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View Full Version : Space available on Dvd Movies you buy?



Staven
12-14-2004, 10:28 PM
I should know this, but on your normal Dvd you'd purchase from say Rogers or Blockbuster, take say I,Robot that's just come out. What size is the Dvd it comes on? 4.7 or bigger like 8.2...

For the life of me I can't fit shit onto a 4.7 Dvd using compressor. I have a feature thats 90 minutes. the Video track takes up 3.3 gb, the audio 1.1, add the menus my Dvd is full. I really wanted to put in some extras but for the life of me I can't fit anything else.

I know the answer is gonna be that they use way better compression programs, but how can real Dvd's fit so much onto a Dvd and have it look prestine, and I am stuck with just the movie.(I hate Dvd's without extras!)

Alexa
12-14-2004, 10:55 PM
Can't answer the hollywood thing though..

what is your bitrate? Can you lower it? for the feature.

What kind of auidio compression

You could also skimp a bit on the menu video bit rate...

krestofre
12-15-2004, 08:55 AM
Almost all Hollywood DVDs that you buy are dual layer which means they hold 8.somthing GB worth of data.

You should be able to fit 90 min on to a 4.7 disc though. I would reiterate Pooh's question about the audio compression. If you're using PCM, then you sould look into ways to convert it so AC3 to save a ton of space.

Also you can google for a program called PowerBit which is an MPEG-2 bitrate calculator. You give it the length of the video, the size of the DVD, and it will give you the bitrate that you need to encode at to make everything fit.

Hope that helps.

Chris

krestofre
12-15-2004, 08:57 AM
Let me add that what I've done to get the whole "extras on the DVD" feature in the past is release it as a "2-disc Special Edition" and put the movie on one disc and the extras on another disc. You can even buy the DVD cases that hold 2 DVDs and look fancy. ;D

Chris

kai
12-16-2004, 07:52 AM
Do as these guys said and AC3 your audio tracks, and tweak your video bitrate. you can fit 90 mins no prob...

kai
12-16-2004, 07:53 AM
PS: Or do like the bigboys and get yourself a dual layer burner (they're out now and suprisingly not that much), and just author a dual layer disc from Studio Pro.

krestofre
12-16-2004, 10:59 AM
Dual-layer burners are out. To my knowledge there are still no dual-layer blank discs available for them though. :'(

Chris

kai
12-16-2004, 12:56 PM
These are +R, so I'm guessing it would depend on what drive you had if they're compatible or not.

http://shop.store.yahoo.com/cdrdvdrmedia/dl-dvd-r-dual-layer-ritek-ridata.html

http://shop.store.yahoo.com/cdrdvdrmedia/dl-dvd-r-dual-double-layer-verbatim2.html

krestofre
12-16-2004, 02:20 PM
Wow! I'm happy to be wrong on this one. I didn't think the media had made it to stores yet. Now where did I put that credit card? :)

Chris

Staven
12-19-2004, 02:59 PM
Hey guys. Thanks for the ideas on how to fit it all on one DVD.

I've been playing around with it a fair amount, and am getting decent results. Looks like I can probably get it all on a DVD.(though recently DVDSP2 has been acting up, and compressor all of a sudden won't let me submit my exports, but they may one day be another post).

I am though not sure of what you mean by AC3. Is that short for something? It's probably a simple answer that'll make me look stupid, but I got no idea what it is.

When DVDSP2 was working I made some test dvd's at different bitrates. For the life of me, I can see no difference between a high quality 2-pass bitrate of 6-8.5 and a 1-pass with a bitrate of 3.5-4.5 . They look the exact same of the T.V.'s I've checked them out on. Maybe on a big screen you'd notice a difference, but otherwise low bitrates work great.

thanks again for the help, and a description of AC3 would help me out.

krestofre
12-19-2004, 05:30 PM
AC3 is dolby digital encoding. Commonly it's either 5.1 channel surround sound or 2 channel stereo sound. It's a lossy compression, but a good one and will result in smaller audio files than PCM (which is exactly the same as uncompressed WAV files on your computer). AC3 is part of the DVD spec, so every DVD player ever made can read AC3 audio.

You'll need software that can encode to dolby digital, which can be pretty expensive. Personally I use Soft Encode to create AC3 files, but that software is no longer on the market. I think that Vegas Video has AC3 encoding capabilities, but I might be mistaken. TMPEG makes a DVD bundle that will encode to AC3, but you're very limited in the control you have and it will only be 2 channel stereo, but I think it's under $100.

Hope that helps!

Chris

Alexa
12-19-2004, 05:42 PM
DVDSP2 has been acting up, and compressor all of a sudden won't let me submit my exports, but they may one day be another post).

is this still the problem? Compressor is my most unfavorite app. That happened to me once and it was because my disk was almost full. There seem to be lots of reasons. its is also the ONE appl. that my big machine hates. G5 fan noise "phenomena."


I am though not sure of what you mean by AC3. *Is that short for something? *It's probably a simple answer that'll make me look stupid, but I got no idea what it is.

"A.Pack comes with DVDSP, if I remember correctly. not a stupid question. I learned how to use it on kenstone.net. Makes a tremendous difference in space. PCM is space hog.


When DVDSP2 was working I made some test dvd's at different bitrates. *For the life of me, I can see no difference between a high quality 2-pass bitrate of 6-8.5 and a 1-pass with a bitrate of 3.5-4.5 . *They look the exact same of the T.V.'s I've checked them out on. *Maybe on a big screen you'd notice a difference, but otherwise low bitrates work great.

if that is true and you are satisfied it makes no diff., then go with the lower bitrate. It might depend on the video. If it is very little motion video, the bitrate may not make a diff.

bodaphoto
12-23-2004, 08:26 PM
Here is the bit-rate calculator.
http://www.videohelp.com/calc.htm

If the video is over 15 min use VBR and make sure you GOP is 15.