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tucker07205
12-01-2004, 07:45 AM
What does a production team consist of?....such as DP, Grip etc. *I need to know the proper names and duties.......Thanks!

Jim Brennan
12-01-2004, 09:02 AM
There can bea lot of overlap in these titles, depending on who you are working with, but here's what I've experienced. But mileage varies.

Director: Boss on the set. Directs the actors, sets up the blocking, decides (with the DP) things like camera angles, and lighting. He interprets the story visually.

DP: (Also called cinematographer) Sets up the look of the film by the way it is lit. Also is often the camera operator. Has a good knowledge of the camera and how to work it to get what the director is looking for.

Gaffer: head electrician. rigs up the lights

Key Grip: Head grip

Best Boy: Next in line to the key grip

Grip: They move shit. It's more complicated than that, but basically they do the physical part of the job. That doesn't mean it doesn't require skill and experience. Some of the grip's jobs are specific (a dolly grip moves the dolly, etc)

Boom operator: Ummm, operates the boom

Sound mixer/recordist: monitors the audio and adjusts things as necessary, leaving the boom operator free to do his job.

what am I forgetting?

BLUESPIDER
12-01-2004, 10:29 AM
Producer- Can also be the boss on set. Helps organize,hires, actually it all depends.

executive producer- In my eyes don't really do shit!

craft service- food baby, or could be someones mom cooking.

For a small indi flick you don't really need a whole lot. All depends on what it is youre doing.

BLUESPIDER
12-01-2004, 10:30 AM
oh I forgot the post production team.

editors, sound dudes, graphics if you need them.

tucker07205
12-01-2004, 10:54 AM
yeah I can see how some of these can overlap.....I pretty much get the idea of a production team.....I have everyone.......I just wanted to know the proper job titles......thanks guys!

TC
12-01-2004, 11:04 AM
production manager- needs a good sturdy head on shoulders to help out the producer.

lighting director- somewhere in between the DP and the lead gaffer.

production designer- builds shit.

runner- designated to go get the stuff that everyone else is too busy to get.

production assistant (pa)- does anything and everything you tell them, many times they are an aspiring director.

1st AD- If your film were the church, and the Director were god, the 1st AD would be the high priest. Recieving the message from god and delivering it to the people.

Jim Brennan
12-01-2004, 11:42 AM
executive producer- In my eyes don't really do shit!

.
My wife would disagree. That was her title last go around (she also did continuity and script sup) and she bought me the dang camera.

Jim Brennan
12-01-2004, 11:43 AM
1st AD- If your film were the church, and the Director were god, the 1st AD would be the high priest. Recieving the message from god and delivering it to the people.
Cool analogy TC. It gives me delusions of adequacy

TC
12-01-2004, 11:46 AM
;D

Me too. I'm first AD on a shoot next month, and I had to make myself feel important.

It was actually the director who made that analogy.

Woodson
12-01-2004, 01:38 PM
Investors put movie in films, not producers. Investors are sometimes given an "executive producer" credit but not a producer credit. Sometimes low budget filmmakers are putting in most of the money themselves then they should give themselves a "executive producer" credit. A producer is a business manager, the one who pulls it all together.

J_Barnes
12-01-2004, 02:03 PM
Traditionally, an executive producer is an "executive" level producer, meaning he is in a supervisory role over the entire project, but does not run the day to day operations. *This can mean he is the person who fronts the money or he can be the person who actually puts the production together.

In the majority of features, the executive producer is the person who assembles "the package"...meaning he secures the script, attaches the producer, director, major stars, secures financing and makes the deal with the studios both for both local and worldwide distribution.

As there is no firm definition of the roles, an Executive Producer credit can easily mean very little, but it can also mean a lot of work to actually get the project started. *Anyone who's ever worked in a project as large as a feature would understand the importance of actually getting the project off the ground.

As stated above, in Indie films...it's far more likely that an "executive producer" credit is a vanity credit given to a fundraiser. In my experience, an executive producer credit in a hollywood production tends to carry far more weight and responsability.

taubkin
12-02-2004, 03:51 AM
Besides, it's the executive producer who decides how to spend the money he raised, so if he sais there's no helicoter shot, there isn't no matter how much the director cries. From this point of view, is a creative role that has a lot of influence on the final piece.

J_Barnes
12-02-2004, 12:12 PM
Or a price role that has a lot of influence on the final creativity! :P

taubkin
12-03-2004, 04:07 AM
:D

HorseFilms
12-03-2004, 10:21 AM
In the case of my productions, I pretty much do everything.

You haven't lived until you've been the boom operator and the actor in the same shot. ;)

Jim Brennan
12-03-2004, 10:49 AM
were you playing a boom operator in the movie?

