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ROCKMORE
10-28-2010, 08:08 PM
I have an i7 with CS5, but when that computer is busy I have to work on my quad as well with CS4.
This week I had to edit a project with 80 Gb of H-264 1080 25p footage that had to be edited on the Quad which isn't fast enough and can't handle that size workload. I don't like transcoded footage for the final grade and always use the original H-264 camera files for final grading and export. I decided to transcode all the files to work offline, using Streamclip to batch convert each of the 10 folders to 1280x720 with setting Apple Motion JPEG A at 50% quality. This gave me a good looking image to work with offline and the files were reduced to 50% of the data from my original camera files. My 80GB project became a 40GB set of duplicate work files instead of growing X4 in file size when transcoding.
Importing the 1280x720 files to the CS4 full 1080 25fps timeline, I scaled up the 720p to frame size and it edited without rendering faster than anything I've ever done. Very light timeline.
Before I exported the files I right clicked and made each folder in the CS4 project "offline", then linked each folder to the folder of original camera files containing a set of full rez files with the identical names, in this case shot numbers .mov.
This workflow works for me because the transcoding reduces the converted files by half and the M-JPEG files are easy for the slower PC with CS4 to read.
This should allow me to edit in the field offline with even a small compact laptop, but still be able to convert back to my original files for grading and export.
For people who don't have the cash for an i7 and CS5 this is an alternate method to work on a slower system while retaining the best export quality for delivery.

life4eva
10-29-2010, 03:49 PM
I have an i7 with CS5, but when that computer is busy I have to work on my quad as well with CS4.
This week I had to edit a project with 80 Gb of H-264 1080 25p footage that had to be edited on the Quad which isn't fast enough and can't handle that size workload. I don't like transcoded footage for the final grade and always use the original H-264 camera files for final grading and export. I decided to transcode all the files to work offline, using Streamclip to batch convert each of the 10 folders to 1280x720 with setting Apple Motion JPEG A at 50% quality. This gave me a good looking image to work with offline and the files were reduced to 50% of the data from my original camera files. My 80GB project became a 40GB set of duplicate work files instead of growing X4 in file size when transcoding.
Importing the 1280x720 files to the CS4 full 1080 25fps timeline, I scaled up the 720p to frame size and it edited without rendering faster than anything I've ever done. Very light timeline.
Before I exported the files I right clicked and made each folder in the CS4 project "offline", then linked each folder to the folder of original camera files containing a set of full rez files with the identical names, in this case shot numbers .mov.
This workflow works for me because the transcoding reduces the converted files by half and the M-JPEG files are easy for the slower PC with CS4 to read.
This should allow me to edit in the field offline with even a small compact laptop, but still be able to convert back to my original files for grading and export.
For people who don't have the cash for an i7 and CS5 this is an alternate method to work on a slower system while retaining the best export quality for delivery.


You and I know you are in the minority..... H-264 no matter which way you look at it is NOT an editing codec. If you do not like transcoding your material that's one thing, but I would rather do that then work with the native files which ultimately will bring problems.

ROCKMORE
10-29-2010, 07:24 PM
You and I know you are in the minority..... H-264 no matter which way you look at it is NOT an editing codec. If you do not like transcoding your material that's one thing, but I would rather do that then work with the native files which ultimately will bring problems.


This method is to edit with a codec other than H-264 for offline, but use the original files for grading and final export.

Transcoding footage for offline is a benefit when it speeds up editing, but only adds an additional set of files 50% the size of the original H-264

Transcoding full HD files for online to replace the original H-264 adds an additional set file size 4 to 5 times the size, while degrading the quality, and introducing new problems such as gamma shift.

Here are a few quotes from other users on the subject of full HD transcoding/ I don't know if they represent the majority or the minority.

Quote/
"Thats normal, welcome to apple gamma conversion hell.
Not much you can do but correct the gamma in post."

"LOL.. its about 4-5 times larger than the h.264 from the cam. Welcome to final cut world...
(hint: check out premiere with a proper nvidia card.. you can cut the stuff natively.."

"LOL, just noticed the date on the OP is from June. Oh well, still relevant, as the gamma shift issue can be a nightmare."