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flotone
05-20-2005, 11:09 AM
Hello all and thanks for taking your time reading my message. I am 24 yrs. old and I have this edge to become a director. I don't know how I can explain it but I see each shot in my head whenever I close my eyes. I have this thing where I know if I work hard and put time into directing films I can do it. Now my question is this, Out of every independent film director out there, What makes me different? Why is my script worth watching? Should I just put this behind me and go on with my working life? Does anybody feel the same way?


Thanks
Tone

Jim Brennan
05-20-2005, 12:58 PM
I think it's normal to have doubts. But there are 2 things I would point out to you.

1) Directing is a craft; a skill. You learn how to do it the same way you learn how to do anything: education (not to be confused with schooling) and practice. People envision a mystical and unattainable gift that directors have, or don't have. Although I certainly believe that some people may have more natural talent, it is a learned skill. One which most people lack the determination to see through. That's one of the many things about filmmaking that is the same as everything else in life.

2) You will measure your own success. If, like most of the people here, you enjoy shooting, writing, editing, etc because it's a way to express yourself; if you feel like you overcome obstacles to achieve your goals; if you feel like directing (or filmmaking) is just a part of who you are...then you can't really fail. Like most of us, I would be happy for someone to call me up and offer me a deaql to make a movie. Someday, through persistence and an ever deepening understanding of my craft, perhaps that will happen. But if it doesn't, I will make movies anyway, because I love it.

We all have doubts. It's what we decide to do with them that make the difference.

GenJerDan
05-20-2005, 01:46 PM
Do it from the heart, even if you think you'll have no audience.

Remember, with 6+ billion people in the world, finding someone else who likes what you do is not impossible.

Dan

evinsky
05-20-2005, 02:00 PM
Chances are at this point nothing about your script is that special. Rober Rodriguez has a great line about this. "Every filmaker has about 30 bad films in him, it's better to get them out as soon as possible." So don't worry about your script being the next "El Mariachi" just make it as cheaply and creatively as you can. Then make another, and another. At a certain point you will start to know what's good and what's bad about your woork and be able to fix it. So just keep shooting.

Walter_Graff
05-21-2005, 01:30 PM
Don't give up your day job. Odds are slim to non that your ability will actually earn you a living. Don't stop dreaming, just don't stop living either.

J.R. Hudson
05-21-2005, 01:49 PM
Everyone is on par.

The key is to MAKE FILMS EVERY CHANCE YOU GET.

Write, Produce, Direct and Edit them.

Become skillled at your craft. Sitting around and daydreaming about it will get you no where. You must start now honing the skills.

jpbankesmercer
05-21-2005, 01:50 PM
Out of every independent film director out there, What makes me different? Why is my script worth watching? Should I just put this behind me and go on with my working ?

Only you can answer those questions.

This industry is built on rejection. The only advice I can give isÖDonít get disheartened and believe in yourself. If you have something to say Iím sure it will find its way out one way or another.
Good hunting.
J.P.

jpbankesmercer
05-21-2005, 01:55 PM
"Every filmaker has about 30 bad films in him, it's better to get them out as soon as possible."

:grin:

I needed that...phew!



2) You will measure your own success. If, like most of the people here, you enjoy shooting, writing, editing, etc because it's a way to express yourself;
perhaps that will happen. But if it doesn't, I will make movies anyway, because I love it.
We all have doubts. It's what we decide to do with them that make the difference.

It's good to know that others think some of those crazy ideas ive been having.
Maybe I'm not so crazy after all! :shocked: :undecided :happy:

Rosestar
05-21-2005, 01:56 PM
There is one way to find out. Do what Stanley Kubrick suggested, "Get a camera and some film and make a movie about anything at all".

Find a community college that offers a video production class and take it. Find one that lets you make a film. You get access to equipment for the price of tuition. Just don't believe everything that they say. If at the end of the class you still dig it. Go for it. Just take Walters advice, don't quit your day job.

If you can't find a CC to do it, check with your local cable system about community access procedures.

Mythfit
05-22-2005, 05:56 PM
Should I just put this behind me and go on with my working life?

Yes you should.

And if someone else telling you to stop is enough to stop you then Iím right. But if you ignore what everyone else says about the impossibility of your goals, if you burn with a desire to make films that overcomes the nay sayers, the doubters and all the others that gave up their own dreams for a more Ďpracticalí lifestyle, then go for it.

