PDA

View Full Version : Help on getting funding for film



GeneralO'neill
07-07-2005, 10:52 AM
I need money for a short film that i am getting ready to do. I have it all written, but without at least some money the whole project is scrapped. All the money that I do make is going into other things. Please help.

Mike_Donis
07-07-2005, 12:06 PM
Do you know any generous millionaires?

thartley
07-07-2005, 12:33 PM
Please take a number and have a seat.

HorseFilms
07-07-2005, 12:47 PM
Borrow a friend's Hi8 and rock that thing.

Slimothy
07-07-2005, 01:34 PM
Car wash time.

Rosestar
07-07-2005, 02:29 PM
Please take a number and have a seat.

Your number, 333,656,565.

Now serving: #11.

Welcome to filmmaking.

GenJerDan
07-07-2005, 03:32 PM
You know who seems to do a lot of financing of films? Doctors/Dentists. The ones who operate out of smallish groups. You might approach such a beast...just be sure to have a good proposal.

There's also the various State entertainment/film commissions.

Dan

thisiswells
07-07-2005, 03:58 PM
Much of the independent film work I've done is financed by the independently wealthy. I'd rather be a crew member most of the year than a writer/director two weeks every three years. Getting financing for a movie is almost as hard as being a professional athlete and being sponsored by Nike. I don't know where they get their money, but eventually they do. Hiphop films are drug money; no questions there. The reflective/self-examination kind of films are real estate investors, almost always. Anything else is usually put together by students in art school whose parents finance their projects (not that there is anything wrong with that).

Essentially, if you want to make a movie you'll need to pay for itself or be BLUESPIDER.

craigbowman
07-07-2005, 05:07 PM
Get the following book and do what it says.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0446674621/qid=1120781128/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-9910933-2091310

Rosestar
07-07-2005, 07:30 PM
Get the following book and do what it says.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0446674621/qid=1120781128/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-9910933-2091310

I've seen that guys stuff advertised, Dov, what kinda name is that? Is he for real? Anyone know?

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1167662/

I checked this, doesn't seem to have many movies under his belt.

I wish this quy would do a real "how-to" book.

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000339/

GeneralO'neill
07-08-2005, 10:19 AM
Thanks for your help. I didn't even know where to start before. I will check some of these ideas out, and if they don't work I guess i could take a night job flippin burgers.

Jaime Valles
07-08-2005, 12:13 PM
As long as you have a killer screenplay, all you need is a $300 MiniDV camera, $50 worth of tapes, pals willing to work for a couple of weekends, a $100 Firewire Hard Disk, and a friend's iMac. Throw in some chips and cookies for catering, and you've got a film for less than $500.

The hardest part is writing the killer screenplay, which costs $0 (if you've got access to a computer). Fundraising is cake next to writing.

Do you have a credit card?

theHeadlessPuppy
07-08-2005, 02:35 PM
Fundraising is cake next to writing.




I'd like to know what planet you're from, because I will travel there in my spaceship right away.

Having a killer script and trying to make it work out with your friends is a joke. Also, 'killer script' could have millions of different interpretations, ie, for a Hollywood tycoon your script could be great, for an independant director it could stink.

Of course, if all you want is to make millions out of it pleasing some Hollywood hotshot at some big studio, then when not just become a car salesman or a stockbroker. The chances of succeeding are higher and you don't have to pretend to be an 'artist'.

Jay Rodriguez
07-11-2005, 10:44 AM
I'd like to take a number in the "I need funding line"..... lol

Kirk Gillock
07-11-2005, 02:13 PM
DVXuser has a lot of answers, but funding for films is not as simple as "here's a link." The best you can do is hunt around for grants, ask for friends and family to help you fund it, or save, save, save. You'd be surprised how much money you can save in just a few months. During that time you can fine tune the script to perfection.

Good luck!

wabbit
07-11-2005, 04:27 PM
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0142002208/qid=1121123685/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-7597656-7742342?v=glance&s=books

Nothing specific about funding your film, but will take you thru what other, now successful, filmmakers went thru on their first project. The Coen brothers spent something like 2 years just fundraising for Blood Simple. If was a different atmosphere back then for independent films but you at least get the idea of what to expect. Great read for aspiring filmmakers regardless.

