PDA

View Full Version : GH1 or consumer HD camcorder for casual use?



cmd
11-24-2009, 01:45 PM
For casual home use, how does the GH1 compare -- video quality, OIS, ease of use (I prefer mostly autopilot for what I do), etc? I have a HF100 and just shoot home movies with it. When I get the time, I'll edit in iMovie and save the file for PS3 playback. On a recent trip I was juggling my HF100 with a borrowed DSLR thinking, "boy it'd be nice if the 2 were combined and I could only carry one."

Barry_Green
11-24-2009, 02:10 PM
The GH1 is the most camcorderlike of the DSLRs. Frankly, I don't really see the purpose of keeping a separate consumer camcorder, if you have the need for an SLR too the GH1 does great at it. Its 720/60p is fantastic, and it can also do a pretty darn good job as a budget digital cinema camera too.

cmd
11-24-2009, 02:14 PM
I read that you have to watch the shutter speed or you can get some funky video. True or not so much in practice?

Barry_Green
11-24-2009, 02:21 PM
If you're shooting in manual mode, stick the shutter on 1/60 and ignore it. If you're in automatic mode, then yes the shutter can change on you, and that's never a good thing when shooting motion video.

Martti Ekstrand
11-24-2009, 02:22 PM
Absolutely true. Short shutter speeds make for a jerky looking video and can choke the encoding with too much sharp detail on motion. If in a NTSC/60Hz land use 1/60 // if in PAL/50Hz land use 1/50*. This necessitates for shooting outdoors in daylight getting neutral density filters or a Fader ND.

*Unless using the 720 mode for slow-motion, then double the shutter speeds to 1/125 // 1/100.

cmd
11-24-2009, 03:00 PM
Hmmmm.... for action stills using a ND filter would be a BAD thing. Without a ND filter 1/60-1/125 can be pretty slow on a sunny day. Can the 14-140 lens stop down far enough without one?

I'd want to be able to quickly switch from stills to video. How would I do this without over complicating life? (re: the shutter speed discussion )

Barry_Green
11-24-2009, 03:03 PM
With a GH1, it's "shoot video. Rotate the dial one notch, shoot stills."

Martti Ekstrand
11-24-2009, 03:10 PM
'Spose a Fader ND chould be the ticket for you. But you got to ask others about them - I only use standard ones as I only shoot video - haven't shot a still yet with the GH1. You could also get a Cokin or HiTech filter kit with holders - with those yanking out the ND is faster than swapping cameras like you describe.

If you don't care about getting a short depth of field in video then of course you can step down the aperture in video mode just like when shooting stills. Most people here including myself use GH1 to get that pretty bokeh background in our films and thus stick on NDs like crazy when out in the living daylights to keep the aperture open.

cmd
11-24-2009, 03:37 PM
With a GH1, it's "shoot video. Rotate the dial one notch, shoot stills."

But if its sunny, it sounds more like: "shoot video, rotate dial one notch, screw off ND filter, shoot stills"?

Barry_Green
11-24-2009, 03:52 PM
ND filters are a fact of life with all DSLRs. Can't avoid it. Of course, you could shoot stills with the ND filter on, too...

ajamils
11-24-2009, 04:53 PM
If you're shooting in manual mode, stick the shutter on 1/60 and ignore it. If you're in automatic mode, then yes the shutter can change on you, and that's never a good thing when shooting motion video.

Not to hijack the thread...but I'm confused...when shooting 1080i24p... should 1/60 shutter be used or 1/50 ?? Some people say that you should always use 1/50 because it is closest to 48 (double the number of frames) while others say stick with 1/60 ???? :undecided

As for OPs questions, I bought GH1 after using Pansonic TM300, Sony XR500 (only for couple of days) and Sanyo FH1 and I'm more than happy with my decision. The biggest advantage of GH1 is that it not only takes great video but amazing stills as well which camcorders lack and because of that you are forced to carry two cameras (which I hate).

Barry_Green
11-24-2009, 05:21 PM
Not to hijack the thread...but I'm confused...when shooting 1080i24p... should 1/60 shutter be used or 1/50 ?? Some people say that you should always use 1/50 because it is closest to 48 (double the number of frames) while others say stick with 1/60 ???? :undecided
It really doesn't make much difference. Film cameras use anywhere from about 1/43 to 1/60 as a standard shutter speed.

The reason to go with 1/50 is to emulate (as close as possible) the 1/48 exposure of a 180-degree shutter on a film camera. But there's a danger to going with 1/50th, if you're in a USA/NTSC territory and shooting under older fluorescent or HMI magnetic-ballast lights. That danger is that the 1/50 shutter will interact with the 60Hz lights and cause rolling waves of fluttering in your images. Same will happen in a PAL territory if using 1/60 shutter under 50Hz lights.

So -- if you're in the USA, you can use 1/50 in daylight, under tungsten, or when you're CERTAIN that the HMI or fluorescents you're using are high-frequency electronic ballasts. But if you're not 100% certain, just go with 1/60th and don't risk it.

In the PAL territories you're pretty safe with 1/50 across the board.

BhambuNath
11-24-2009, 08:56 PM
You should also consider the Auto Focus - though it works good in the bright outdoor situations but it becomes really hard to get things in focus automatically once you are in low light.

I think if you are coming from a consumer video camera which you've been using with auto focus, they you should also embrace yourself for focusing manually in the low light shooting.

Though it's not a problem if you are doing controlled shots with actors but run and gun become little cumbersome when you need the things in focus all the time....