be in that boat!

As Spidey said it's a struggle.

I'm right behind you Jack. I've never actually done more than writing, and I'm scared as hell. I'm losing sleep, I'm burned out-- but I'm going to do it. I found help from some great DVXusers, and our collaboration is going to kick ass, whether it wins or not.

Good luck, to all of you.

Jack Daniel Stanley
04-03-2006, 10:49 PM
yeah sounds like you got some good stuff going ... good luck!

Norm Sanders
04-04-2006, 03:42 PM
I hear you, Jack. I'm broke at the moment as well, waiting for a huge bonus check to come in, that unfortunately won't come in until the end of May/June ... so I'm not exactly sure where I'll even get the money from for food & materials, unless I can quickly pull a couple of short term paying jobs together (working on it).

It's interesting to find that the folks that live in LA and NYC are the ones that will probably have the TOUGHEST times securing locations, since all the surrounding folk are so film saavy and have their own media relations departments and/or want extensive cash up front to use the place, require insurance, bonding, etc.

I'm flat out astounded at some of the locations it looks like we're able to pull together on this one for simply copy & credit and/or some simple bartering of production services. We're budgeting our total food & materails to hopefully not exceed $800, and that's a split between 235 Studios and I.

Kholi
04-04-2006, 03:58 PM
I hear you, Jack. I'm broke at the moment as well, waiting for a huge bonus check to come in, that unfortunately won't come in until the end of May/June ... so I'm not exactly sure where I'll even get the money from for food & materials, unless I can quickly pull a couple of short term paying jobs together (working on it).

It's interesting to find that the folks that live in LA and NYC are the ones that will probably have the TOUGHEST times securing locations, since all the surrounding folk are so film saavy and have their own media relations departments and/or want extensive cash up front to use the place, require insurance, bonding, etc.

I'm flat out astounded at some of the locations it looks like we're able to pull together on this one for simply copy & credit and/or some simple bartering of production services. We're budgeting our total food & materails to hopefully not exceed $800, and that's a split between 235 Studios and I.

Yeah, it seems that way. I'm almost AFRAID of trying to secure my prime location here in Los Angeles.. Keeping home alive.

Looks like your budget went up for this one, Norm?

Jack Daniel Stanley
04-04-2006, 04:49 PM
well NY has this super cool deal where you can get a permit for free and shoot almost anywhere --- RIKERS even -- and the FDNY training facility which can act as a fake street facade.
http://www.nyc.gov/html/film/images/photos/FDNY_AERIAL.jpg
Imagine what you could do here

Free Free Free

you can get the permit in a days turn around and even get a cop or two if you need them

the catch is that you have to have one million dollars of insurance! which you could get for $500 dollars for a couple of days but .... ain't got it.

Curugon
04-04-2006, 05:07 PM
I agree with the general consensus here... tools/budget ain't nothing, and can often be a detriment. Texas Fortune couldn't have cost more than a couple hundred bucks, and most of that was spent on food and gas.

Best story on budget I ever heard: at my film school, one student felt overwhelmed by all the other students, who were spending thousands of dollars on their reels. He had pennies to his name, and asked the film chair what he should do. The chairman told him to check out an Arri 16mm from the school, buy some shortends, and go film something.

He found a group of senior citizens playing bocce ball in a park, and documented them. It ended up being the best piece of filmmaking in his entire class, and went on to win awards. He was immediately signed to a major commercial house here in LA.

:)

Norm Sanders
04-04-2006, 06:45 PM
Good story, Sam ... thanks for sharing that. BTW, what are "shortends?"

Jack, I am SO envious of what you guys have in NYC! If we ever went to the city for Portland, OR and/or Vancouver, WA they'd still want money for the permits, take DAYS if not weeks to get, etc ... in addition to all the liability insurance, etc. What a joke.

NYC has the right idea, and that's great that such a large city, and film saavy one at that, is doing such a incredible service for the indie film maker. Too bad it doesn't sound like LA's on par with that ... not that it effects me in any way.

Jack Daniel Stanley
04-05-2006, 12:53 AM
Good story, Sam ... thanks for sharing that. BTW, what are "shortends?" short ends are left over unused pieces of film I believe that havn't been exposed. string them together and you have a reel, right Sam?
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0060084677/104-5330606-5719138?v=glance&n=283155


Jack, I am SO envious of what you guys have in NYC! If we ever went to the city for Portland, OR and/or Vancouver, WA they'd still want money for the permits, take DAYS if not weeks to get, etc ... in addition to all the liability insurance, etc. What a joke.
well you still have to have one million dollars in liability insurance ... that's the only caveat in case you drop a light on a citzen's head.


NYC has the right idea, and that's great that such a large city, and film saavy one at that, is doing such a incredible service for the indie film maker. Too bad it doesn't sound like LA's on par with that ... not that it effects me in any way.
It's designed to get film companies to come here.

But LA has no need to entice people to film there.

New Orleans or the state of Lousisana rather has a tax incentive where you basically get a third of the money you spend back. So a 90 million dollar movie would cost $60 -- a difference of $30 million is an opening weeked!

Like I said, the NY thing is designed to get film companies to come here but happens to benefit indies as well.

Film students have it made the most of all though because they can use their school or film department's insurance and then go shoot in a designated court room or wherever for ABSOLUTELY free -- no insurance to pay for.

Kholi
04-05-2006, 02:23 AM
So, I just bought a one-way to NYC.

Ready to do some damage, Jack? =D