BLUESPIDER
12-03-2004, 11:36 AM
You haven't lived until you've been the boom operator and the actor in the same shot.

dats skills! or you played a boom operator.

HorseFilms
12-03-2004, 12:12 PM
No, I wasn't playing a boom operator. It was a closeup, so that wasn't a big thing. *I once held a reflector for myself, too. Again, in closeup. I try to stay behind the camera as much as possible, but I like to show up every once in awhile.

I need to get some friends who are willing to help me out with a few things.

SadMax
12-09-2004, 12:58 PM
*In my experience, an executive producer credit in a hollywood production tends to carry far more weight and responsability.

I guess mileage can vary. There's been rumblings lately about the rampant abuse of the 'producer' and 'executive producer' credits and perks, and there are people in the Producers' Guild who want to have sanctions on companies that use those titles to cover a sinecure.

J_Barnes
12-09-2004, 01:35 PM
don't take it out of context. The full thrust of what I was saying is:

"As stated above, in Indie films...it's far more likely that an "executive producer" credit is a vanity credit given to a fundraiser. In my experience, an executive producer credit in a hollywood production tends to carry far more weight and responsability. "

I'm comparing one to the other. In indie films, often times an executive producer is just someone who's fronted money. Compared to that, an executive producer in hollywood typically carries more weight and responsability then a similar role in an indie.

For one thing, they're rarely playing with their own money.

Erik Olson
12-12-2004, 03:58 PM
The Executive Producer is often involved in many topline decisions – setting mandates for how the production runs through folks like the Director, Line Producer (head accountant), Producer, Casting Director, Art Director et-cetera. *They control the entire show – from greenlighting and oversight of the budget for their investors to “suggesting” the inclusion of their daughter in a key acting role.

Often, the Line Producer works with the Producer, Director and Unit Production Manager (UPM) to design the shooting schedule around the available budget to maximize locations and day-of-days decisions. *The LP and Producer may both secure production insurance and rental and purchase agreements for the show through the UPM(s) and Production Coordinator.

Ultimately, the Producer is responsible for keeping things on schedule, budgets on target and people from getting killed or sued through her diligent efforts. *No aspect of the show is beyond the capacity and responsibility of the Producer – through all phases of production.

On a real show, there are key players like the UPM and Production Coordinator who keep things running nicely by preparing each shooting day through all aspects with department heads and the above-the-line creative staffers, and keeping the below-the-line crew organized and on-time. *The UPM is often buried in the office on shooting days from pre-dawn until well after the physical crew has wrapped for the day. *It isn’t uncommon for this person to show up mid-morning to make sure things haven’t spun wildly out of control. *Usually, they’ll get a phone call from the Coordinator if there is an issue or delay of any kind.

Having locations scouted, permitted, compensated and released can fall to the UPM and/or Coordinator (in concert with a below-the-line Location Scout) depending on the size of the show. *UPMs and Coordinators work across every department to make sure locations are ready, sets are built, props are placed, purchases made, transportation organized, breaks and meals honored and fed – all within the scope of the pre-determined budget.

The Director serves as an interface between the money people, the vision people and the talent. *Her role is often the most visible – but a Producer plays a much larger overall role in what you see on the screen. *Few directors can shoot coverage only, decide to flash an entire picture, shoot exclusively in reversal film or have everyone wear giant fruit hats without the Producer and EP getting involved. *

The Director of Photography is a hired gun – usually sought out for their shooting style and working dynamic. *The DP (not DOP please) works with the camera department to implement the pre-determined style of the show. *Every camera-related decision, and sometimes the Camera Operator position, is fulfilled by the DP. *You’ll also find 24-Frame and Continuity keeping each shot true from take to take.

Department heads all report to the Director, UPM and Producer to fulfill their respective duties. *The Art Director keeps the carpenters, painters, properties and decorators in-check and creatively aligned; the Head Electrician (Gaffer) interfaces with the Key Grip and the DP to light and control each set-up; Transportation Coordinators get the crew and vehicles from one place to another and sometimes manage security – Teamsters like to carry weapons A LOT!

The physical production audio department consists of a Production Mixer, Boom Operator or 2nd Audio and Cable Man or Cable Utility or 3rd Audio position to sling cables and help log.

I’ll let someone else cover post-production positions and anything I’ve missed – I’ve always worked the physical production side. *Have I left anything out?

Hmm… needless to say, we often fill many of these roles ourselves on our own shorts and relentless tests. *Bringing the other positions to the table requires patience for collaboration and compromise, but often yields stunning results. *After working independently in a crew of free – I mean, three - and in large, unionized productions alike, I tend to prefer the creative spark of smaller, more organic situations.

What is your experience?