Of course there is always the R Rodriguez route of a zero budget film. The production triangle really comes into play here. Assuming you want it good, you have to choose between quick or cheap.

craigbowman
07-11-2005, 06:19 PM
DVXuser has a lot of answers, but funding for films is not as simple as "here's a link." The best you can do is hunt around for grants, ask for friends and family to help you fund it, or save, save, save. You'd be surprised how much money you can save in just a few months. During that time you can fine tune the script to perfection.

Good luck!

Quentin Tarantino recommended Dov as the guy that taught him how to finance his movies and was responsible for his being able to finance Reservoir Dogs. But then, what would he know?

natob2
07-13-2005, 11:05 AM
SHORTS ARE A CHARITY CAUSE. Better have a rich uncle, generous parents or a lifestyle that allows you to save money. Yes there are grants and such, but the are usually for films that directly benefit a community, or a cause...something like a documentary that raises awareness about illiteracy in a community or something of the like. In college while trying to raise money for a short film I went door to door in the wealthiest area of hometown asking for money but that didn't work too well. I ended up getting help from my parents and money right out of my own pocket.

For a feature...I just think this is whole different story. As far as I'm concerned, features are business propositions. I feel way more confident raising money for a feature than I do a short because it's a business endeavor as a opposed to a charity cause.

I must say that raising money for shorts and features well are both very daunting tasks.

Every working director in Hollywood has a good sense of the art as well as the business aspect and they balance them well. This is essential.

Josh_Boelter
07-14-2005, 08:55 AM
I think Calvin (from Calvin and Hobbes, not John Calvin) once set up a lemonade stand and sold lemonade for $100 per glass. He didn't have much luck, but maybe you could try that. Or maybe you could set up a roadside psychiatric stand like Lucy used to do in Peanuts.

Hmm, perhaps I should stop looking to the comics for advice.

Jeremy Ordan
08-08-2005, 10:37 AM
I can tell you exactly how to raise the money, and I wont even charge you for it. Come up with a list of what you need. A very exact and precise list. Think about what you need, not about what you want (example: if you have no camera, do you need to go buy a new DVX or do you need to look at a used one... You can get a used DVX100 for about $2000 whereas a new DVX100A is $3400). After you have your list seperate everything into now and then post production. For example, you will need a legal copy of Vegas (or whatever NLE you want). When you have your list of now and laters, add up the nows, and then add up the laters. Once you have those figures, take 25% off your now list, and that is what it is worth when you sell it to buy your laters. At this point, you know what you need now. That simple.
Now to actually get the money, this is the easiest part in the world, and if you know anyone you can do it. It is a simple five step program:
1. Go out right now and rent the movie PI
2. Put the DVD in your DVD player
3. Go to production notes on the DVD
4. Go to the second page of production notes
5. Read the production notes

(To make PI, the producers went around to people they knew and asked people to invest $100. They promised a return of $150 if the movie made any money, and if it didn't they said they were sorry. They raised $68,000 this way)

True, this is not the fastest way to get your money, but if you have a project that you believe in, and if you believe in yourself, this will get you to where you want to be.

From my experience, no one is going to give you all the funding you need. There are people in my family that wont give me a dime, but as long as you stay focused on your goal you're fine. Come up with a realistic list, do you really need a monitor (I would say yes, but it's up to you), do you need to buy a brand new Bogden (I actually do need to... My brother borrowed mine yesterday and somehow managed to run it over with his car)... Be realistic, be simplistic, and create the best product possible.

Angrius
08-08-2005, 11:44 PM
Much of the independent film work I've done is financed by the independently wealthy. I'd rather be a crew member most of the year than a writer/director two weeks every three years. Getting financing for a movie is almost as hard as being a professional athlete and being sponsored by Nike. I don't know where they get their money, but eventually they do. Hiphop films are drug money; no questions there. The reflective/self-examination kind of films are real estate investors, almost always. Anything else is usually put together by students in art school whose parents finance their projects (not that there is anything wrong with that).

Essentially, if you want to make a movie you'll need to pay for itself or be BLUESPIDER.


Hip hop movies are made from drug money..what kind of an igonorant statement is that...ridiculous and stereotyping. What's next..black people buy there cloths from the crack they sell?

vicente velasco
08-09-2005, 12:02 AM
yea save some money and make your movie

christopherthomas
08-19-2005, 10:05 AM
I wish this quy would do a real "how-to" book.

