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Jarred Land
08-19-2005, 02:04 AM
Click Here to read the full article (http://www.dvxuser.com/articles/hdedit/)

BLUESPIDER
08-19-2005, 03:31 AM
Good stuff Jarred!
I guess I came to the conclusion that I'm broke and won't be able to go HD for a few years. It be more affordable by then anyway. I figure, if I go HD then I want to go the highest quality uncompressed and from the looks of the chart, 850gigs for 1 hour is a sh*t load of space. Thats almost a freakin terabyte. That's some serious bling! Whoa!

Jarred Land
08-19-2005, 03:40 AM
yeah but if your ever in a position to actually edit uncompressed 1080 footage, your probally making enough money to pay for that fiber array of disks.

bikefilms
08-19-2005, 10:51 AM
Jarred,

A very informative piece. I like how you included a "now and then" price comparisson of the HD videocard. Anyone who paid hundreds for 4 megabytes of RAM should get a chuckle!

On a side note, a requirement to edit HD should be a Customer Base. Aren't the HDTV numbers still pretty low? Around 7% in the U.S.?

-a

Ernest_Acosta
09-21-2005, 01:25 PM
What about Mac requirements?

kmcgrath
10-12-2005, 10:05 AM
Thanks. Your article just cleared up a bunch of nagging questions for me. Very useful and informative!

Edit: Is the "332 Mbps" you list for uncompressed 1280x720/24p based on 10bit RGB? (I did a quick calc using 8 bit, but came up with wrong answer until I used 10bit)

Bignosetw
11-21-2005, 06:38 AM
Dear all

I have just signed up here, even though I have worked with the DVX quite a bit in the past. On the subject of system specs needed for editing HDV: Just to point out that Ulead MediaStudio Pro 8 uses a Smart Proxy system whereby DV or MPEG proxies are created of your HDV files, making it much easier on system resources. You can even edit HDV on a slower notebook for realtime mobile HDV editing - isn't that cool? As soon as you choose to output your final video, the software automatically refers back to your full-res footage. (full disclosure: yes, yes, I work for Ulead, but I am also a freelance producer.)

Read more at: http://www.ulead.com/msp/runme.htm
or read my piece on Ulead and HDV at http://www.ulead.com/spotlight/hd/runme.htm

Although I have played with and like the Sony HDV camcorders, I have just bought my own DVX and used it on a shoot in Japan - LOVED the results.

khmuse
11-21-2005, 06:50 AM
Welcome Bignosetw,

Regarding your post, don't confuse HDV with HD. HDV is a very low data rate consumer format designed to fit on current miniDV storage systems (at either 19 or 25 Mb/s). True uncompressed HD (as is being discussed in this thread) requires much more processing and storage capabilities. Follow the link that Jarred has provided (in the first post of this thread) to get a better understanding of the requirements for HD editing.

sporkme
11-21-2005, 10:27 AM
One thing I would have liked to have seen in the drive speed tests was the same 3.5" drive in both a USB 2.0 and a Firewire 400 and FW 800 enclosure.

I think you'll generally find FW is much better suited to the task as it puts much less load on the host CPU, better handles sustained reads/writes, and better handles chaining more devices together.

Bignosetw
11-21-2005, 08:39 PM
Hah - great, my first post and I put my foot in it ;) Sorry, I am well aware of the difference between HD and HDV, just didn't read the thread properly.

Cheers

Bignose

khmuse
11-21-2005, 08:46 PM
Hah - great, my first post and I put my foot in it ;) Sorry, I am well aware of the difference between HD and HDTV, just didn't read the thread properly.

Cheers

Bignose

We have all stepped in it a time or two. :grin:

Not to worry.

Joe Calabrese
03-28-2008, 08:01 AM
Dear all

I have just signed up here, even though I have worked with the DVX quite a bit in the past. On the subject of system specs needed for editing HDV: Just to point out that Ulead MediaStudio Pro 8 uses a Smart Proxy system whereby DV or MPEG proxies are created of your HDV files, making it much easier on system resources. You can even edit HDV on a slower notebook for realtime mobile HDV editing - isn't that cool? As soon as you choose to output your final video, the software automatically refers back to your full-res footage. (full disclosure: yes, yes, I work for Ulead, but I am also a freelance producer.)

Read more at: http://www.ulead.com/msp/runme.htm
or read my piece on Ulead and HDV at http://www.ulead.com/spotlight/hd/runme.htm

Although I have played with and like the Sony HDV camcorders, I have just bought my own DVX and used it on a shoot in Japan - LOVED the results.

Ok, if your using Ulead Mediastudio, I hate to break it to you, but it is the worst piece of crap I have ever used. I own it. The damn thing slows down and freezes my computer everytime I drop a clip into the timeline. It took me 4 days to edit and complete a 3 minute project. Also, there is so much unused screen space. I have a 15" screen and it is really a pain have such a small timeline. I'm going to get FCP.

Jockomo
03-28-2008, 03:42 PM
Jarred,

Aren't the HDTV numbers still pretty low? Around 7% in the U.S.?

-a

Even so, if you are doing projects for clients in SD, then they may find they need it in HD in only a few years. It can mean more work for you of course, but then again you should be looking ahead for your clients sake.

I do 3d animation mostly, but everything I create now I am doing in HD, even though I still deliver mostly SD. I just know I will be getting calls for a HD version, so I just as soon do them now.


A question for Jarred (or anyone else who knows) , if you are working in uncompressed, how much does a blackmagic card help (if you have a quad core processor, a RAID and plenty of RAM) ?

I always understood them to have hardware decompressors, and thus could work with compressed footage better, but do they also give a benefit to uncompressed work other than just display?