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Michael Wisniewski
10-30-2005, 05:53 PM
Hi,

I was wondering if anyone could recommend any practical filmmaking DVDs? I finally got through Hollywood Camera Work (http://www.hollywoodcamerawork.us/) and I'm looking for more filmmaking stuff to get into my brain. Fight Scenes for Motion Pictures (http://www.kbproducts.com/) looks very interesting, and I'm waiting for it in the mail.

P.S. Visions of Light is interesting, but I'm looking for something more practical.

Thanks in advance for any replies.

Cheesesailor77
10-30-2005, 09:19 PM
um, not much.

Hollywood Camera Work is the only one that stands out, and I own or have owned a few. Most of them aren't that helpful. Much better to spend that money on equipment you need and practice, you'll leanr so much more that way.

patcrowley
11-01-2005, 11:27 AM
www.filmschoolondvd.com

He was a teacher of mine at the New York Film Academy.

Cheesesailor77
11-01-2005, 11:44 AM
thats cool he was your teacher, but are the dvds worth while?

Chris Messineo
11-02-2005, 08:33 AM
I have the same question. Have you actually seen the DVD's? They look promising, but are a little pricey.

Chris

escozooz
11-05-2005, 11:05 PM
This is probably debatable but try picking up the Project Greenlight DVD's. They are a little dramatic but overall an interesting look into a first time directors trials.

I've only seen the first season and I really liked it.

robo3687
11-05-2005, 11:11 PM
on a side note does anyone know when the "VFX for directors" (by the hollywood camera work mob) is coming out?

Cheesesailor77
11-06-2005, 01:15 AM
the Prject greenlight dvds are awesome. Of coarse they're meant to be entertaining, not really educational, butyou'll probably get something out of it and have lots of fun on the way

filmmaker58
11-06-2005, 11:03 AM
I recomend watching the directors commentary on almost any Robert Rodrigez film. He seems to target it to folmmakers rather than the general blah blah on most commentarys. Also, your Fightscenes DVD is on the way. Enjoy.

Chris Messineo
11-06-2005, 11:56 AM
This is probably debatable but try picking up the Project Greenlight DVD's. They are a little dramatic but overall an interesting look into a first time directors trials.

I've only seen the first season and I really liked it.What I learned from watching Project Greenlight, is that I want to make Independent films without a bunch of studio heads intefering. :)

Chris

Michael Wisniewski
11-09-2005, 04:55 PM
Also, your Fightscenes DVD is on the way. Enjoy.Excellent! Thank you for the follow up! I'm really looking forward to sinking my teeth into your Fight Scenes DVD.

Michael Wisniewski
11-09-2005, 04:56 PM
Here's the full list of DVDs so far:


Fight Scenes for Motion Pictures (http://www.kbproducts.com/)
Hollywood Camera Work (http://www.hollywoodcamerawork.us/)
Advanced Broadcast Camera Techniques (http://www.elitevideo.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=26)
Camera Command (http://cameracommand.com)

Michael Wisniewski
11-16-2005, 11:00 AM
Finally got through the Fight Scenes DVD and really liked it.

It's mainly an introduction to doing martial art stunts on camera, with a focus on keeping everyone safe while making the fight scenes believable.

When you're done, you will have some good basic knowledge on how to make your own Jackie Chan / Kung Fu movies safely and effectively. And while you're not going to make the next "Crouching Tiger" with this DVD, it is a good way to start. If you already know a martial art, this DVD will be very valuable for applying your skills to the camera.

One nice thing is that you can adapt the techniques to all kinds of special effects where people get hit, slapped, thrown, fall etc. and not necessarily in a fight scene. The first thing I did was get some skateboarders and we did a skateboard brawl/slapstick short with the info from the DVD. And though it was an amateur production, the stunts came out looking very good - and painful.

It's worth the $20 to learn how to do effective on camera stunts and it's also a nice gentle introduction to stunt work in general. Martial artists will find that the info on the DVD will give them a good framework for taking their skills on camera.

