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View Full Version : Is Shutter-priority best video mode for GH1?



Bradley Kents
11-27-2009, 03:00 PM
Hello GH1ers!

Trying to sort through the many choices for shooting video.

I hope I'm not asking about something that's already been well covered, but I searched this forum for selecting the best mode for shooting video ... and found shutter-speed suggestions -- 1/60 for shooting in 720/60p and 1/120 for slo-mo in a 24p timeline (where it will be intercut with video from our other camera: a Panasonic 170 shooting in 720/24p).

So if we can agree on the above -- can we? -- does that mean that shutter speed is generally a deciding matter? Assuming so, should I should choose the VIDEO-M on the mode dial, then in the MENU settings, choose MOTION PICTURE>EXPOSURE MODE>S to shoot in a shutter-priority mode? Is this recommended for best results? Then maybe bump the ISO to 800 or 1600 in low light conditions?

Or are there other ways I should be thinking about this?

Interesting that if I choose the iA mode in low light conditions, the video is noticeably brighter. How is iA doing that -- cheating the shutter speed down? I guess that would be better than severe underexposure ...

Any suggestions or info would be much appreciated.

Thanks,
Bradley

Barry_Green
11-27-2009, 03:37 PM
Use Creative Movie Mode, and never ever ever leave it.

(okay, leave it if you want, but I never do)

Psynema
11-27-2009, 04:14 PM
Use Creative Movie Mode, and never ever ever leave it.

(okay, leave it if you want, but I never do)

I think he meant exposure mode, not the photo dial.

Cassius
11-28-2009, 01:01 AM
If you're determined to use auto exposure, that's the only effective way to do so in video mode. If the above is right on what you mean. I prefer to go all manual, especially because there are two exposure options (ISO and ND filters) that don't get factored in by the computer. I also assume the exposure would be prone to change while recording. So if you're only using the kit lens and want the camera to choose the lighting, go with shutter priority. Just be careful about bumping that little dial to the wrong frame rate, it's in a terrible spot on the camera.

AdrianF
11-28-2009, 01:07 AM
Like Barry said, you really want to use Creative Movie Mode and select M-manual, from the drop down menu. This will give you full control over your exposure settings.

Ozpeter
11-28-2009, 02:12 AM
The camera will change aperture quite noticeably in shutter priority mode if the scene illumination that it sees changes - just people or cars passing can trigger it, or a zoom or pan. It's not a smooth change, it's quite sudden, and you may wish to use full manual mode for full control.

Bradley Kents
11-28-2009, 07:52 AM
OK -- thanks for all the good feedback. One quick note: I don't really have any particular interest in using auto-exposure, I was just wondering why iA seems to keep things more open in low light than any settings I was able to come up with. I guessing it drops the shutter speed?

Anyway, now let's see if I can summarize the advice and then follow up with questions about ISO and ND filters.

I think the collective wisdom suggested that you'll get best results shooting video with a GH1 if you:
1. Select the Creative Movie Mode on the top mode dial (that's the little movie camera icon, plus an M). Set this and forget it -- don't wander from here.
2. Then hit MENU and bring up the MOTION PICTURE prefs. Select M for all manual.
3. Press-rotate the front dial to set your shutter speed to 1/60. Again, set-and-forget. Don't change it! (Seems like we're treating this like a video camera -- duh! makes sense!)
4. From here, you press-rotate the front dial to adjust your exposure (kind of noisy for video recording!).
5. This approach will work well in all but very low light conditions and very bright conditions.

So let's turn our attention to ISO and ND.

ISO
I suspect we can all agree that we want to use the lowest ISO possible. But as light levels drop, we can compensate by bumping the ISO up to 200, 400, 800 and 1600. The penalty here is added noise. (And, yeah, you want to add light, if possible.)

ND
Then let's step out into a very bright and sunny day. Unlike video cameras like our 170, the GH1 has no ND filters, so I was thinking of going with the Philip Bloom suggested Singh-Ray Vari-ND (sized for our largest lens, then add step-down rings for others). For bright conditions, this sounds like it would essentially become the new iris -- exposure would be largely set there.

Does all that sound like a good way of working for the best results to you? Feel free to pick on, correct or make further suggestions.

Again, many thanks for taking time to share.
Bradley

Cassius
11-28-2009, 09:30 AM
It does, and I wish I followed the suggestion of the good, large ND with step down rings earlier.

Bradley Kents
11-28-2009, 09:24 PM
Continued to test the GH1 today and read the manual and since we're addressing all this about video settings, I would like to add to questions about choices in the MOTION PICTURE settings menu:
1. METERING MODE (p119 in the manual): I understand the nature of the three choices -- MULTIPLE, CENTER-WEIGHTED and SPOT -- but I wonder if anyone thinks one tends to be better for video? And is this choice, by the way, essentially the data/feed that builds the histogram?
2. I.EXPOSURE (p121): I don't think this even comes into play if we're shooting all manual, does it?

Also pulled out our GF1 and LX3 to try to puzzle out the best settings for shooting video with each of these.

GF1: Seems like MOTION PICTURE P MODE is a likely choice as, like the GH1, it assigns exposure (actually, exposure compensation, not aperture) to the dial. But can I set the shutter speed? The GH1 seems to always take ISO control away from the user -- it always seems to be AUTO? Or is there some other approach other than MOTION PICTURE P MODE that I should be considering to gain better control?

LX3: Looks like the only choice here is an all-auto MOTION PICTURE MODE with focus and exposure fixed when the record (shutter) button is depressed. Correct?

Thanks for wading through all these details -- they matter.
Bradley

averan
09-18-2010, 09:35 AM
reviving this old post. =)

i've been trying to shoot in full-manual, but find that the camera still takes over control of exposure compensation. that is gain, independent of f-stop, shutter and iso. and i have no way to control this manually.

i can see the camera making its little adjustments and i can watch the stupid -3_0_+3 line fluctuate, but i can't lock it or override it when in full manual!

am i missing something? the front wheel only alternates between aperture and shutter, both of which i usually want locked.

btw, Bradley, i prefer center-weighted metering. this seems to do a better job of setting exposure according to my subject instead of the background or according to the brightest spot in the frame.

averan
09-18-2010, 10:29 AM
think i figured it out....
i had iExposure turned on. looks to be behaving now that i've turned it back off. =)

Lpowell
09-26-2010, 12:07 PM
i've been trying to shoot in full-manual, but find that the camera still takes over control of exposure compensation. that is gain, independent of f-stop, shutter and iso. and i have no way to control this manually.
Yes, the catch with full Manual Video mode is that it disables the Aperture Lock button. I prefer Shutter Priority Video mode, even when using a manual-focus lens with an aperture ring. That allows me to set the shutter speed and ISO directly and lock them down with the AE lock button. I can then turn the aperture ring on the lens without the camera trying to compensate.

cheul
10-06-2010, 09:11 AM
Wait, in full manual video mode with my hacked GF1, both aperture and shutter speed stay locked to the settings I choose. From here, it's just a matter of turning iExposure off or on.
Is there anything I'm missing ?
I just saved this manual video mode with 1.7 aperture 1/50 shutter speed and iExposure off to a custom mode and voilą. (I have to add I usually put a fader ND in front during the day, which gives extra manual control over exposure)

Tembrock
10-08-2010, 03:49 PM
The gentleman at EyePatch Entertainment had some other great tips as well about creating good Movie Profiles for video (to assist with Color Grading). http://www.youtube.com/user/eyepatchentertainmen#p/search/7/4Nd9A5PQT1U

He also has two other videos on lenses and SDHC cards.

Indyreel
10-09-2010, 08:55 AM
My apeture keeps changing even in manual creative movie mode. Does anyone know what I'm doing wrong?

tflak
10-09-2010, 02:30 PM
My apeture keeps changing even in manual creative movie mode. Does anyone know what I'm doing wrong?

