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View Full Version : Shooting in high heated area (150F) - is it possible? (lenses fog up)



SGCman
08-14-2017, 03:33 PM
I have a client that wants us to film them oven drying vegetables in their factory. The room they do that in is extremely hot and even going in there fogs up the lenses.

Anyone know if there is a way to shoot this? Thanks in advance!

jagraphics
08-15-2017, 05:10 AM
150 F is 65 degrees real temperature. :-) For electronics (and indeed most of the world) Celsius is used.

You have two problems

1 condensation
2 specification of the electronics.

1 This one is easy: The condensation can be sorted by letting the cameras warm up to ambient temperature. Then clean the lenses

2 This is the more awkward one. Electronics chips come in several grades, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operating_temperature

Most devices are manufactured in several temperature grades. Broadly accepted grades are:

Commercial: 0 to 70 C
Industrial: -40 to 85 C
Military: -55 to 125 C
Nevertheless, each manufacturer defines its own temperature grades so designers must pay close attention to actual datasheet specifications. For example, Altera uses five temperature grades for its products:[1]

Commercial: 0 C to 85 C
Industrial: −40 C to 100 C
Automotive: −40 C to 125 C
Extended: −40 C to 125 C
Military: −55 C to 125 C


The camera's are going to be "consumer" grade. IE max operating temp of 70. that is THEIR OPERATING MAX. not the ambient temperature. Electronics chips , and particularly sensors, generate heat. Certainly more than 5 degrees so if the ambient temperature is 65 the chips are going to hit 70 almost immediately.

In other words it is likely that by the time you have got rid of the condensations the electronics will start failing.


However..... that is not your only problem. the plastics and particularly the rubber will distort/melt . Possibly the metals too. This will give you problems with the controls and things like Zoom. There is no guarantee that when you come back out and things cool down they will be in exactly the same shape as they were when you started. Which is going to make focusing interesting.

I suggest you have a re-think. can you film from outside?
IF not warm up the camera in a warm ambient say 40 degrees and only go in the hot room for say 60 seconds at a time and let the camera cool again.

Greg_E
08-15-2017, 06:43 AM
I would need to assume that you are not putting the camera in the oven but shooting through an inspection window. If they actually need to go in the oven, then they will need to turn the temperature down for those shots (and maybe throw that batch of product in the trash). Otherwise you are going to need to buy or rent a high heat tolerance camera and most of those are of the machine vision quality.

jagraphics
08-15-2017, 06:47 AM
I would need to assume that you are not putting the camera in the oven but shooting through an inspection window.

Even in that case you want to be back from the inspection window.

Bruce Watson
08-15-2017, 11:51 AM
150 F is 65 degrees real temperature. :-) For electronics (and indeed most of the world) Celsius is used.

It's not "most of the world" that's metric, it's all of the world except the USA. Every other country on the planet is metric. Well, someone has to be last, yes? Exceptional, but not in a good way. Sigh...


You have two problems

1 condensation
2 specification of the electronics.


I'll add a third. You are going to have to wear gloves to handle the camera if it gets above around 50C. And if you're going to be in 65C heat, you're only going to be functional for a minute or two at most. Make sure someone is around to pull your wilted tail off the floor before it kills you. Actually, if you hit the floor you can expect burns wherever you contact it, so don't let that happen. IOW, safety first.

What's this going to do to your boots? Just a thought.

If they want this shot, any possibility of shooting through a window (oven door)?

Or fly a POV camera -- like a GoPro Hero-X (whatever version is current) on a small drone. You stay outside and fly it. If the heat kills either camera or drone or both, just bill them for it. They aren't that expensive. But put that in the contract. Along with them buying your melted boots, etc. That's the "plus expenses" section.

jagraphics
08-15-2017, 01:39 PM
It's not "most of the world" that's metric, it's all of the world except the USA. Every other country on the planet is metric. Well, someone has to be last, yes? Exceptional, but not in a good way. Sigh...

I was being kind. :-) Many in the USA don't realise the US uses different systems to the rest of the world for most things. Eventually the US is going to have to change to fit in with the rest of he world. OTOH American is becoming the dominant version of English in the world.