BTW, if your going to do it, be sure to surround yourself with other people who are supportive of your dreams, the people who tell you it cant be done are the people you should avoid like the plague.

Jim Brennan
05-22-2005, 09:37 PM
Yes you should.

And if someone else telling you to stop is enough to stop you then Iím right. But if you ignore what everyone else says about the impossibility of your goals, if you burn with a desire to make films that overcomes the nay sayers, the doubters and all the others that gave up their own dreams for a more Ďpracticalí lifestyle, then go for it.
.


That's the key.

SPZ
08-29-2005, 02:18 AM
This thread has been inspirational. I suggest a sticky to remind us what we are here to accomplish after all. Let's make movies!

mmm
08-29-2005, 02:47 AM
What makes me different? Why is my script worth watching? Should I just put this behind me and go on with my working life? Does anybody feel the same way?



My two pence (cents for you USA folk):

Firstly, nobody watches a script, but is you script worth making into a film? Well it is if:

1) You want to make it to learn from or for fun or because you know it will please a particular select audience. However, films like this are charities. You'll probably have to fund them yourself, so I would say keep working and make films as a hobby. Nothing wrong with that.

2) Your film is going to make money. If the films you want to make aren't going to make money, I would just take the advice of point 1. IMO this is a major, major problem with filmmaking in the UK, where people think that they can spend a million pounds making an art film with no potential audience and no chance of revenue.

I know the feeling you describe, however I look at it as I am simply in competition with a lot of other filmmakers and so I have to ensure my films have enough appeal to gain an audience. So far I have had it easy, only making "charity" films (ie short films) which can always find a festival audience and don't need to make back any money.

However, I am now planning a feature and am well aware that for the first time, some serious money is going to be on the line from investors (and myself). I am worried, but also excited. I am not risking everything, only money that the investors and I can afford to loose. If I fail, it will just be a hell of a lot harder getting funding for my next film.

The only thing that concerns me is that if you are questioning yourself and are unsure already, it may be hard for you to stay dedicated to filmmaking.

Like I said, just my opinion, its up to you!

Jeremy Ordan
08-29-2005, 01:48 PM
This is actually a great thread. I think I have something to add, but I am going to try to keep it as concise as possible.

This past weekend we shot an interview section for a documentary that we are working on where we had people travel and fly into Charlotte, NC for them to present a viewpoint on their image of America. We had a lot of people to film, so it was a pretty trying day. One of the people actually was there in between a couple of noshows and we ended up sitting outside of the theatre talking with one another for about twenty minutes. The reason this guy came down for this project was really to network, just meet people and things like that. He has a couple of script ideas and movie ideas that he wants to make and wanted to pitch them to us to see if we could help him make his projects. We are obviously not of the size to entertain additional projects right now, so after giving him some referrals and of course offering him to email me any ideas, I asked him why he wasn't just going to make them himself.

One of the great benefits you have of being a member of this community is the ability to network with other people and surf one of the largest knowledge bases available regarding filmmaking. If you believe in yourself and want to just get the experience then it is something that you need to cultivate. Get a camera, just anything you can get really really cheap, and just start to shoot. As you continue to gain experience you will want bigger and better equipement (lights, sound, camera, accessories, software, i could go and on...

The best way to learn anything except for surgery is to go out and do it...

JuX
08-30-2005, 10:33 AM
I am 24 yrs. old and I have this edge to become a director. I don't know how I can explain it but I see each shot in my head whenever I close my eyes. I have this thing where I know if I work hard and put time into directing films I can do it. Should I just put this behind me and go on with my working life?


You don't have an "edge". The only "edge" to becoming a filmmaker (with the exception of a bottomless bank account) is "drive". If you can get out there and do whatever it takes to make your movie through all the obstacles of life ie. Money, family, work, etc... and let none of that get you down and at the end of the day you still feel like picking up your camera or sitting down at your computer to finish that script you've been wanting to do, then and only THEN you are closer to becoming a filmmaker than someone who only dreams about being one or talks about being one or even complains about wanting to be one but cannot find the time to make any attempt at being one.

It's Tough Love Partner...

surf
08-30-2005, 11:31 AM
I made one of my best, when I felt worst. I won a festival with that film.

rsbush
08-31-2005, 05:06 AM
The only "edge" to becoming a filmmaker (with the exception of a bottomless bank account) is "drive"....

Well said. Show me a fanatic and I'll show you a success.