For those of you who also got or are getting the Hollywood Camera Work DVDs, you can consider the Fight Scenes DVD a shorter but very useful addendum to the massive encyclopedia of the Hollywood Camera Work DVDs.

filmmaker58
11-16-2005, 10:20 PM
Michael, Thanks for the review. We really tried to give a good overview of the basics of stunt fighting for the camera. I'm glad to hear that you were able to use some of the info in your skateboarder short.

lucidz
11-17-2005, 09:44 AM
Michael are you interested in selling the hollywood camera work dvds? I'm definitely interested in buying them if so :)

Michael Wisniewski
11-18-2005, 02:44 AM
Naw sorry, the Hollywood Camera Work DVDs are a keeper. I could see letting them go in a couple of years, after I've absorbed it all, but in the meantime, they're the only references I have sitting on my shelf.

jermz
11-23-2005, 09:30 PM
Here's the full list of DVDs so far:


Fight Scenes for Motion Pictures (http://www.kbproducts.com/)
Hollywood Camera Work (http://www.hollywoodcamerawork.us/)
Advanced Broadcast Camera Techniques (http://www.elitevideo.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=26)
Camera Command (http://cameracommand.com)


which dvd did you find to be most valuable? or are all of them of equal value?

Michael Wisniewski
11-24-2005, 08:07 PM
I haven't started the Advanced Broadcast Camera Techniques DVD yet but I'll post a comparison when I'm done.

Shawn Murphy
12-22-2005, 11:37 AM
Michael, I'd love some feedback on the 'ADVANCED BROADCAST CAMERA TECHNIQUES', as I read elsewhere that it was well worth the money, your comments would be appreciated.

GraBird
12-24-2005, 06:46 AM
I recomend watching the directors commentary on almost any Robert Rodrigez film.

I definitely second that -- and also his "Film School" segments on the first 2 of his trilogy! (The last one was more of an explanation how cool DV is, which we already know and agree with <G>.)

I also got a LOT from the expert commentary from Michael Jeck on the Criterion Collection DVD for Kurosawa's "Seven Samurai". It offers terrific insight to Kurosawa's technique and gives you a lot to think about for directing and cinematography techniques in general. (It's amazing how differently you see movies once you've heard that commentary.) It's over 3 hours long and every minute is filled with valuable insight.

Michael Wisniewski
12-24-2005, 06:21 PM
Michael, I'd love some feedback on the 'ADVANCED BROADCAST CAMERA TECHNIQUES', as I read elsewhere that it was well worth the money, your comments would be appreciated.This 2 DVD set is well worth the money, and compliments the Hollywood Camera Work and Fight Scenes for Motion Pictures DVDs.

The focus of the video is on becoming a better videographer and camera operator. It starts with common basic broadcast techniques and works it's way up from there, with good info on doing it cheaply, and great professional advice on the softer skills of videography. It's "advanced" because it assumes you know how to operate your camera and focuses on acquiring good video. The DVDs cover a wide range of information, and will help anyone improve their video, whether they are a beginner, an enthusiast, or professional. I have a good friend who's a cameraman for CBS and we both had a blast watching and learning from it. So, you'll learn something worthwhile from it, even if you've been doing this for awhile.

In addition, the information is immediately applicable to any movie making endeavour but only overlaps a small bit with the Hollywood Camera Work DVDs. So yes, you'll probably have to get both.

** Several caveats about the video: The presentation is very campy and can feel a little dated because it was originally shot with VHS in mind, around 1997-1999. The DVD menus are just short of Atari 2600 quality, and the sound levels are absolutely schizophrenic, especially on the 2nd DVD. But the content is golden and worth the price of admission.



I'd recommend the Advanced Broadcast Camera Techniques for anyone with a camcorder. It covers a broad range of techniques and information. The skill set is focused on making you a better videographer and camera operator.


If you're more serious about narrative filmmaking, then I'd recommend the Hollywood Camera Work DVDs. It is more narrowly focused on narrative story telling. The skill set is focused on making you a better director/editor/cinematographer.


The Fight Scenes for Motion Pictures DVD is also recommended, not only for movie fighting, but for all sorts of on-camera stunt work. The skill set is focused on making you a better stunt coordinator.


None of these DVDs overlap seriously in anyway, and since most of you are a step or more beyond the normal videocam enthusiast you're just going to have to get all of them.