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000339/

I highly recommend reading both Corman's autobiography:

How I Made a Hundred Movies in Hollywood and Never Lost a Dime (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0306808749/qid=1124470824/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-4874731-0472151?v=glance&s=books)

and former Corman employee Beverly Gray's book:

Roger Corman: Blood-Sucking Vampires, Flesh-Eating Cockroaches, and Driller Killers (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1560255552/qid=1124470824/sr=2-2/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_2/102-4874731-0472151?v=glance&s=books)

Neither is a "How To" book, but both offer plenty of insight into how Corman ran his different studios.

DMProductions
08-22-2005, 09:47 PM
Chris, which one would you recommend starting with?

Another interesting read is "Rebel without a Crew" by Robert Rodriquez.

Jaime Valles
08-23-2005, 10:24 AM
I'd like to know what planet you're from, because I will travel there in my spaceship right away.

Having a killer script and trying to make it work out with your friends is a joke. Also, 'killer script' could have millions of different interpretations, ie, for a Hollywood tycoon your script could be great, for an independant director it could stink...

If you build it, they will come. Seriously. If you can write a screenplay that has people hooked from the beginning, racing through all the way to the completely unexpected, intense climax and leaves them wanting more at the end, you've got a "killer screenplay".

If you can do that, all you have to do is show the screenplay to a few people with money that are interested in film. That's all. But it won't work unless you have an unstoppable script, which is, of course, the hard part.

A fantastic script will attract investors, crew, designers, and good actors. An ok, mediocre, so-so, or bad script will get you nowhere very fast (it might get you amateur actors, because they'll usually do anything just to say they're in a movie.)

And I'm not talking about trying to get rich or living the easy life. God knows trying to be a successful filmmaker is "like trying to find a needle in a stack of needles" (name that quote!). You can't rely on luck, or your rich uncle Winthrop. You can only rely on your talent as a filmmaker. Nobody will give you a dime if you haven't proven you've got what it takes, and the only way to do that (when you haven't already made a movie to show for it) is with the use of a killer script. If you can draw, use storyboards to illustrate some key scenes as well. Write it, re-write it, and then polish it 17 more times. And then, re-write it again. Let someone whose professional opinion you respect and trust read the thing, and then re-write some more.

Write the script. If it's excellent, the money will follow. Really.

pmark23
08-23-2005, 07:26 PM
If you build it, they will come. Seriously. If you can write a screenplay that has people hooked from the beginning, racing through all the way to the completely unexpected, intense climax and leaves them wanting more at the end, you've got a "killer screenplay".

If you can do that, all you have to do is show the screenplay to a few people with money that are interested in film. That's all. But it won't work unless you have an unstoppable script, which is, of course, the hard part.

...

Write the script. If it's excellent, the money will follow. Really.


Bwaaahaahaa!!!

That is soooo untrue!

The net is flooded with really-good unproduced "amateur" screenplays. Visit Helium or any of the number of other peer-review screenwriting sites. There's an awful lot of crap as well, but the good stuff is easy to find -- and there's a lot of it.

Hollywood and independent producers are flooded with excellent screenplays from established writers (why they continue making crap movies is another story.)

The problem is that the screenplay has to fit a particular producers EXACT requirements before it'll be produced. In Hollywood this mean that the right stars can be attached or that it'll fit whatever genre they think will be big next year. For indy producers this means that it can be filmed cheaply in few locations with no-name or B-list actors.

What this boils down to is that unless you're writing on spec or hire for a producer buddy of yours, there's little chance anyone will pick up your script -- unless you do it yourself or make an effort to sell it yourself (which means that you know who NEEDS to buy it.)

There's a huge demand now for easy-to-shoot indy features, but writing a screenplay to meet these requirements is a lot harder than writing a "blockbuster" -- and there's still no guarantee that it'll get produced. There's certainly no money in it.

The catch is that you will need to show previous screenplays that you've written -- which don't suck -- so you still need to go through the effort of learning the craft, honing and rewriting. It will take years to get the minimum of three GOOD scripts (which will in most likelyhood never be produced) before someone will feel confident in you to get you to write something that'll fit their meagre requirements -- and you won't get paid for it because chances are they're starting-out as directors, and will butcher your screenplay making an awful, unwatchable film. But after you've been through this a few times, you'll get more acclaim (if you don't suck) and will eventually get somewhere. Of course if you don't put a shotgun in your mouth and blow your head off first.