Go into the MOTION PICTURE MENU and make sure your EXPOSURE MODE is set to (M) manual (in addition to CMM)

chrisso
10-09-2010, 05:02 PM
make sure your EXPOSURE MODE is set to (M) manual

That must have been what i did, because in several weeks of shooting so far, in very mixed lighting situations, I've yet to see the camera over-ride my manual aperture, film speed and shutter speed choices.

londonis
11-13-2010, 10:35 PM
Would you adjust the ISO while shooting if lighting conditions changed due to changing lighting conditions, or just stay with the original settings?

Also, taking into consideration that I am clearly a novice, what would you do about focusing - manually or leave it on AF?

Thanks for the response.

londonis
11-13-2010, 10:47 PM
If you use AE lock after setting shutter speed and ISO doesn't that mean that the aperture setting will change of its own accord as lighting conditions change since the camera is still trying to maintain the exposure you locked in and the only item not fixed is in fact the aperture?

averan
11-13-2010, 10:54 PM
no. when you're in shutter priority, the camera's auto function is regulating the aperture. iso mode is set separately, either manual selection, auto, or intelligent auto. so if you lock the exposure, you are locking the aperture. it is no longer trying to maintain anything, in the sense that it continues to make adjustments.

londonis
11-15-2010, 07:14 PM
no. when you're in shutter priority, the camera's auto function is regulating the aperture. iso mode is set separately, either manual selection, auto, or intelligent auto. so if you lock the exposure, you are locking the aperture. it is no longer trying to maintain anything, in the sense that it continues to make adjustments.

Thanks for the clarification. So, it would seem to make little difference whether one shoots in Manual Mode or Shutter Priority Mode (with AE Lock set) - would that be correct?
Also, would you suggest shooting in Manual Focus mode (perhaps ajusting from time to time?) or in AF mode?

Thanks again for your input.

averan
11-16-2010, 02:18 PM
i think you're right. personally, i only shoot video in the video manual mode as i noticed the camera doing some weird exposure adjustments while in the regular (M) manual mode (don't remember if i used AE lock or not). the one difference though, is that in full manual, you must make the adjustments, while in S, the camera can do it for you. depends on your needs and preference/style of shooting. i like using the camera's auto functions sometimes for quick work, as long as i can lock those settings when i want.

when i shoot video, i pretty much always want the aperture as open as possible for shallow dof and i want the shutter to stay locked at 1/30 (when shooting 30p), so i only shoot in full manual video mode. i adjust my 'exposure' by either boosting ISO (if underexposed) or using a FaderND (if overexposed).

in general, i'll use AF to set the focus (except when using manual lenses of course). on controlled shoots, i'll then lock the focus by switching it to MF. on run-n-gun shoots, i like using the face-tracking AFC with the Lumix kit lens. if i know that the distance between me and my subject won't change during the take, i'll make sure to lock focus to avoid the AF hunting from time to time.

it can really vary depending on the lens. best advice is to try for yourself and find what works best for each situation and your style of shooting.

dustinash
01-14-2011, 01:14 AM
Go into the MOTION PICTURE MENU and make sure your EXPOSURE MODE is set to (M) manual (in addition to CMM)

are you sure your not changing the focal length on a zoom lens? Even in manual mode that will obviously change f values.

ZeusFaber
01-28-2011, 03:42 PM
when i shoot video, i pretty much always want the aperture as open as possible for shallow dof and i want the shutter to stay locked at 1/30 (when shooting 30p), so i only shoot in full manual video mode. i adjust my 'exposure' by either boosting ISO (if underexposed) or using a FaderND (if overexposed).


Why don't changing directly the exposure F2.0 F2.5 F5.6? I'm assuming you change it before the shot because whatever method will be visibible while shooting

averan
01-28-2011, 04:18 PM
changing the F-stop/aperture affects your depth of field. i like the shallowest dof possible, so i set my aperture/f-stop as low as possible. and since i'm shooting video and not stills, i need my shutter to stay put which means i have to use an ND filter to bring exposure down, or add light or boost ISO to bring exposure up. and yes, this is all done before the shot.