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arkadeous
10-22-2005, 11:04 AM
Hey Everyone,

I will be backpacking in Europe for an entire month over the summer along with 3 friends. I want to document this trip for our own personal libarary and memories but at the same time I wouldn't mind putting together a documentary about our experience.

We will be traveling via EuroRail to a total of 9 countries over 1 month. This is a second 1 month long trip we're going on together.

1- Any ideas on how to approach this?
2- What equipment to use? Since this trip is still a good amount of time away, I maybe be looking to upgrade to HDV by the time we go. (Tentative equipment budget will be $5,000.)
3- I'm also worried about theft as we will be staying at Hostels and sometimes sleeping on the train between countries.
4- Does anyone have experience documenting this kind of trip?

MTV is doing a show (True Life: Backpacking in Europe) where they will follow two people traveling throughout Europe. I'm not sure when that's going to be done.

Any ideas / suggestions would be appriciated.


Best,
Arkadeous

ericyoung
10-23-2005, 04:16 PM
Depends where you go, but camera bags that don't look like camera bags are a good idea. Some hostels have smaller separate rooms you can book ahead which will be more secure than larger shared dorms, and still don't cost too much more. On trains, sleep with your equipment. Sleeper trains in some countries, although more comfortable, may make you more vulnerable as it may be easier to sneak up on you. Be wary of strangers coming up to you, being friendly, and distracting you while others quietly walk off with your bags. Another clue sometimes is if they invade your personal space, as that is a very effective distraction. In bars, cafes, restaurants and other public spaces, put your stuff away from the thoroughfares and keep a foot on the bags or the straps. As there are 4 of you, that is strength in numbers, so it's unlikely you'll be directly confronted.

Having said that, most people and places in Europe are very safe. So enjoy the trip! Just be aware of your surroundings at all times, especially when tired, and don't advertise your equipment!

Oh. Make sure you have electrical plug adapters and that your chargers are multivoltage compatible.

Josh_Boelter
10-23-2005, 09:03 PM
Some hostels also provide lockers. Sometimes you need your own padlock, so it's best to have one on hand. There are several hostel-rating websites you can check out before you leave.

If you're traveling with three friends and sleeping on a train, take shifts and have one friend stay awake. It's a hassle, but with expensive equipment, worth the trouble.

Last note: talk to locals wherever you visit, even if your grasp of the language sucks. It's almost always more interesting to talk to people from the place you're visiting than to simply find other Americans to hang around (though that can be enlightening as well).

Good night and good luck.

Cheers,

Josh

versioncity1
10-30-2005, 01:55 AM
For a month, don't bother making a documentary, just go and enjoy yourself......

Unless of course you have a really unique story..... what is the story?..... if its you and your mates on a road trip I think you need to ask yourself how interesting thats going to be to watch....

ericyoung
11-15-2005, 03:40 PM
Last note: talk to locals wherever you visit, even if your grasp of the language sucks.

That's good advice. Always start off trying to speak the local language, even if it's to ask if they speak English!

In France, for example, starting off in English may well annoy them. It's like you couldn't be bothered to do a little bit of research on their country that you are visiting.

A simple "Excusez moi. Parlez-vous Anglais, s'il vous plait" would be universally met more sympathetically!

xjeffx
11-20-2005, 03:14 PM
That's good advice. Always start off trying to speak the local language, even if it's to ask if they speak English!

In France, for example, starting off in English may well annoy them. It's like you couldn't be bothered to do a little bit of research on their country that you are visiting.

A simple "Excusez moi. Parlez-vous Anglais, s'il vous plait" would be universally met more sympathetically!

I couldn't agree more. Especially in France. They are incredibly nice and will likely speak English, but if you walk in to a cafe or store and expect them to just speak English, they will be very rude. Be courteous and you'll be surprised how friendly the French are.

Oli.S
11-20-2005, 03:35 PM
If you happen to pass Stuttgart, Germany, let me know.
I can introduce you to the Autobahn. :evil: