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Postmaster
09-26-2011, 07:08 AM
Update for my picture profile recommendations

http://frankglencairn.wordpress.com/2011/08/17/new-glencolor-picture-profiles-for-the-sony-fs100/

Frank

speedracerlo
09-26-2011, 11:12 AM
Thanks Frank, I've been using your recommendations since the last profile
Can you tell me how you're getting to the settings you're using? What do you look for?

Postmaster
09-26-2011, 01:15 PM
1. Gazing at waveform monitors, charts and vector-scopes till my eyes pop out.
2. Do some real world tests under different lighting conditions and scenarios
3. Grading in different applications and see how far I can (and need to) push it.

What Iīm looking for? The perfect skin tones (for my taste) and workflow.


Frank

Neex
09-26-2011, 02:50 PM
Do you feel that these settings are giving you full dynamic range? Do you pull down the super whites in post?Also, do you lean towards under exposure to protect highlights, or over exposure to boost your shadows or subject? Do you find yourself returning to any kind of curve consistently while grading?

Postmaster
09-26-2011, 11:49 PM
What I do is:

1. Dialing in my DOF for the scene.
2. Correct the highlights with an variable ND, till the 100% zebras go away (or use a WFM).
3. bring the black levels to zero via the “Black Level” PP setting.

Number 3 is a bit awkward and time consuming, but the only way, to use as much of the 8 bit room as possible.
Believe me, itīs worth the fiddling in the menu. (for fast jobs or run&gun, I use one of the other presets, depending on if they go trough post or not.)

My further workflow goes like this:

Convert everything to Cineform (Film)
Drop them all in Premiere and start editing.
When Iīm happy with the edit, I open first light and do the
primary CC in FirstLight – set “Linear” on in and output – maybe also apply a look (LUT) there.
If something special is needed, I also use Magic Bullet or Mojo in Premiere on top of everything.

In most of my productions, I have nothing over 80 IRE (with some exceptions of course) aside form little reflections on water or chrome.
Skin tones live in 50 IRE neighborhood. So itīs mostly the lower two thirds of range (with some spikes) where I end up in post.

Frank

eheath
09-27-2011, 01:33 AM
stoked to set these up! i only have like 3 of my PPs in use so itll be fun to play around with this.

eheath
09-28-2011, 11:40 PM
3. bring the black levels to zero via the “Black Level” PP setting.

what exactly do you do to do this?

Budgieboots
10-01-2011, 10:37 PM
Hi Glen, just wondering, your profile pictures aren't meant for doing any additional colour correction correct in post right? They are a "look" you basically use as you get it right?

nomad-3
10-02-2011, 12:25 AM
Well, with any camera delivering only 8 bit and 4:2:0 you should do quite limited color correction in post. Nothing extreme or you'll blow your images. This is not S-log or RAW.

I really appreciate what Glen has done, but if you need different looks, dial them into the cam by yourself!

eheath
10-02-2011, 01:25 AM
Heres a quick screen grab i just took from a shoot on friday, this is with the posted PP and a tamron 17-50
http://media.nscdn.com/uploads/images/17/00/35/42/47/354247.png

cuervo
10-03-2011, 10:36 AM
what exactly do you do to do this?
FYI.....
I use a SmallHD DP6 monitor with my acquisition. This monitor does not have a WFM, however, it has a false color mode that will display IRE<3 as dark blue. Using this feature, it works very well to adjust black level until the shadows are where you want them.

Postmaster
10-03-2011, 02:56 PM
Yeah, you ether need waveform or false color to do this.

I look at my waveform, dial in my highlights, than I go to the PP menu and adjust my blacks just a hair over zero.

Frank

eheath
10-03-2011, 03:12 PM
Ah okay, I understand now.

gianx80
01-19-2012, 10:40 AM
I'm using glencolor1 (version 1.2) for indoor shooting. Using as lightsource a normal light bulb (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incandescent_light_bulb) I get a yellowish image: this didn't happen with older versions of glencolor.

Does this happen also to you? Any suggestions?

Postmaster
01-19-2012, 03:03 PM
You have to do a proper white balance whenever your light situation changes.
Check if our WB is off. If your problem is still there, please post some images and the profile and settings you used, so I can help you.

Frank

Kraut69
01-19-2012, 05:43 PM
Frank, what is the benefit of converting to Cineform (Film) before plugging the clips into Premiere?

Postmaster
01-20-2012, 12:43 AM
Though Premiere can play AVCHD fine, it gets a bit "sticky" when you add a lot of grading and effects, even on a macho Cuda computer.
Converting them to Cineform makes things a bit more fluid and I love to grade with FirstLight - but thatīs just a personal thing.

Also if you plan a lot of "round trips" in post, Cineform is more robust than AVCHD.

Frank

gianx80
01-20-2012, 02:10 AM
You have to do a proper white balance whenever your light situation changes.
Check if our WB is off. If your problem is still there, please post some images and the profile and settings you used, so I can help you.

Frank

Yes, I did white balance 3 or 4 times, nothing changed. I used this picture profile:


GlenColor1:

Black Level: (basic) 0, (controlled = variable)
Gamma: Standard
Black Gamma: Range = High / Level = +7
Knee: Point = 102.5% / Slope = -1
Color Mode: Type = ITU709 / Level =8
Color Level: -4
Color Phase: -4
Color Depth: all 0
WB Shift = LB -3, cc -5
Detail = Level = -3 / Manual Set = on
V/H Ballance +2
BW Ballance Type3
Limit 7
Chrispening 0
Highlight Detail 0



This an image from a test shoot. It's not a well done clip (I just turned on the camera, put it on the table, I did white balance and I adjusted gain, stop), however it's all too yellowish (my sweater is not as orange as it should be, the wardrobe is not as brown as it should be etc).

46509

P.S.


Check if our WB is off

What do you mean? Auto WB?

Postmaster
01-20-2012, 03:05 AM
Are you sure you did a proper WB procedure? The wall and the door should be white (unless they are yellowish in real life) after that, no mater what profile you use.

1 Set the AUTO/MANUAL switch to MANUAL.
2 Press the WHT BAL button
3 Set the white balance memory switch to A or B
4 Capture a white subject, such as white paper, full-screen in the same lighting
condition as the one in which the subject is.
5 Press the (one push) little button on the left side of the A/B/Preset switch.
The adjusted value is stored in A or
B. The stored color temperature appears for about 3 seconds.

gianx80
01-20-2012, 03:45 AM
Are you sure you did a proper WB procedure? The wall and the door should be white (unless they are yellowish in real life) after that, no mater what profile you use.

1 Set the AUTO/MANUAL switch to MANUAL.
2 Press the WHT BAL button
3 Set the white balance memory switch to A or B
4 Capture a white subject, such as white paper, full-screen in the same lighting
condition as the one in which the subject is.
5 Press the (one push) little button on the left side of the A/B/Preset switch.
The adjusted value is stored in A or
B. The stored color temperature appears for about 3 seconds.

I've aleady done these steps yesterday. However I've done all the procedure again and the problem seems fixed. Thanks.

robfilms
01-20-2012, 06:11 AM
Are you sure you did a proper WB procedure? The wall and the door should be white (unless they are yellowish in real life) after that, no mater what profile you use.

1 Set the AUTO/MANUAL switch to MANUAL.
2 Press the WHT BAL button
3 Set the white balance memory switch to A or B
4 Capture a white subject, such as white paper, full-screen in the same lighting
condition as the one in which the subject is.
5 Press the (one push) little button on the left side of the A/B/Preset switch.
The adjusted value is stored in A or
B. The stored color temperature appears for about 3 seconds.

frank-

i think it is great that the fs100 displays the color temp.

i find it very handy.

is there no way to dial in a preferred color temperature?

thanks in advance.

be well

rob
smalltalk productions

Postmaster
01-20-2012, 07:13 AM
Of course you can. In the menus and with the buttons on the outside.
Set it to Preset, hit the WB button and than the little button left of the A/B/Preset switch.
Than the color temperatur comes up in the display. With that little wheel (that you use for shutterspeed) you can now
dial in the temperature.

The manual explains it all ;-)

Frank

robfilms
01-20-2012, 07:42 AM
Of course you can. In the menus and with the buttons on the outside.
Set it to Preset, hit the WB button and than the little button left of the A/B/Preset switch.
Than the color temperatur comes up in the display. With that little wheel (that you use for shutterspeed) you can now
dial in the temperature.

The manual explains it all ;-)

Frank

frank-

thanks for the quick "how-to".

i did read the manual, and even watched the doug jensen/vortex dvd.

i must of missed "setting the temp" because all my other white balances have been accurate.

in your work with the fs100, how do you use "setting the temp" rather than a simple manual white balance?

i'm obviously still learning/test shooting my fs100!

be well

rob
smalltalk productions

Postmaster
01-20-2012, 09:57 AM
I set my temperature mostly manual, till I got the skin tones where I want them.
If I shoot something without skin, I use the normal WB with a greycard.

gianx80
01-20-2012, 10:47 AM
Ok, ok, I did some more testing and I think that my shoots are still yellowish (less then before, however).

This is without any profile applied:

46528

And this one is with GlenColor1:

46529

In the first one, brown is as brown as it should be, in the second one brown it's so yellowish. And yes, I did a proper WB.

Postmaster
01-20-2012, 11:42 AM
Now I see what you mean.
My profiles are optimized for skin tones - since the FS100 is always a bit on the red side (no pun intended) and the red channel is prone to clip first, I dialed it back.

gianx80
01-21-2012, 01:50 AM
Now I see what you mean.
My profiles are optimized for skin tones - since the FS100 is always a bit on the red side (no pun intended) and the red channel is prone to clip first, I dialed it back.

So I HAVE to color correct my shoots in order to solve the "yellowish tint problem", right? And for a run and gun work (I mean shoot and deliver without any post) which profile should I use?

sowattmusic
01-21-2012, 08:27 AM
REGARDING Manual Color temperature

I also usually dial my WB manually. But I noticed that with the FS 100 and with all Sony cameras in general, it is nice to dial a slightly cooler WB that it would normally be.
You can for example do a preset WB with a white card, look at the temperature in K and then dial manually a White balance which is between 100 and 200 K less.
For reason it gives me even more latitude while shooting (Clipping less) and when grading I can make the image warmer if i want.
CLEARLY, my rule of thumb> Its much easier to grade a shot that is too cool than one that is too warm. Making cooler a warm shot is not easy. It probably has to do with the Component (YUV) encoding of the image.

Postmaster
01-21-2012, 08:30 AM
So I HAVE to color correct my shoots in order to solve the "yellowish tint problem", right? And for a run and gun work (I mean shoot and deliver without any post) which profile should I use?

To be safe? Non (profile zero) ore AbelCine Range, but I would prefer no profile at all.

Frank

gianx80
01-22-2012, 02:48 AM
To be safe? Non (profile zero) ore AbelCine Range, but I would prefer no profile at all.

Frank

Thanks for your advices :)