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View Full Version : GH2 Nikon mount 11-16 tokina to m 4/3 adaptor



MTS
04-27-2012, 10:23 AM
just want to ask you guys what's the best adaptor for my nikon mount 11-16 tokina and 17-50 tamron nikon mount to my gh2. thanks in advance.

dcloud
04-27-2012, 11:20 AM
novoflex

vealti
04-29-2012, 04:57 PM
+1 on the Novaflex. Get the G mount version.

MTS
04-29-2012, 08:27 PM
thank you very much

LanceOregon
04-30-2012, 11:22 PM
+1 on the Novaflex. Get the G mount version.


What is the advantage of the G mount version?

tommyp
05-01-2012, 07:52 AM
What is the advantage of the G mount version?


Allows you to change aperture on lenses that don't have an external aperture ring like the tokina. Or the other nikon g mount type lenses.

charlie_orozco
05-02-2012, 07:44 PM
But isn't it that the Nikon version has an iris ring already? That's the reason we want Nikon lenses on the GH2 instead of the Canon ones (aesthetic and fanboy preferences aside).

Gary Huff
05-02-2012, 08:15 PM
No, Nikon G mount lenses do not have a manual aperture ring.

Philip Goetz
05-03-2012, 04:30 AM
We have a KIPON for $125 that works. I used it to shoot a jazz jam two days ago. It's demo.

tommyp
05-03-2012, 07:45 AM
But isn't it that the Nikon version has an iris ring already? That's the reason we want Nikon lenses on the GH2 instead of the Canon ones (aesthetic and fanboy preferences aside).

You want the nikon lenses so you can have the option of adjusting the aperture with the aperture ring on the lens (non G) or mechanically with a ring on the adapter (G lenses). EOS lenses have electronic aperture control which means you ether have to build a leaf aperture into the adapter or find an adapter with the electronics built in $$.

The nikon G's have a lever on the back of the lens so the adapter can actuate the aperture mechanically and not electronically. The older lenses just have the aperture ring so those are the easiest to use.

http://philipbloom.net/2010/12/17/ne-adaptor-for-using-you-canon-eos-lenses-on-gh1-gh2-af101/

M. Gilden
05-03-2012, 09:59 AM
But isn't it that the Nikon version has an iris ring already? That's the reason we want Nikon lenses on the GH2 instead of the Canon ones (aesthetic and fanboy preferences aside).

You may be mistaking modern "G" lenses with vintage manual ones (also known as "F"). We love vintage lenses around here because back then, aperture was all controlled manually via a ring on the lens. But these days, cameras have been redesigned to allow automatic control of the iris from the camera body. With the exception of a few expensive modern "D" lenses which offer a manual ring as well as automatic controls, current Nikon glass is all automatic aperture, with no way to control it externally.

But, unlike Canon which is entirely electronic, the iris on automatic Nikon lens is controlled with a physical lever that the camera pushes with a motor. So, an appropriate adapter can be had that will offer you a ring to rotate which will push that lever.
This is why GH users tend to prefer Nikon glass to Canon.

But there is a tradeoff- the ring adapters that push the iris lever don't have any markers or any indication as to what aperture you are setting to. You'll need to eyeball it through the display. In this regard, I actually like using EOS lenses from my Canon because I can actually set it to a specific aperture on a Canon body first (I still keep at least one Canon body in my bag at all times for stills and occasional video), pop off the lens and have it "stuck" at the predetermined aperture. The problem is that I can't adjust it without taking the lens off.

Meanwhile, for Nikon glass, I opted for the far cheaper Fotodiox G to M4/3 adapter. The novoflex is really nice and better built, but considering the limitations (all of these adapters are easily adjusted accidentally and still offer no way to determine what F-stop you are at), I just couldn't justify spending the extra money on it.
Either way, you can't go wrong IMO.