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View Full Version : scanning old photos to use in a documentary, PPP?



maltess2
04-27-2013, 01:44 AM
Hello, I need to scan photos to be included in a documentary edited at 2K, what ppp setting should I use? 300, 600, etc,


Cheers

paulears
04-27-2013, 02:12 AM
It's doubtful if many scanners really do resolve what their pixel count indicates - so scan a real photograph (or a camera test chart if you have one) so you are using a source with considerable detail. Failing that, scan a piece of fine cloth, so you can use the threads as fine detail. Scan it in every resolution you have available, and then expand the image and look at the results. On my Samsung 3 in one, the 1200 setting (it's best) is not - the 600 setting is actually better - the 1200 setting has artefacts that appear to have been created in the scan? On the HP, the 1200 setting is best? The scanners are quite like cameras - the ones that can pull detail out of the dark areas produce different images from the ones that can't. Others seem to find it difficult at the white end. I think your own experiments will produce the best setting for your own equipment.

maltess2
04-27-2013, 04:12 AM
Thanks, I will do that, but out of curiosity, is there any standard for a 2K movie? last time I did this, the photos were for a SD DVCPro project, and I remenber the general consensous was that 150 ppp was about right

ellsworth
05-08-2013, 11:31 PM
HD footage is rated at 1920 x 1080 pixels at 72 dpi (Note that DPI is mostly used for printing)
The dpi/ppi that you're request is determined based on your project settings which you mentioned is 2k: 2048 x 1152 or 2048 x 1080 (depending on preference)
So, your scans need to be minimum 2048 x 1080 or 2048 x 1152 at 72 dpi in order to be usable.

I'd recommend scanning your images at 300 dpi for safe keeping even though 72 dpi is enough.
You can never go wrong with having more information to begin with.

Hope this helps

paulears
05-09-2013, 03:31 AM
There's no real reason not to scan at the best setting your scanner can handle (if it really is that high res) as even the biggest files are small compared to video.