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jack the fool
02-23-2006, 10:55 AM
I'd love some input from directors on this- I'm an actor who's recently begun doing on-camera work. I've been a home recording enthusiast for years and enjoy writing music for film, so I'm thinking I would like to get invovled in the recording/mixing side of film.

Obvious benefits of working in more productions is more experience, networking, and perhaps even quiting my "day job" to work exclusively in film.

I suspect at the low/no budget level there's a lot of 'wearing many hats', but as I move up the ladder would it cause problems?

Thanks,

-j

http://www.soundclick.com/jackthefool

lookatmeimbender
02-26-2006, 10:31 AM
Dpends if you micro manage every time. You would want to have input but if you have other people skilled in there field doing what they do best you just tell them what you want dont get overly bossy. but get what you want. when driecting you will always be mcromanaging actors and camera becuase you're suppose to in some way. that is the final outcome.

david_kuznicki
02-26-2006, 01:00 PM
It's impossible NOT to micromanage certain areas when you're a director. That may be somewhat contrary to traditional logic... but hey, YOU'RE responsible for every facet of the film.

Just make sure that you surround yourself with people that you trust. Then you can micromanage as little as possible.

At least, that's what works for me!

David Kuznicki
Production Manager, WGTE-TV30

jack the fool
02-26-2006, 10:30 PM
ok, to simplify my question:

Would it be a negative for an actor audtitioning for a part in your current production to have been holding a boom in your last production? (what if he gave you great sound?)

Would you be wary of hiring a sound guy who had a decent rig but was a conscientious extra in your last production? (what if he was a talented lead?)

-j

spidey
02-27-2006, 05:18 AM
been there done that.

Matthew B. Moore
02-27-2006, 09:20 AM
ok, to simplify my question:

Would it be a negative for an actor audtitioning for a part in your current production to have been holding a boom in your last production? (what if he gave you great sound?)

Would you be wary of hiring a sound guy who had a decent rig but was a conscientious extra in your last production? (what if he was a talented lead?)

-j
Take a step above where you are at. Never shoot yourself in the foot. Balance the load of work to the amount of crew and amount of actors. If you want to move crew to acting, make sure you have a crew back up that is worth a damn. If not, don't do it. You can't let the tech end of the film suffer just as you shouldn't let the performance slip.
I know this isn't the answer you want to hear, but it is nice and safe.

jpbankesmercer
03-09-2006, 05:17 AM
Working with a budget or without can only help you learn from the inside out. I'm a director,( started as Actor), but I've still worked in most departments, it can never be a bad thing.
Think of it like this...your a gutarist...when do you stop practicing in your bedroom and get out and play?
Learning the process as a Tech will help you deliver as an Actor. IMOP
J

R Gale
03-20-2006, 10:44 PM
ok, to simplify my question:

Would it be a negative for an actor audtitioning for a part in your current production to have been holding a boom in your last production? (what if he gave you great sound?)

-j

How could it be negative? If you're talented and nice to work with, then you'd be a welcome addition to any production,
in whatever capacity you're capable. Doesn't matter what position-- actor, gaffer, director...

If you're a pain to work with, or not good at what you do, then you won't be re-hired. It's that simple.