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View Full Version : need suggestion for micro HD cam



emailists
12-19-2009, 02:45 PM
Hi All,

I already own an HVX200 and planning on buying a Scarlet when it comes out, but I am looking for one of those tiny card based consumer HD cameras to take on vacation, or just carry with me for when one of those amazing New York street scenes pops up before me. I was actually on that new Oasis of the Seas (largest cruise ship launched) and probably could have done some amazing time lapse stuff.

Image quality/manual control? is key and ability to play nice with OSX to transcode is needed. An external mic input would be nice but probably not available.

Has anyone done the research on these? I am thinking of something built as motion camera first, not a still with video added on.

Reflex Films
01-22-2010, 07:24 PM
gopro HD - i am getting some seriously nice footage out of this camera. And it shoots 60 fps - conformed to 25fps and you have 40 % slo mo!

Bigmagic
02-10-2010, 01:28 AM
I bought a Flip Ultra HD for my daughter for Christmas, she has shot some impressive footage. It doesn't have a card but has 8G internal storage and plugs right into a USB port with no cables. Codec is H.264 I believe.

Kellar42
02-10-2010, 06:29 AM
The Canon HF series does pretty impressive work and are quite small. A GH1 is pretty portable and gives more flexibility and great image quality.

I love the idea of Flips and GoPro's but I just can't love the image quality.

rambooc1
02-11-2010, 02:53 AM
The Canon HF series does pretty impressive work and are quite small. A GH1 is pretty portable and gives more flexibility and great image quality.

I love the idea of Flips and GoPro's but I just can't love the image quality.

Actually the image quality ain't that bad if you are using them as POVcams and just cutting clips into your main footage. As Relex said 720p at 60fps is the sweet mode and half the jello of all the other modes. My clients luv them and want more included. 170 degree wide angle is pretty unique.

R

xqzt
02-11-2010, 07:56 AM
I wish I could find one of those Panny SD9, 3ccd HD progressive model, that little thing was awesome, b4 they went all 3mos on us.

hazydave
04-01-2010, 11:44 AM
I wish I could find one of those Panny SD9, 3ccd HD progressive model, that little thing was awesome, b4 they went all 3mos on us.

I bought my daugher a used SD9 about a year ago. There are tradeoffs... the SD9 is absolutely horrible in low light... those 1/6" chips are just not that sensitive. The CCDs don't have the rolling shutter issue, but they do have other issues, and modern CMOS chips are lower noise. What I did like: tapeless is easy for a kid who already deals with still cameras on that basis. She's in a "Communications Academy" in High School, they do quite a bit with video. Unlike most consumer models, this also has manual settings and 24p. So yeah, it was a pretty nice camera, particulalry for $300 (not that much more than a Flip-HD, eh?).

You can still find these used, though more like $400-ish. I think I got a particularly good deal, but if you want one, they're to be had... check Amazon.com or eBay.

Before I "went tapeless" for my main camera, I bought a Sanyo Xacti FH1. This is very consumery, bare bones on the surface. It's $400, about twice the price of these "Flip" style cameras. But what you get it pretty crazy for the price. 1/2.5" single 8Mpixel CMOS sensor... this means, very good low-light performance (1 lux in "high sensitivity" mode)... comparable to my way, way more expensive Sony. The camera uses pixel binning, so you get the same basic color quality you'd see with a consumer 3-chipper. It does 1080/60p, 60i, native 30p, and 720/30p, but no independent control over bitrate. It has a relatively real f2.0 lens with 10:1 zoom, not those pinhole fixed-prime lenses you find the "Flip" cameras.

Of course, like most cheap models, no audio in/out, and in fact, other than USB port, HDMI port, SDHC slot, and a very few buttons, no controls of any kind other than on-screen. With that said, you also get full and indepent control of gain (as ISO setting) and exposure. Or full auto. Image stabilization is "digital" (eg, poor).

I got this to play with the tapeless process, and offload wear and tear on my Sony. But I've actually used it as a B camera here and there. Even on Blu-Ray, you'd be hard pressed to tell it from a $3000 camera of a few years back.