If you look at the careers of most professional screenwriters, you'll see that they'll have gone through this process -- and/or were close friends of a producer or director and happened to be in the right place at the right time with the RIGHT screenplay.

I think the only realistic/feasible route for a starting writer is to either do it themselves, or align themselves with some upcoming directors/production companies and hope that some sort of synergy happens.

Writing a screenplay and waiting for people to come to you is a pipedream.

christopherthomas
08-24-2005, 01:24 PM
Chris, which one would you recommend starting with?

Another interesting read is "Rebel without a Crew" by Robert Rodriquez.

I recommend starting with Corman's autobiography, then reading the one by his former employee.

Rodriguez's book is great for inspiration, but he doesn't place nearly enough emphasis on the dozens of crappy home movies he made on his dad's camcorder. By the time he made Bedhead and El Mariachi, he had already worked out many of the kinks and limitations that plague most first-time filmmakers. At least he's honest about how he got his foot in the door in Hollywood.

Two more books that I read every year for inspiration are by Lloyd Kaufman, the President of Troma Studios and the Creator of the Toxic Avenger:

All I Need to Know About Filmmaking I Learned from the Toxic Avenger: The Shocking True Story of Troma Studios (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0425163571/qid=1124914880/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-2149087-6028937?v=glance&s=books)

Make Your Own Damn Movie!: Secrets of a Renegade Director (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0312288646/qid=1124914880/sr=2-2/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_2/102-2149087-6028937?v=glance&s=books)

If you ever get a chance to meet Kaufman at a convention, take a few minutes and talk with him even if you don't like Troma's stuff. His enthusiasm for filmmaking is very infectuous.

Jaime Valles
08-24-2005, 02:05 PM
I think the only realistic/feasible route for a starting writer is to either do it themselves, or align themselves with some upcoming directors/production companies and hope that some sort of synergy happens.

This is EXACTLY what I'm saying one should do! I never said you should write the killer screenplay and send it in to Warner Bros. and sit back, waiting for them to show up with a $20,000,000 check. Ain't gonna happen.

What you need to do, as pmark23 said, is to write a great screenplay, in order to put together a super-low-budget independent film. If the story is really good, it won't matter that it was shot with a MiniDV camera and edited on an iMac. If it's excellent, the "look" of the movie won't matter much.

Writing a screenplay and waiting for people to come to you is a pipedream.
I completely agree. Write the screenplay, and go FIND people. If the screenplay rocks, you'll find folks interested. Again, not Paramount or Universal, but people with the means to fund a $100,000 indie film. That's about all you need.

bob_schubring
08-24-2005, 03:23 PM
Thank you for posting a helpful answer on this topic. My own experience as a first-time producer was, I joined pro.imdb.com and was trying to find a place to pitch a script. I failed miserably. Then I ran into a young broke kid with a good idea for a documentary and no money. He gave me a detailed budget that added up to $ 15,000. (He got two other replies on the forum, who basically told him it was impossible to raise money to make indie films and were rather rude about it.)

After looking over the budget, I suggested some ways to cut it back to about $ 7,500. He liked it and we signed a contract. We had some artistic disputes, and I was either dumb enough or smart enough to give him full artistic control as director, and retain full financial control as producer. 2/3 of the way through principal videography (of COURSE, I bought a DVX100A for the job! That was after the kid taught me what a DVX100A was!), we ran low on money and inspiration. Then we interviewed three people who gave us a whole new take on our subject matter. We skipped the glib ending that the kid wanted and that I thought was too...glib. We went with a solid, hard-hitting ending, that leaves viewers with the shivers. "That actually happened HERE?", they wonder.

Bottom line: Get started working, and serendipity happens. Don't get started working, and you can become one of those idiot naysayers who never accomplished anything but says he knows all the answers as to why it cannot be done. And get used to idiot naysayers, because in reality, only about 2 percent of the population have the foresight to plan for their own retirement...even though we all know aging is inevitable..."most people would sooner die than think. In fact, they unquestionably do". (Bertrand Russell).

PS: If the naysayers want to call my bluff, they can email me privately for tickets to the premiere. Did I mention the tickets will cost money and there will be travel involved to attend it?

:shocked: "May I have a glass of water, please?"

Sumfun
08-24-2005, 09:54 PM
yea save some money and make your movie

This sounds like an oxymoron to me :evil:

MattC
08-24-2005, 10:15 PM
Hip hop movies are made from drug money..what kind of an igonorant statement is that...ridiculous and stereotyping. What's next..black people buy there cloths from the crack they sell?

They don't? Hmmm..... That's how us Italian guys do it... You think Armani pays for itself???

:cheesy:

Cryogenic Filmworks
01-13-2006, 07:08 PM
I've seen that guys stuff advertised, Dov, what kinda name is that? Is he for real? Anyone know?

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1167662/

I checked this, doesn't seem to have many movies under his belt.

I wish this quy would do a real "how-to" book.

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000339/

I have been to one of Dov's seminars here in the Dallas area. Enjoyed it. Funny that your second link was Corman because that is who Dove used to work for as a production manager I believe he said.

bob_schubring
01-18-2006, 07:19 PM
Funny. That's what I like about documentary work. Pick a topic you care about, and the story tends to tell itself. Come visit www.truehigh.com to get an idea about the process...we started out knowing something wasn't right about the War On Drugs...but SHEEZ did we get shocked by what we learned!

Lawsuit_Boy
01-19-2006, 03:14 PM
well, I saved up some money, and I somehow found a bunch of people willing to make donations to the production for a feature I'm shooting in a few months. Try asking for donations

Draccan
01-22-2006, 12:36 PM
Save little money yourself... Buy 2 DVX100s, anamorphic adapters, make homemade soundpoles for your mics, get a few wireless transmitters/receiverers/quality mics, get a sound recorder, buy some lamps from the nearest paintshop for 15$ a piece.. Lots of DV tapes..
Try to find unemployed actors who wants to work free for the experience.. There are plenty of those... Write a damn fine screenplay... Watch tons of good movies to inspire you and notice camera movements / cuts etc..

Then make your movie for your own money...

Good part is if you succeed, then you can put all the earnings into your own production company....

.................................................. anyways that's my plan :thumbsup:


Good luck !

elvworks
02-26-2006, 07:42 PM
When George Lucas was asked in an interview, "Why do you make movies?" He answered, "I have to."



All the best,
Rick

Philippe Orlando
03-02-2006, 03:40 PM
I can't believe somebody is asking for money.

If you don't have talen attached, actors, directors, DP
NO money will come. ZIp, niet, nada, rien.

Think about it.
If you were an investor and a guy like you come to see you in your office and ask you money.

After you ask the guy the following questions:

Do you have any stars or any professionals that has a proven track record in the movie industry=somebody who will make your movie sold

And he says no

Why would you give him money?


The answer: Write as story that doesn't require any money or almost nothing.
Remember Clerks? That was terrible, couldn't watch it, I think Smith is a not talent, but it worked.
Do the same.

Now, keep in mind, people want to be fed, lodged, transportated etc...

I believe that associating movie making and no money is an oxymoron

Carcaridon
03-02-2006, 04:02 PM
I believe that associating movie making and no money is an oxymoron

Rodriguez got away with it. Seemed to work just fine for him.

Naanan
03-02-2006, 04:25 PM
I have never worked with anyone that wanted to be "Transportated", sounds like fun though. Perhaps the next gig I get, I will work in a Transportating clause.

Really though man, you need to lighten up. People come up with money all the time for films. I mean to a lesser degree Resivoir Dogs had really low name talent in it. They were all has beens or never were's or Chris Penn. I guess Kietel had some clout. Man it has been my experience that these days everyone wants to be in the movie business. You find a mortgage broker (quick though those guys are going to be hurting by the end of the year), dentist, any one that has more money than brains and just plain loves the movies, they will give you money. The caveat here is that you have to know what you are talking about. You need an investor kit, production schedules, a copy of the final draft of the script. Pictures of the principal actors, storyboards, post promotional plans, helpful contacts etc etc etc. If you go into a room of twenty "professionals" that decided to hear your pitch, and you pitch them like you have it all down but the funding, I bet 2 of them will write you a check of some kind.

The bottom line is that if you shrivel up and die when someone laughs in your face and says NO, YOU ARE A FRIGGIN MORON, then you need to have a different passion. Thatís it.

All my life I have confronted situations where I thought "I could never afford that camera and all those expensive lights" but I decided I wanted that more than anything, more than a nice car, more than a high maintenance girlfriend, more than a nice place to live, more than a great TV set, more than a wardrobe that will get me a high maintenance girlfriend, more than ANYTHING, and I have always gotten what I really wanted. Most people aren't willing to make sacrifices for what they really want. Getting what is good is easy, getting that which makes you great takes great pain and sacrifice. The pain you feel right now is growth.

Blaine
03-02-2006, 04:34 PM
Rodriguez got away with it. Seemed to work just fine for him.
Yes he did. But he still spent $7000 (in 1992 dollars). He had some other things going for him, as well i.e. a large amount of talent and drive. The bottom line is it is still going to cost SOMETHING. Be prepared for that. You can still make it happen, you just have to be creative. :beer:

Carcaridon
03-02-2006, 05:35 PM
Yes he did. But he still spent $7000 (in 1992 dollars). He had some other things going for him, as well i.e. a large amount of talent and drive. The bottom line is it is still going to cost SOMETHING. Be prepared for that. You can still make it happen, you just have to be creative. :beer:

Completely true, but he paved the way. Today we have access to tools, cameras, and software that he didn't have. Right now, I have the gear to make a completely feature, edit it, and get it out to the masses. All right here where I sit (might need some lights). It's the best time there's ever been to be creative, I think. We have all the tools open for us.

Now, will it cost? Of course. Money, time, sanity. All of the above. I went into a great deal of debt to get my camera gear. Am I worried? Oh yeah. But I figure if I don't trust myself enough to dump my own money into my dream, no one else will trust me with anything either. It's just a matter of using everything you have to fullfill your dream.

Now if that darn IDX kit would just get here. :)

Blaine
03-02-2006, 05:37 PM
Completely true, but he paved the way. Today we have access to tools, cameras, and software that he didn't have. Right now, I have the gear to make a completely feature, edit it, and get it out to the masses. All right here where I sit (might need some lights). It's the best time there's ever been to be creative, I think. We have all the tools open for us.

Now, will it cost? Of course. Money, time, sanity. All of the above. I went into a great deal of debt to get my camera gear. Am I worried? Oh yeah. But I figure if I don't trust myself enough to dump my own money into my dream, no one else will trust me with anything either. It's just a matter of using everything you have to fullfill your dream.

Now if that darn IDX kit would just get here. :)
GREAT ATTITUDE! Now get out there and DO IT!! :thumbsup:

RafaelFC
03-03-2006, 06:29 AM
Well for my feature film i developed a strategy i plan on using that i think is gonna be pretty damn effective.
Instead of wasting your own money, time and brainmeats just making your movie then go around with a feature that let's face it, most producers won't sit for 1:30 hours for a film they initially have zero interest in.

I wrote my feature with that in mind, and created a little story arc during the first act that has some resolution but leaves the door wide open for the rest of the movie (which is already written), i'll be shooting those first fifteen pages with my own money and time, then i'll be shopping around for partners and investors showing them the first fifteen minutes of my film.

If things go bad, i won't have spent time and money to have some movie stuck in my hands. Plus i'll have a cool short film to show my friends and family.
If it goes well, i'll just shoot the rest of it, since i'll be doing it digital anyway.

Carcaridon
03-03-2006, 07:30 AM
Well for my feature film i developed a strategy i plan on using that i think is gonna be pretty damn effective.
Instead of wasting your own money, time and brainmeats just making your movie then go around with a feature that let's face it, most producers won't sit for 1:30 hours for a film they initially have zero interest in.

I wrote my feature with that in mind, and created a little story arc during the first act that has some resolution but leaves the door wide open for the rest of the movie (which is already written), i'll be shooting those first fifteen pages with my own money and time, then i'll be shopping around for partners and investors showing them the first fifteen minutes of my film.

If things go bad, i won't have spent time and money to have some movie stuck in my hands. Plus i'll have a cool short film to show my friends and family.
If it goes well, i'll just shoot the rest of it, since i'll be doing it digital anyway.

Almost exactly what I'm doing with two projects.

SilverWolf
03-03-2006, 07:35 AM
That is the same thing the Guys in Broken Did